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Full text of "Recital programs 1930-1931"

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List of Concerts and Operas 

Faculty Recitals 

First Miss Harriet van Emden, Soprano. . .November 17, 1930 

_ , (Miss Lucile Lawrence) 

becond. . J >Harpists November 24, 1930 

IMr. Carlos Salzedo / 

Third Mr. Mieczyslaw Munz, Pianist December 9, 1930 

Fourth . . . .Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist December 16, 1930 

Fifth Mr. Abram Chasins, Pianist January 8, 1931 

Sixth Mr. Horatio Connell, Baritone January 12, 1931 

Seventh . . .Mr. Felix Salmond, Violoncellist January 19, 1931 

Eighth Mr. Efrem Zimbalist, Violinist March 2, 1931 

(Madame Isabelle Vengerova, Pianist) 
Ninth . . .\ Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist, . /April 30, 1931 

(^Mr. Felix Salmond, Violoncellist 1 

Tenth Mr. Josef Hofmann, Pianist May 12, 1931 



Special Concert 
The Musical Art Quartet March 11, 1931 



Students' Concerts 

("These programs, while listed alphabeticallji according to Instructor's name, 
are bound according to date.) 

pecember 10, 1930 

Students of Mr. Bachmann <; 

(April 13, 1931 

I Chamber Music. April 14, 1931 
Students of Dr. Bailly in j ^.^j^ ^^^ ^g^ ^^3^ 

Students of Mr. Connell May 4, 1931 

Students of Mr. de Gogorza April 27, 1931 

("January 14, 1931 

Students of Mr. Hofmann < 

(Apnl 28, 1931 

(November 12, 1930 
Students of Madame Luboshutz <( 

(May 20, 1931 

Students of Mr. Meiff March 30, 1931 

Students of Mr. Salmond April 23, 1931 

(March 25, 1931 
1931 

Students of Mr. Saperton April 24, 193 1 

Students of Madame Sembrich May 1, 1931 

Students of Mr. Tabuteau May 5, 1931 

Students of Mr. Torello April 16, 1931 

Students of Miss van Emden May 15, 1931 

„ , r., w (April 22, 1931 

Students of Madame Vengerova < 

(May 19, 1931 

Students of Mr. von Wymetal 

in Operatic Acting May 11, 13, 14, 1931 

o J r ^. r, (January 20, 1931 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist < 

(March 18, 1931 

Students of Mr. Hofmann. Madame ) 

Luboshutz, and Madame Vengerova >■ March 4, 10, 17, 1931 

(Beethoven Sonata Recitals) ) 

(January 28, 1931 
The Curtis Symphony Orchestra ) February 8, 9, 23, 193 1 

iMay 9, 16, 1931 



Students of Mr. Salzedo < .. 

(April 1, 



Chamber Music 

'November 9, 1930 
|December 14, 1930 

The Pennsylvania Museum of Art (February 1, 1931 

[March 8, 1931 
^ April 19, 1931 

Concert Course 

Octave Club, Norristown, Pennsylvania < ' 

(April 15, 1931 

Western Maryland College, Westminster, ('November 14, 1930 

Maryland (April 10, 1931 

State Teachers' College, West Chester, ^November 18, 1930 

Pennsylvania (February 4, 1931 

The Wednesday Club, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania< ' 

(March 10, 1931 

{November 20, 1930 
February 19, 1931 
April 16, 1931 
The Woman's Club, Moorestown, New Jersey. .December 1, 1930 

New Jersey College for Women, New Brunswick, 

New Jersey December 5, 1930 

o c u 1 r> c I, 1 D 1 • (December 13, 1930 

Lreorge bchool, George School, Pennsylvania. . .< 

(March 7, 1931 

Marywood College, Scranton, Pennsylvania . . . .< ' 

(April 28, 1931 

High School, Point Pleasant Beach, 

New Jersey January 16, 1931 

The Contemporary and College Clubs, Trenton, 

New Jersey February 3, 1931 

The Public Schools, Lakewood, New Jersey March 21, 1931 

Salon Music Club, Lambertville, New Jersey. . . .April 17, 1931 

Westtown School, Westtown, Pennsylvania April 24, 1931 

Cape May County Art League, Cape May, 

New Jersey May 1, 1931 

Haddon Fortnightly Club, Haddonfield, 

New Jersey May 1, 1931 



Performances of Philadelphia Grand Opera Company in 

Affiliation with The Curtis Institute of Music 

First Aida October 16, 1930 

Second Le Jongleur de Notre Dame. October 23, 1930 

Third Gianni Schicchi and 

Pagliacci October 30, 1930 

Fourth Lucia di Lammermoor November 6, 1930 

Fifth Boris Godounov November 13, 1930 

Sixth Tosca November 27, 1930 

Seventh La Traviata December 4, 1930 

Eighth Thais December 11, 1930 

Ninth Hansel und Gretel and 

Die Puppenfee December 20, 1930 

Tenth Lohengrin January 15, 1931 

Eleventh Rigoletto February 5, 1931 

Twelfth Madama Butterfly February 26, 1931 

Thirteenth. . . .Faust March 5, 193 1 

Fourteenth . . .L'Heure Espagnole and 

Cavalleria Rusticana .. .March 12, 1931 

Fifteenth Wozzeck March 19, 1931 

Sixteenth Les Pecheurs de Perles March 26, 1931 

Seventeenth . .Carmen April 9, 1931 

Eighteenth Tannhauser April 16, 1931 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-1931 



First Faculty Recital 



Mr. Harry Kaufman &i Ae Piano 



tAonday Evening, l^ovember 17, 1930 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the Official Piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 
I. 

Arias: "Ah, lo so" from "II Flauto ^ 
Magico" y 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
•om { 

"Le Nosze di Figaro", 



"Non so piu cosa son" from ( 



> Franz Schubert 



II. 

Die Mutter Erde 

Auflosung 

Lied der Braut, I. and II ) ^ 

. r .. > Robert Schumann 

Auftrage j 

"Am Sonntag Morgen" ) 

Vorschneller Schwur > Johannes Brahms 

Botschaft ) 

III. 

Lieder nach Verlaine Rudolf Mengelberg 

(dedicated to Miss van Emden) 

Im Gefangnis-k (pirst performance 
Herbstgesang J in America) 
Regenlied 
Winter 

IV. 

L ombre des arbres Claude Debussy 

L oiseau bleu Camille Decreus 

yes oros O [.^ .^ Russian) SeRGEI RaCHMANINOV 

O dolgo buda yaj 

Dutch Serenade (Sung in Dutch) Samuel De Lange 

"Thou art Mine" Abram Chasins 

(The Compoier at the Piano) 

V. 

Aria: "Ah, non credea mirarti" from "La Sonnambula," 

Vincenzo Bellini 



gli i i n iii [| imiii n i Mi il i n ii i i ii ii ili :ni , nliiiil llii[ilillilliniiij,iili,jlill| || ||| || |MllllllinM lll l lll l lllllllllll lli llllllllllllllll ll ll l llli n gg 



Aria: "Ah, lo so" from 
"II flauto magico" 

Ah! lo so, piii non m'avanza 
Che lagnarmi ognor cosi, 
Ho perduta la speranza, 
Di tornar felice un di. 

Ah! per te se invan degg'io 
Pianger sempre, e sospirar, 
PiQ pietosa al pianto mio, 
Tronchi morte il mio penar. 



(Translation) 

Aria from "The Magic Flute' 

Ah, I feel how all hath vanish'd 
Born of love to life and light; 
Toy hath fled, as day flies banish'd 
Drooping, dying, dark with night. 

Lo, Tamino, now this mine anguish 
Pours full off'ring t'ward thy shrine 
Learn a love no pow'r can vanquish; 
Save the closing tomb's confine! 



Aria: "Non so piu cosa son" from 
"Le Nozse di Figaro" 

Non so piO cosa son' cosa faccio. 
Or di foco, ora sono di ghiaccio, 
Ogni donna cangiar di colore, 
Ogni donna mi fa palpitar. 

Solo ai nomi d'amor, di diletto, 
Mi si turba, mi s'altera il petto, 
E a parlare mi sforza d'amore 
Un desio ch'io non posso spiegar. 

Parlo d'amor vegliando, 

Parlo d'amor sognando, 

A I'acqua, a I'ombra, ai monti, 

Ai fiori, a I'erbe, ai fonti, 

A I'eco, a I'aria, ai venti, 

Che il suon de' vani accenti 

Portano via con se. 

E se non ho chi m'oda, 

Parlo d'amor con me. 



(Translation) 

Aria from "The Marriage of Figaro" 

I don't know what I'm saying or doing. 
First I'm freezing and then I'm glowing, 
Ev'ry woman can set me aflutter, 
Ev'ry woman can set me afire! 

If the sweet name of love be but spoken. 
Ah ! my heart-beats grow troubled and broken; 
And loving phrases I'm driven to utter, 
By the impulse of some unknown desire. 

Whether asleep or waking, 

Ever of love I'm talking. 

To forests, lakes and mountains. 

To flow'rs and grass and fountains. 

The echoes where I tarry, 

And winds and breezes carry 

My empty words away. 

If no one else be near me, 

Yet I myself can hear me, 

When loving words I say. 



Die Mutter Erde 

Des Lebens Tag ist schwer und schwiil, 
Des Todes Atem leicht und kiihl, 
Er wehet freundlich uns hinab, 
Wie welkes Laub in's stille Grab. 

Es scheint der Mond, es fiillt der Tau 
Auf's Grab, wie auf die Blumenau, 
Doch fallt der Freunde Tr.-in' hinein, 
Erhellt von sanfter Hoffnung Schein. 

Uns sammelt alle, Klein und Gross, 
Die Mutter Erd' in ihren Schoss, 
O sab'n wir ihr in's Angesicht, 
Wir scheuten ihren Busen nicht. 

— Stolherg. 



(Translation) 

Mother Earth 

The day of life is dark and hot, 
The breath of death is light and cool, 
Friendly it wafts us down below. 
As withered leaves into our graves. 

The moonlight shines, the dewdrops fall, 
Upon the graves and meadows, too, 
But if a friendly tear flows down, 
A ray of hope lights up the gloom. 

We all are gathered, large and small. 
By Mother Earth into her lap, 
Oh, could we only see her face. 
We should not fear to rest with her. 



Auflosung 



Verbirg dich, Sonne, 

Denn die Gluten der Wonne 

Versengen mein Gebein. 

Verstummet, Tone, 

Friihlingsschone, 

Fliichte dich und lass mich allein. 

Quellen doch aus alien Falten 

Meiner Seele liebliche Gewalten, 

Die mich umschlingen, 

Himmlisch singen. 

Geh' unter. Welt, und store 

Nimmer die sussen atberischen Ch6re. 

— Mayrhofer. 



(Translation) 

Dissolution 

Hide yourself. Sun, 
For the fires of joy 
Are scorching my bones. 
Be silent, sounds, 
Beauty of springtime. 
Disappear, leave me alone. 

Still well from out the folds 

Of my soul, precious powers. 

Which embrace me. 

Singing of Heaven. 

Perish, World, and never 

Disturb the sweet unearthly chorus. 



Lied der Braut, I 

Mutter, Mutter, glaube nicht, 

Weil ich ihn lieb' allsosehr, 

Dass nun Liebe mir gebricht, 

Dich zu lieben wie vorher. 

Mutter, Mutter, seit ich ihn 

Liebe, lieb' ich erst dich sehr. 

Lass mich an mein Herz dich zieh'n 

Und dich ktissen wie mich Erl 

Seit ich ihn liebe 

Lieb' ich erst dich ganz. 

Dass du mir das Sein verlieh'n. 

Das mir ward zu solchem Glanz. 

— Ruckert. 



(Translation) 

The Bride's Song, I 

Mother, mother, do not think. 
Though I love him more and more. 
That my love for thee will sink. 
Will be weaker than before. 
Mother, mother, do not fear. 
More than ever I love thee, 
Let me clasp thee, mother dear. 
Kiss thee, love, as he does me I 
Mother, mother, do not fear, 
More than ever I love thee 
Who existence gav'st me here. 
That such gladness mine might be I 



Lied der Braut, II 

Lass' mich ibm am Busen hangen. 
Mutter, Mutter, lass' das Bangen, 
Frage nicht, wie soil sich's wenden, 
Frage nicht, wie soil das enden. 
Enden? enden soil sich's nie, 
Wenden? weiss ich noch nicht wie. 

— Rnckert. 



(Translation) 

The Bride's Song, II 

Let me hang on his caresses. 
Mother, what so much distresses? 
Ask not: whither all is tending? 
Ask not: what will be the ending? 
Ending? End there none will bel 
Tending? All unknown to met 



Auftrage 



Nicht so schnellel Wart' ein wenig, kleine 

Welle I 
Will dir einen Auftrag geben an die Liebste 

mein. 
Wirst du ihr vorQberschweben, griisse sie mir 

f ein 1 
Sag', ich wSre mitgekommen, auf dir selbst 

herabgeschwommen. 
Fur den Gruss einen Kuss kfihn mir zu 

erbitteni 
Doch der Zeit Dringlichkeit hatt' es nicht 

gelitten. 

Nicht so eiligl halt! erlaube, kleine leicht- 

beschwingte Taube! 
Habe dir was aufzutragen an die Liebste 

mein! 
Sollst ihr tausend Griisse sagen, hundert oben- 

dreinl 
Sag', ich war' mit dir geflogen, fiber Berg 

und Strom gezogen: 
FUr den Gruss einen Kuss kiihn mir zu 

erbitten ! 
Doch der Zeit Dringlichkeit hatt' es nicht 

gelitten. 

Warte nicht, dass ich dich treibe, o du trage 

Mondesscheibe. 
Weisst's ja, was ich dir befohlen fUr die 

Liebste mein: 
Durcb das Fensterchen verstohlen griisse sie 

mir f ein I 
Sag', ich war auf dich gestiegen, selber zu ihr 

hinzufliegen : 
FUr den Gruss einen Kuss kiihn mir zu 

erbitten. 
Du seist scbuld, Ungeduld hatt' mich nicht 

gelitten. 

— I'EgrM. 



(Translation) 

Messages 

Wait a moment, wait a little 

Not so swiftly, tiny ripple! 

For I'd have thee bear a message 

To my true love's feet 

When to her you've made your passage, 

Give her greetings sweet! 

Say, I'd fain to her be wafted. 
On thy bosom gently rafted. 
For the bliss of her kiss 
Boldly to be sueing: 
Short the day, long the way; 
Thou must do my wooing. 

Not so swiftly! stop, I pray thee. 

Little light-winged dove; oh, stay thee! 

For there is a message tender 

In my heart that bides! 

Thousand greetings I would send her. 

Hundreds more besides. 

Say, I'd fain have flown to meet 

Over hill and stream, to greet her 

For the bliss of her kiss 

Boldly to be sueing: 

Short the day, long the way; 

Thou must do my wooing. 

Oh, delay not, if thou love me. 
Slender crescent moon above me! 
Down the starry heaven sliding, 
Go, my love to meet. 
Thro' her chamber window gliding. 
Give her greetings sweet! 

Say I'd fain on thee be flying. 
To be near her I'd be trying. 
For the bliss of her kiss 
Boldly to be sueing; 
Is for thee, but for me 
Thou must do my wooing. 



her. 



Am Sonntag Morgen 

Am Sonntag Morgen zierlich angetan, 
Wohl weiss ich, wo du da bist hingegangen, 
Und manche Leute waren, die dich sah'n, 
Und kamen dann zu mir, dich zu verklagen. 

Als sie mir's sagten, hab' ich laut gelacht, 
Und in der Kammer dann geweint zur Nacht, 
Als sie mir's sagten, fing ich an zu singen, 
Um einsam dann die Hande wund zu ringen. 

— Heyse. 



(Translation) 

On Sunday Morning 

To whotn it was you went quite well I knew, 
So beautifully dressed on Sunday morning; 
And certain folk there were who saw you go. 
Who hurried then to me to give me warning. 

While they were telling me I laughed outright. 
And in my room alone I wept that night. 
While they were telling me I trolled a ditty. 
But when alone I wrung my hands for pity. 



Vorschneller Schwur 

Schwor ein junges Madchen: 
Blumen nie zu tragen, 
Niemals Wein zu trinken, 
Knaben nie zu kilssen. 
Gestern schwor das Madchen 
Heute schon bereut es: 

Wenn ich Blumen trflge, 
War' ich doch noch schoner! 
Wenn ich Rothwein tranke, 
War 'ich doch noch froherl 
Wenn den Liebsten kiisste, 
War' mir doch noch wohlerl 

— Siegfried Kapper. 



(Translation) 

Hasty Vows 

Vow'd a tender maiden. 
Ne'er to wear a flower, 
Ne'er to drain a wineglass. 
Ne'er to kiss a lover. _ 
Yesterday she vow'd it. 
But today repents it: 

Were I deck'd with flowers 
They would make me fairer! 
If red wine I tasted 
I'd be still more merry I 
And my lover's kisses 
Make my fond heart happy I 



Botschaft 

Wehe,_ LUftchen, lind und lieblicb 
Utn die Wange der Geliebten, 
Spiele zart in ihrer Locke, 
Eile nicht hinweg zu flieh'nt 
Tut sie dann vielleicht die Frage, 
Wie es um mich Armen stehe, 
Sprich: „Unendlich war sein Wehe, 
Hochst bedenklich seine Lage; 
Aber jetzo kann er hoffen, 
Wieder herrlich aufzuleben, 
Denn du, Holde, denkst an ihn. 



( Translation) 

The Message 

Fan, ye breezes, fair and softly, 

Fan the cheek of my sweet lady; 

Gently sport ye with her tresses. 

Hasten not to speed away. 

If she then perchance should query 

How poor I, poor I, was farmg. 

Say: "His grief was past all bearing. 

Very sad his lot, ah, very. 

Now his hopes once more reviving. 

Have restored the joy of living. 

Since his lady thinks of him I" 



Im Gefangnis 



Der Himmel ist am Dache dort 

So blau, so lind I 
Der Wipfel dicht am Dache dort 

Schaukelt _ im Wind. 
Die Glocke in dem Himmel dort 

So traulich klingt, 
Ein vogel in dem Baume dort 

Wehklagend singt. 
Mein Gott, mein Gott, die Welt liegt da 

Schlicht, still und glatt, 
Das Hebe leise Larmen da 

Kommt aus der Stadt. 
Was hast du getan, o Du da I 

Weinst nun voll Pein! 
Sage, wie hast Du verbracht — o Du da I 

Die Jugend Dein? 

— Ernst Hardt. 



(Translation) 

In a Prison 

The sky above the gable here 

Is blue and fair, 
A tree close by the gable here 

Sways in the air. 
The bell from out the heavens there 

Doth sweetly ring, 
A bird upon the linden there 

His plaint doth sing. 
O God! O God! the world lies there 

Tranquil and sweet. 
Those low and gentle murmurings there 

Come from the street. 
What hast thou done, O thou man! 

Dost shed hot tears — 
What hast thou made, O thou manl 

Of thy young years? 



Herbstgesang 

So dumpfen Reigen 
Die Herbstgeigen 

StiJhnen, 
Dass sie im Herzen 
Wie dumpfe Schmerzen 

Drohnen. 

Gewflrgt vom entsetzten 
Gewissen beim letzten 

Schlage, 
Denk ich an meine 
Jugend und weine 

Und klagel 

Ich segle blind 
Mit bosem Wind — 

Der hat 
Sein Spiel, feldaus feldein 
Treibt er mich fort wie 

Totes Blatt. 

— Ernst Hardt. 



(Translation) 

Song of Autumn 

On plaintive strings 
The autumn sings, 

Unrelenting. 
His monotone 
My spirit alone 

Is tormenting. 

Sad fancy cowers. 
While hours 

Go slowly creeping, 
O'er mem'ry's hosts 
Of pallid ghosts, 

I am weeping. 

The swift wind leaps, 
The foliage sweeps 

Hither, thither. 
I, too, must die. 
Like leaves that fly 

Whither? 



Regenlied 



Wie nun des Regens Gerinn 
Rauschend die Stadt umsingt, 
Fiihl ich ein Trauern, das in 
Meine schauernde Seele dringt. 
Rerien, o Regengesang, 
Dacher- und bodenwarts. 
Was bist du fiir lieber Gesang 
Fiir mein einsames Herz I 

Dein Klingen and Klagen, es klopft 

Mir auch im Herzen, das heiss 

Sich in Tranen zertropft 

Und doch seine Trauer nicht weiss. 

Wer, o wer sagt mir das, 

Warum sich mein Herz so betriibt, 

Dass es stumm, ohne Liebe, ohne Hass, 

Einem grundlosen Grame sich gibt? 

— Stefan Zweig. 



(Translation) 

Rain Song 

Just as the fall of the rain 
Droning, sings 'round the town. 
Sadness steals over me. 
Folding my shuddering soul. 
Rain, oh song of the rain. 
Beating on roof and earth. 
What consolation you are 
For my lonely heart. 

Your singing and beating, it knocks 

Also within my heart, 

W'hich melts into burning tears. 

Though knowing its sorrow not. 

Who, oh, who can tell me 

Why my heart is wrung with grief, 

That dumbly, without love, without hate. 

It sinks into groundless grief? 



Winter 

So ode das Land, 

Es endet nimmer; 

Das Schneegeflimmer 

Schimmert wie Sand. 

Der kupferne Himmel 

Gibt keinen Glanz, 

Der Mond tanzt am Himmel 

Den Totentanz. 

Wie Wolkengespinste 

Schwanken im Grauen 

Die Eichen, es brauen 

Die Nebeldiinste. 

Der kupferne Himmel 

Gibt keinen Glanz, 

Der Mond tanzt am Hitnmel 

Den Totf^ntanz. 

Ihr gierigen Krahen, 

Ihr Wolfe, ihr lungernden. 

Was tat euch der hungernden 

Winde Wehen? 

So ode das Land, 

Es endet nimmer; 

Das Schneegeflimmer 

Schimmert wie Sand. 

— Fritz Kogel. 



(Translation) 

Winter 

So empty the earth, it endeth never; 
The shimmering snow glistens like sand. 
The coppery heaven gives off no sheen, 
The moon does a dance, the Dance of Death. 
Like spiderwebbed clouds tremble in greyness 
The oak trees, the rising fog thickens. 
The coppery heaven gives off no sheen. 
The moon does a dance, the Dance of Death. 
Your ravenous crows, your wolves, your des- 
perates. 
What did the hungry winds do to you? 
So empty the earth, it endeth never; 
The shimmering snow glistens like sand. 



ll ll l l l ll l ll ll ll lllli ll lllillllll iiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiinillllllliilllllinninniii i i i i n i ii ii n i il Il l ll llll l l iiiiniiiiiiilnliiiniiii]iiilii|nnh llll in illlllllll ll ll!l l lllll l llllllllll_t 



L'ombre des arbres 

L 'ombre des arbres dans la riviere embrum^e 

Meurt comma de la fum^e 
Tandis qu'en I'air, parmi les ramures rCelles 

Se plaignent les tourterelles. 

Combien, 6 voyageur ce paysage bleme, 

Te mira bleme toi-meme 
Et que tristes pleuraient dans les hautes 
feuillees 
Tes esp^rances noy^es. 

— Paul Verlaine. 



(Translation) 

Shadows of Trees 

See the faint shadows of trees that fall on 
the river, 
Fading away as they quiver. 
Whilst on the soaring, tremulous branches 
above 
Is softly wailing the dove. 

Thou seest, O pallid wanderer, yon shadows 

that tremble, 
Closely thine inmost self resemble. 
Thus lament all thy hopes that like dust are 

now scattered. 
Thy fondest visions now shattered. 



L'Oiseau bleu 



(Translation) 

The Blue Bird 



II est un tout petit oiseau qui toujuour vole. 

II est iin tout petit oiseau 

Plus Ifger que le passereau 

Plus lOger que la brise foUe, 

Veut on le saisir, il s'envole 

Le petit, tout petit tout petit oiseau. 

II est un tout petit oiseau, qui toujours chante. 

II est un tout petit oiseau 

Fr^re cadet de I'f'tourneau 

De sa chanson insouciante, 

II nous ravit tout et nous hante, 

Le petit, tout petit, tout petit, oiseau. 

II est un tout petit oiseau, 
Oiseau bleu ch^ri du poete, 
II est un tout petit oiseau, 
Sa cage est une exquise tete, 
Son perchoir un gentil cerveau 
Et tous les jours, il fait la fete. 
Le petit, tout petit, tout petit oiseau. 

— Hettisch. 



There is a little, little bird, always flying. 
There is a tiny little bird 

More mischievous than a sparrow. 
Lighter than the restiess breeze 

Try to catch it, awav it flies 

The little, little bird. 

There is a tiny little bird always singing. 
There is a little tiny bird 

Little brother of the starling. 
Ravishing and haunting, 

Is his heedless song 

The little, little bird. 

There is a little, tiny bird. 
The blue bird, the poets' pet 

There is a tiny little bird, 
His cage an exquisite head, 
And there he roosts 

Breathlessly singing his merry song. 



(Translation) 

Zdyes Chorosho (How Fair This 
Spot) 

How fair this spot! 

I gaze to where the golden brook runs by, 

The fields are all inlaid with flow'rs. 

The white clouds sail on high. 

No step draws near, 

Such silence reigns 

Alone with God I seem; 

With Him and with the hoary pines 

And thee — my only dream 1 

— Galina. 



(Translation) 

O Dolgo Buda Ya (In the Silence 
of Night) 

Oh, my ears will long hear, 
\yhen night comes on and silence. 
Your treacherous stammering, 
My eyes still see your picture. 
And then my fingers feel, 
Your head's soft depth of hair. 
And then your smile before me. 

— FoTH. 



P iiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiniMiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiiiii I i i i iili ill ll l l lll l ll lll ll l llll i ll lllll l llllll l l l l ll lllll l llll l lllllll l l llhl l l lll l lllll ll llllll lll lllll i nm;; 



(TrtMislation) 

Dutch Serenade 

Sleep light. 

Hear how the fountains with slumber are 

flowing, 
Hear in the branches the breeze gently blowing, 
Hark to their voice in the stillness of night. 
Sleep light. 

Sleep light. 

Hear how the notes of the nightingale linger 
Soft in the treetops, a sad, dreaming singer. 
Hark to his flute, in the stillness of night. 
Sleep light! 



Thou Art Mine! 

So torn and sad is my heart. 

True lovers never should part. 

The sleepless nights I wait for the morrow, 

They yield me naught but sorrow. 

Please hurry thee to me 

And on thy peaceful breast my head shall rest. 

So great my anguish, 
Should thou refuse 
To lie and languish, 
Thus in my arms 
Thy wond'rous charms I 

And yet I must not forget 
That life began when we met. 
And e'en tho fate desires to part us 
She finds she can't divide us; 
And on thy lips I seal my vow 
That I am thine and thou art mine! 

— ^Abram Chasins. 



Arie: "Ah! Non credea mirarti' 
from "La Sonnambula" 

Ah! non credea mirarti. 
Si presto estinto, o fiori, 
Passasti a) par, d'amore, 
Che un giorno sol duro. 
Potria novel vigore, 
II pianto mio recarti. 
Ma ravvivar I'amore 
II mio, ah! no, non puo. 

Ah! non giunge uman pensiero 

Al contento ond'io son plena : 

A' miei sensi io credo appena; 

Tu mi affidao mio tesor. 

Ah! m'abbraccia, e sempre insieme, 

Serapre uniti in una speme, 

Delia terra in cui viviamo. 

Ci formiamo un ciel d'amor. 



(Translation) 

"Ah, recall not" from "The 
Somnambulist" 

Ah, must ye fade, sweet flowers, 

Forsaken by sunlight and showers. 

As transient as love's emotion, 

That lives and withers in one short summer 

day. 
But though no sun shine o'er ye, 
These tears might yet restore ye. 
But an estranged devotion 
No mourner's tears have power to stay. 

Oh, recall not one earthly sorrow 
With the blisses of heaven around us. 
An illusion it was that bound us; 
Thou, Elvino, art true to love. 
Ah, embrace me, my heart delighted. 
In one hope now with thine united, 
Hand in hand while on earth we wander. 
We will form a heav'n of love. 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season — 19304931 



Second Faculty Recital 



MISS LUCILE LAWRENCE am^ 
MR. CARLOS SALZEDO, Hai-pisfs 



Casimir Hall 



yionday Evening, T^ovember 24, 1930 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



I. 

Pavane Unknown Composer 

XVI Century 

Gavotte des Moutons Padre Giambattista Martini 

17064784 

Les Tourbillons pRANgois Dandrieu 

16844780 

Sarabande pRANgois Couperin 

16684733 

La Joyeuse JeaN'Philippe Rameau 

16834764 
for two harps 



II. 

Sonata Carlos Salzedo 

(1922) 
for harp and piano 

LuciLE Lawrence, Harp — Carlos Salzedo, Piano 



III. 

Pentacle Carlos Salzedo 

(1928) 
Steel 
Serenade 
Felines 
Catacombs 
Pantomime 

for two harps 



Miss Lawrence and Mr. Saliedo use Lyon (f Healy Harps exclusively 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Seventh Season— 1930-1931 

Third Faculty Recital 

MR. MIECZYSLAW MUNZ, Pianist 

Casimir hall 
l^uesday Evening, December 9, 1930 

at 8:30 o'c\oc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



* 



1. Aria and Thirty Variations Bach-Busoni 



2. Two Sonatas Domenico Scarlatti 



3. Suite Antique JosEF Hofmann 

AUemande 
Courante 
Gavotte 
Gigue 



4. Prelude Anatole Liadov 



5. Soiree de Vienne, No. 6 ScHUBERT-LisZT 



6. Rhapsodic Espagnole Franz Liszt 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season — 1930-1931 



Fourth Faculty Recital 



MADAME LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violmisf 

assisted by an Orchestra composed of students of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

conducted by 

MR. EMIL MLYNARSKI 
and 

LOUIS VYNER 
(student of Mr. Mlynarski in Conducting) 



Casimir Hall 



Tuesday Evening, Decemher 16, 1930 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Personnel of the Orchestra 



First Violins 

Judith Poska 
James Bloom 
Celia Gomberg 
Ethel Stark 
Jacob Brodsky 
Philip Frank 

Second Violins 

Henry Siegl 
Robert Gomberg 
Laura Griffing 
Eva Stark 
Bernice Bird 
Jean Spitaer 

Violas 

George Humphrey 
David Cohen 

Violoncelli 

Howard Mitchell 
Samuel Geschichter 
Florence Williams 

Basses 

Jack Posell 
Irven Whitenack 



Flutes 

John Hreachmack 
Ardelle Hookins 
Emil Opava 

Ohoes 

Isadore Goldblum 
Sidney Divinsky 

Clarinets 

Robert Hartman 
Leon Lester 



Bassoons 

William Santucci 
Andrew Luck 



Horns 

Henry Whitehead 
Harry Berv 
Theodore Seder 
Jack Berv 

Trumpets 

John C. Schuler 
John Harmaala 

Tympani 

Frank Schwartz 



Programme 



I. 

Concerto, No. 8, in A minor (Gesangscene), 

for Violin and Orchestra LuDWIG SPOHR 

Allegro molto — Adagio — Allegro moderate 

Conducted by Mr. Vyner 



II. 

Concerto in E minor, for Violin and Orchestra JULES CoNUS 

Allegro molto — Andante espressivo — Allegro molto 

Conducted by Mr. Mlynarski 



III. 

Concerto in D major, Opus 35, for Violin and 

Orchestra PeTER I. TsCHAIKOWSKY 

Allegro moderate 
Canzonetta 
Allegro vivacissimo 

Conducted by Mr. Mlynarski 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season — 1930-1931 



Fifth Faculty Recital 



MR. ABRAM CHASINS, Pianist-Composer 



Casimir Hall 



Thursday Evening, January 8, 1931 

at 8:30 o'c\oc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of Thr Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



I. 

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugne in D minor . . .Johann Sebastian Bach 

II. 

Variations Serieuses Felix Mendelssohn 

III. 

Fairy Tale 

(First performance) 

Six Preludes 

A flat major 

F minor / AbRAM ChASINS 

G flat major 
D major 
F sharp minor 
B minor 

Standchen Strauss-Godowsky 

Liebeslied Kreisler-Rachmaninov 

IV. 

Six Preludes, Opus 28 

C major 
G major 
G sharp minor 

G minor \, FrEDERIC ChOPIN 

B flat minor 
D minor 

Nocturne in D flat major. Opus 27, No. 2 

Scherzo in C sharp minor, Opus 39 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season— 1930-1931 



Sixth Faculty Recital 



MR. HORATIO CONNELL, Bari£one 

Helen Jepson, Soprano 

Daniel Healy, Albert Mahler, Eugene Ramey, Tenors 

Alfred de Long, Clarence Reinert, Walter Vassar, Basses 

(Students of Mr. Connell) 

Collaborating 



Mr. Ellis Clark Hammann, at the Piano 



Casimir Hall 



yionday Evening, January 12, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



Aria: "I Rage" and i ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

ler than the Cherry ) 



I. 

A Warning Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

"She Never Told Her Love" Joseph Haydn 

Recitative and 

"O Ruddier than the Cherry' 

From "Acis and Galatea" 

Hai Luli Arthur Coquard 

L'Heure Exquise Reynaldo Hahn 

Erlkonig Karl Loewe 

11. 

Sechs Lieder von Gellert LuDWiG van Beethoven 

Bitten 

Die Liebe des Nachsten 

Vom Tode 

Die Ehre Gottes aus der Natur 

Gottes Macht und Vorsehung 

Busslied 

III. 

Recitative and Aria: "She alone charmeth my sadness" 

from "Irene". Charles-Fran gois Gounod 

IV. 

Peasant Cantata Johann Sebastian Bach 

for Soprano, Bass, and Chorus 



A Warning 



Ev'ry man is fond of dainties 

If he get his way; 

Tho' he court a maid he'll leave her, 

Prove himself a base deceiver. 

Can you greatly wonder, pray? 

Fair and fresh, and slim of waist, 

Maids are vastly to his taste! 

Eating sweets before one's mealtime 

Spoils the appetite. 

Many a maid, through fickle lover, 

Loses love she'll ne'er recover. 

Of this fact forgetful quite. 

Fathers all, take heed of this: 

Keep her close each pretty miss! 



''She Never Told Her Love" 

She never told her love. 

But let concealment, like a worm in the bud. 

Feed on her damask cheek. 

She sat, like Patience on a monument. 

Smiling, smiling at Grief. 



Recitative and Aria from 
"Acis and Galatea"" — 

"I Rage" and "O Ruddier 
than the Cherry" 

I rage, I melt, I burn. 

The feeble god has stabbed me to the heart. 

Thou trusty pine I 

Prop of my godlike steps, I lay thee by! 

Bring me a hundred reeds of decent growth 

To make a pipe for my capacious mouth; 

In soft enchanting accents let me breathe 

Sweet Galatea's beauty, and my love. 

O ruddier than the cherry! 

O sweeter than the berry! 
O nymph, more bright than moonshine night. 

Like kidlings, blithe and merry. 

Ripe as the melting cluster. 

No lily has such lustre. 
Yet hard to tame, as raging flame. 

And fierce as storms that bluster. 



Hai Luli 

Je suis triste, je m'inquiete, 
e ne sais plus que devenirl 
Mon bon ami devait venir 
Et je I'attends ici seulette. 
Hailuli! Hallulil Hailuli! 
Ah! qu'il fait triste, sans mon ami. 

Ah! s'il fst yrai, s'il fst vrai qu'il soit volage, 

S'il doit un jour m'abandonner, 

Le village n'a q'ua bruler 

Et moimSme avec le village! 

Hailuli Hailuli Hailuli 

A quoi bon vivre sans ami. 



( Translation) 

Hal Luli 

I am gloomy, I fret and worry, 
I cannot think which way to turn. 
My dearest love was here to be 
And I await him sad and lonely. 
HaTlulil Hailuli! Hailuli! 
How dismal 'tis without my love. 

If it be true, if's be true that he is fickel, 

Should he some day cast me from him. 

The whole village in flames will perish, 

I together with all the village! 

Hai'luli Hailuli Hailali 

How could I live without my love. 



L'Heure Exquise 



La_ lune blanche 
Luit dans les bois; 
De chaque branche 
Part une voix 
Sous la ram6e 
O bien aimfe. 

L'etang reflate, 
Profond miroir, 
La silhouette 
Du saule noir. 
Oil le vent pleure 
R^vons! c'est I'heure. 

Un vaste et tendre 
Apaisement, 
Semble descendre, 
Du firmament 

8ue I'astre irise 
'est I'heure exquise. 



(Translation) 

Perfect Hour 

The silv'ry moonlight 
Streams on the wood; 
O'er shimm'ring coverts. 
From ev'ry bough 
A voice is soaring, 
O well beloved! 

A faithful mirror. 

The pond reflects, 

A sombre willow's black silhouette. 

Where weeps the wind 

Fair dream ! oh, linger ! 

A tender calm. 

Infinite peace 

Droops from the moonbeams 

That opalesce 

The vault of heaven. 

Dwell, perfect hour ! 



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Erlkonig 



Wer reitet so spat durch Nacht und Wind? 
Es ist der Vater mit seinem Kind ; 
Er hat den Knaben wohl in dem Arm, 
Er fasst ihn sicher, er halt ihn warm. 

"Mein Sohn, was birgst du so bang dein 

Gesicht?" 
"Siehst, Vater, du den Erlkonig nicht?" 
"Den Erlenkonig mit Kron und Schweif?" 
"Mein Sohn, es ist ein Nebelstreif." 

"Du liebes Kind, komm, geh' mit mir! 
Gar schone Spiele spiel' ich mit dir; 
Manch' bunte Bluraen sind an dem Strand; 
Meine Mutter hat manch' gulden Gewand." 

"Mein Vater, mein Vater, und horest du nicht, 
Was Erlenkonig mir leise verspricht?" 

"Sei ruhig, bleibe ruhig, mein Kind; 
In durren Bliittern siiuselt der Wind." 

"Willst, feiner Knabe, du mit mir gehn? 
Meine Tochter sollen dich warten schon; 
Meine Tochter fiihren den niichtlichen Reihn 
Und wiegen und tanzen und singcn dich ein." 

"Mein Vater, mein Vater, und siehst du nicht 
dort 

Erlkonigs Tochter am diistem Ort?" 
"Mein Sohn, mein Sohn ich seh* es genau, 

Es scheinen die alten Weiden so grau." 

"Ich liebe dich, mich reizt deine schone Gestalt, 
Und bist du nicht willig so branch ich Gewalt." 

"Mein Vater, mein Vater, jetzt fasst er 
mich an! 
Erlkonig hat mir ein Leid's getani" 

Dem Vater grauset's; er reitet geschwind, 
Er halt in den Armen das iichzende Kind. 
Erreicht den Hof mit Miih und Not; 
In seinen Armen das Kind war tot. 



(Translation) 

Erlking 

O, who rides by night through the woodlands 

so wild? 
It is the fond father embracing his child: 
And close the boy nestles within his loved arm, 
From the blast of the tempest to keep himself 

warm. 

"O father, see yonder, see yonder," he says 
"My boy, upon what dost thou fearfully gaze?" 
"O 'tis the Erlking with his staff and his 

shroud." 
"No, my love, 'tis but a dark wreath of the 

cloud." 

"O wilt thou go v/ith me, thou dear child? _ 
By many gay sports shall thy hours be beguil'd; 
My mother keeps for thee full many a fair 

toy, 
And many fine flow'rs shall she pluck for my 

boy." 

"O father, my father, and did you not hear, 
The Erlking whispers so close in my ear?" 

"Be still, my lov'd child, be at ease, 
'Twas but the wild blast as it howls through 
the trees." 

"O wilt thou go with me, thou lov'liest boy. 
My daughters shall tend thee with care and 

with joy: 
They shall bear thee so lightly thro' wet and 

thro' wild, 
And hug thee, and kiss thee, and sing to my 

child." 

"O father, my father, and saw you not plain, 
Th' Erlking's pale daughters glide fast through 
the rain?" 
"O no, my heart's treasure, I knew it full soon. 
It was the grey willow that danc'd to the 
moon." 

"Come with me, no longer delay. 

Or else, silly child, I will drag thee away." 
"Oh, father! Oh, father! now keep your hold 

The Erlking has seiz'd me, his grasp is so 
cold." 

Sore trembled the father, he spurr'd through 

the wild. 
Clasping close to his bosom his shuddering 

child. 
He reaches his dwelling in doubt and in dread. 
But clasp' to his bosom the infant was dead. 



Bitten 

Gott, deine Giite reicht so weit, so weit die 

Wolken gehen, 
Du krunst uns mit Barmherzigkeit, und eilst, 

uns beizustehen. 
Herr, meine Burg, mein Fels, mein Hort, 

vernimm' mein Fleh'n, 
Merk' auf mein Wort, denn ich will vor dir 

beten ! 



(Translation) 

Prayer 

God, Thy goodness extends as far as the clouds 

may travel, 
Crownest us with mercy, and helpest us in 

trouble. 
Thou God, my salvation, my rock, my protector, 

hear my plea. 
Heed my word, then I will pray before thee. 



Die Liebe des Nachsten 

So jemand spricht: Ich liebe Gott, und hasst 

doch seine Briider, 
Der treibt mit Gottes Wahrheit Spott und 

reisst sie ganz darnieder. 
Gott ist die Lieb', und will, dass ich den 

Nachsten liebe gleich als mich. 



(Translation) 

Love thy Neighbor 

Thus spoke someone: I love God, though he 

hates his neighbor. 
He makes sport of God's truth and tears it 

asunder. 
God is love, and asks that I love my neighbor 

as myself. 



Vom Tode 

Meine Lebenszeit verstreicht, stiindlich eil' ich 

zu dem Grabe, 
Und was ist's, das ich vielleicht, das ich noch 

zu leben habe? 
Denk', o Mensch, an deinen Tod! Saume nicht, 

denn Eins ist ISoth! 



(Translation) 

Death 

My life span is ebbing, hourly I hurry toward 

the grave, 
And what is it, perchance that I still have in 

life? 
Think,_ oh man, upon thy passing 1 Delay not, 

for 'tis well for thy soul. 



Die Ehre Gottes aus der Natur 

Die Himmel riihmen des Ewigen Ehre, ihr 

Schall pflanzt seinen Namen fort, 
Ihn riihmt der Erdkreis, ihn preisen die Meere, 

vernimm', o Mensch, ihr gottlich Wort! 
Wer tragt der Himmel unzahlbare Sterne? Wer 

fuhrt die Sonn' aus ihrera Zelt? 
Sie komrat und leuchtet und lacht uns von 

feme, und lauft den Weg gleich als ein Held. 



( Translation) 

The glory of God is Nature 

The Heavens praise the Eternal Glory. 

They sound His name in triumph. 

The earth and the sea praise God, 

Hear, oh man, God's word ! 

Who carries the myriad stars through the 

Heavens ? 
Who guides the sun upon its course? 
It shines brightly and glares upon us from afar. 
And travels its course like a great hero. 



Gottes Macht und Vorsehung 

Gott ist mein Lied! Er ist der Gott der Starke, 
Hehr ist sein Nam' und gross sind seine Werke, 
Und alle Himmel sein Gebiet. 



(Translation) 

God's Power and Majesty- 
God is my song ! He is the God of Power, 
Holy is His name and great are His works. 
And all the Heavens His dominion. 



BussHed 

An dir allein, an dir hab' ich gesiindigt, 

Und libel oft vor dir getan; 

Du siehst die Schuld, die mir den Fluch 

verkiindigt, 
Sieh, Gott, auch meinen Jammer an! 
Dir ist mein Fleh'n, mein Seufzen nicht 

verborgen, 
Und meine Tranen sind vor dir, 
Ach Gott, mein Gott, wie lange soil ich sorgen? 
Wie lang' entf ernst du dich von mir ? 
Herr, handle nicht mit mir nach meinen 

Siinden, 
Vergilt mir nicht nach meiner Schuld. 
Ich suche dich, lass mich dein Antlitz finden, 
Du Gott der Langmuth und Geduld. 

Friih wollt'st du mich mit deiner Gnade fiillen, 

Gott, Vater der Barmherzigkeit. 

Erfreue mich um deines Namens willen; 

Du bist ein Gott der gern erf rent. 

Lass deinen Weg mich wieder freudig wallen 

Und lehre mich dein heilig Recht, 

Dein heilig Recht mich taglich thun nach 

deinem Wohlr^efallen; 
Du bist mein Gott, ich bin dein Knecht. 
Herr, eile, du mein Schutz, mir beizustehen, 
L'nd leite mich auf eb'ner Bahn! 
Er hort mein Schrei'n, der Herr erhiirt mein 

Flehen 
Und nimmt sich meiner Seele an ! 



(Translation) 

Hymn of Penitence 

Against Thee alone, against Thee have I sinned 

And evil have I done in Thy sight. 

Thou seest the wrong which brings Thy curse 

upon me 
Look also. Oh God, upon my misery, my 

distress. 
My prayers, my sighs are not hidden from 

Thee 
My tears well up before Thee 

God, my God, how long shall I consume 
myself in sorrow 

How long wilt Thou hide Thy face from me? 
Oh Lord, deal not w^ith me according to my 
guilt. 

1 search for Thee, let me see Thy face. 
Thou God of patience and long suffering 

Mayest Thou fill me early with Thy goodness. 
Oh God, Father of all mercy, make me glad for 

Thy name's sake. 
Thou art a God who taketh delight in giving 

joy. 
Let me journey gladly upon Thy way 
Teach me daily to keep "Thy holy law according 

to Thine own great pleasure. 
Thou art my God; I am Thy servant. 
Oh Lord my protector, hasten Thou to aid me 
Guide me upon level pathways. 
He heareth my cry ; the Lord doth harken unto 

my prayer and doth receive my soul. 



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Recitative and Aria: 

"She Alone Charmeth My Sadness" 

from "Irene" 

Recitative 
YesI she flies from me still! 
All is ready, the Imaums — the Santons — where 

is she? 
The fire burns in the fane, 
While the holy men wait. 
But the sacred fires wane. 

0, my love, why so late! 
Cruel one to forsake me! 

Thou mad'st me all thy love believe. 
But, ah! well thou know'st to deceive. 

Aria 
She alone charmeth my sadness, 
At her feet willing I lay my power and sceptre 
down. 

1, a King! oh, what madness! 
'Tis I who am the slave, 

'Tis she who wears the crown! 

Wake! oh wake from the spell, and be a King 

again! 
Too long thou pinest, heart, waiting her smile 

in vain. 
Throw her fetters away, be yet a King and 

reign! 
Sleeper awake. Ah, no. 
He dreameth still he loves thee, 
And he humbleth bis pride, 
But he gaineth a bride. 
Thee, his bride, his bride! 
She alone charmeth my sadness, — 



The Peasant Cantata 



"The text, by Picander, was actually his 
homage to von Dieskau upon the assumption 
by the latter of the lordship of the manor of 
Kleinzschocher, in August, 1742. It depicts 
the rejoicing of the peasants in the holiday 
which has been granted them in honor of the 
occasion. A pair of peasant sweethearts sing 
the praises of the new lord of the manor, make 
sundry allusions to the receiver of taxes, _ to 
the conscription of recruits, and end by going 
into the Inn to dance and make merry." 

It gave Bach evident pleasure, for once, to 
compose a secular work in a popular style 
almost throughout. The aristocratic element 
appears only in two arias — "Kleinzschocher 
would be, and today shnuld be," and "Thine 
increase be constant." Dance tunes predomi- 
nate in the vocal numbers. The opening and 
closing choruses are bourrt'-es; the arias, "Oh, 
but it is passing sweet," and, "Oh, Herr 
Schosser," are polonaises. "Fifty golden 
dollars," must be regarded as a mazurka, "O 
ever worthy and well born" is a sarabande, and 
"I'd have you know," is a rupeltanz, which 
offers a suggestion of intoxication in the dis- 
placements of the accent. 

The peasant finds his sweetheart's "genteel" 
aria, "Kleinzschocher would be, and should be," 
too affected, and answers with "Oh, ten thousand 
heavy gold ducats," which had been a popular 
song for about eighteen years when Bach wrote 
this cantata. It is still in popular use in 
Germany. The sweetheart replies with a folk 
cradle song, in "O fair one, oh, rare one." The 
most elaborate and courtly song in the work, 
"Thine increase be constant," was taken from 
Bach's earlier "Strife between Phoebus and 
Pan," where it serves as the prize song. The 
last chorus, in jolly folk-song strain, needs no 
explanation. 



Chorus: 
We have a fine new Master here, Our 

Chamberlain is he 
And heady is his good brown beer, as you 

may plainly see. 
The Parson he may angry be, come fiddlers! 

tune your string. 
See! Gretel's skirts do shake and wag! the 

little saucy thing. 

Bass Recitative: 
"Now Gretel, just one little kiss my dear!" 

Soprano Recitative : 
"If that were all, you bear! I know you well, 

my cunning master! 
You'd take a third and fourth still faster! 
Count Dieskau's eyes are sharp, so I am 

told" 

Bass Recitative : 
"Nay! but Mylord won't scold! He knows as 

well as we, and even better. 
How good it is to love!" 

Soprano Aria: 
"Oh! but it is passing sweet, when a pair 

of lovers meet. 
Then the heart, for joy entrancing, skips, 

like flies in sunshine dancing. 
And like buzzing wasps in nest is the turmoil 

in the breast!" 

Bass Recitative : 
"Mylord is right enough, but Schosser, a 

plague upon the man! 
He, like a flash! will tax us all he can, if 

we but take a pint of water for to wash!" 



The Peasant Cantata— Continued 



Bass Aria: 
Oh! Herr Schosser, do not be severe on us 

simple peasants living here. 
Spare our skins we pray! Tho you eat away, 

caterpillar like, both leaves and shoots, 
Oh! leave our roots!" 



Soprano Recitative: 
"That sounds too rough and rude! There 

are such pretty people there, 
I know full well, you'd set them all alaugh- 

ing as I should if I were to sing this good 

old fashioned air:" 



Soprano Recitative : 
"It stands confess'd that our good Lord is 
of _ the best, of gold he is we cannot 
weigh him, nor hope with many hopsacks 
full of farthings to repay him!" 

Soprano Aria: 
"Oh! our worthy and well loved Chamberlain, 
is an extinguished man, blame him no 
mortal can!" 

Bass Recitative: 
He helps us all, both young and old, and in 

your ear be't told : 
Did not our village come off light in the 

recruiting of last season?" 

Soprano Recitative: 
Our joy has yet a better reason: He makes 
our taxes all so slight!" 

Bass Recitative: 
And not an atom haughty is our Lady good. 
She is just one of us, a plain, rough piece 
of wood. She'll talk to us as frank and 
free as if she were the same as we. She's 
wise besides, and thrifty in her house, and 
for the sake of her good old spouse would 
change a bat, or mouse for dollars gladly!" 

Bass Aria: 

"Fifty golden dollars good in cold blood to 
eat and drink away is a thing that can's 
be stood if they come and pull our hair 
all day ! 

Well! what's gone, is gone for aye! If one 
in some other way can contrive to save 
the double, why for fifty dollars trouble?" 

Soprano Aria: 
"Kleinzschocher would be, and today should 
be, sweet as the almond kernel white. 
Today in our community may Peace, and 
Love and Unity o'erflow in blessings and 
delight." 

Bass Recitative: 
"That's too genteel for you, it smacks so of 
the city; we peasants never sing so pretty! 
Now listen, here's a ditty that suits me 
better far!" 

Bass Aria: 
Oh! ten thousand heavy gold ducats each day 

does the Chamberlain take! 
His thirst he does with good wine slake, and 

it does him right merry make!" 



Soprano Aria: 
"Oh fair one, oh rare one, oh beautiful wife! 
Long, long be thy life! 
And may it with riches and blessings be rife." 

Bass Recitative: 
"You're right, I ween! 
My song sounds somewhat mean 
Come, then ! I will endeavor 
To sing more grand and clever! 
Thine increase be constant 
And laugh with delight!" 

Soprano Recitative: 
"And now we've had enough of that!" 

Bass Recitative: 
"Then let me take my hat, and to our tavern 
speed." 

Soprano Recitative: 
"Which means, a song like this you need: 

Soprano Aria: 
"I'd have you all know it now is time to go 

and drink, sirs, to drink sirs. 
Who thirsty is, I think, sirs, may find an 

Inn close by. 
But should that beer deny, the next one will 

not shrink. 
Who is thirsty, I think, sirs, should to the 

right hand go, there they will find I know, 

good drink, sirs." 

Bass Recitative: 
"My love! you've guessed it!" 

Soprano Recitative : 
"And as we two have nothing more to do. 
So let us go with solemn step and slow 
unto our good old tavern!" 

Bass Recitative: 
"Hi! come you all away!" Herr Ludwig 
and the tax inspector, must drink today!" 

Chorus: 

We'll go now where the Dudelsack (bag- 
pipes), the Dudel, Dudel, Dudel, Dudel, 
Dudelsack, squeals in our well-loved Inn! 

And shout with voices loud and free, "Long 
live Count Dieskau's family." 

Whate'er he crave, that may he have. 

Health, wealth and all prosperity. 

We'll go now where the Dudelsack, the Dudel, 
Dudel, Dudel, Dudel, Dudel, Dudelsack 
squeals in our well-loved Inn! 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season— 1930-1931 



Seventh Faculty Ejecital 



FELIX sal:' 

HARRY 



, V ioloncellisf 
, &i ine Piano 



Casimir Hall 



tAonday Evening, January 19, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Cusltis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



'H' 



I. 

Adagio (from Organ Toccata in C major) JOHANN SEBASTIAN BaCH 

(Arranged for Mr. Salmond by the late Dr. Lynnwood Farnam) 

Sicilienne Paradis-Dushkin 

Air Tendre MondonvillE'Kaufman 

Minuet and Gavotte| Veracini-Salmon 

Gigue / 

II. 

Sonata, No. 5, in D major, Opus 102, No. 2 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio con molto sentimento d'affetto 

Allegro fugato 

III. 

Sonata, No. l, in E minor. Opus 38 JOHANNES BrAHMS 

Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto quasi menuetto 
Allegro 

IV. 

Elegie Gabriel Faure 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Prayer — "From Jewish Life" ErnEST BlOCH 

(dedicated to Mr. Salmond . . . AbraM ChaSINS 
(The Composer at the Piano) 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season — 1930-1931 



Eighth Faculty Recital 



MR. EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violimsf 

L. HARRY KAUFMAN at tte Piano 



Casimir Hall 



tAonday Evening, March 2, 1931 

at 8:2>0 o'c\oc\ 



The Stein WAY is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



t? 



I. 

Sonata in A major Max ReGER 

(for violin alone) 

Allegro con grazia 

Andantino 

Prestissimo 

Adagio from Concerto in D minor LUDWIG SpOHR 

Vivace Haydn-Auer 

11. 

Concerto, No. 3, in G minor JeNO HuBAY 

Introduction quasi fantasia — Scherzo 

Adagio 

Finale: Allegro con fuoco 



III. 

Air Tendre MondonvillE'Kaufman 

Pastelle Joseph Achron 

Valse SchuberT'Achron 

Concert Phantasy on RimskyKorsakov's 

"Le Coq d or" Efbiem Zimbalist 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 

SEVENTH SEASON— 1930-31 



Ninth Faculty Recital 



LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violimsf 

, V ioloncellisf 



T^hursday Evening, April 30, 1931 

at S.'iO oWoc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



Trio, No. 3, in C minor LUDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

for Piano, Violin and Violoncello 

Allegro con brio 

Andante cantabile con variasioni 
Menuetto: Quasi allegro 
Finale : Prestissimo 



II. 

Sonata, Opus 19, for Piano and Violoncello SeRGEI RaCHMANINOV 

Lento-Allegro moderato 
Allegro scherzando 
Andante 
Allegro mosso 



III. 



Trio in B major. Opus 8, 

for Piano, Violin and Violoncello 



Johannes Brahms 



Allegro con brio 
Scherzo: Allegro molto 
Adagio 
Allegro 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
SEVENTH SEASON— 1930-31 



Tenth Faculty Recital 



MR. JOSEF HOFMANN, Pianisf 



T^uesday Evening, "May 12, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



'Z? 



I. 

Sonata in F minor ROBERT SCHUMANN 

(Concerto without orchestra) 
Allegro 

Scherbo: Molto comodo 

Quasi variazioni (on a theme by Clara Schumann) 
Prestissimo possibile 



II. 

Sonata in C minor. Opus 111 LuDV/IG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Maestoso — Allegro con brio ed appassionato 
Arietta: Adagio molto semplice e cantabile 



III. 



Sonata in B minor. Opus 58 

Allegro maestoso 

Scherzo: Molto vivace 

Largo 

Finale: Presto non tanto 



.Frederic Chopin 



Mr. Hopmann uses the Steinway Piano 



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Concert 

by 

The Musical Art Quartet 



MR. SASCHA JACOBSEN, First Violm 

MR. PAUL BERNARD, Second Violin 

MR. LOUIS KAUFMAN, Viola 
MADAME MARIE ROEMAET-ROSANOFF, Violoncello 

Mr. H. Neidell, Violin 
assisting 

MR. HARRY KAUFMAN, Piano 
Collaborating 



Vs/ednesday Evening, March 11, 1931 

at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



casimir hall 
The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



* 



I. 

Quartet in C major. Opus ?4, No. 2 FraNZ JoSEPH HaYDN 

Vivace 

Adagio 

Menuetto : Allegretto 

Finale : Adagio — Presto — Adagio 

The Musical Art Quartet 



11. 



Quartet in D minor, Opus posthumous 

Allegro 

Andante con moto 

Scherzo: Allegro molto 

Presto 

The Musical Art Quartet 



.Franz Schubert 



III. 

Concert' in D major, for Piano, Violin 

and String Quartet ErnEST ChAUSSON 

Decide 

Sicilienne 

Grave 

Finale (Tres anime) 

Mr. Harry Kaufman, Piano Mr. Sascha Jacobsen, Solo Violin 

Mr. Paul Bernard, First Violin Mr. Louis Kaufman, Viola 

Mr. H. Neidell, Second Violin Madame Marie Roemaet'RosanoiF, Violoncello 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season— 1930-1931 

First Students' Concert 

'Wednesday Evening, J^ovemher 12, 1930 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Judith Poska, Violinist 

Graduate Student of Madame Luboshutz 

*Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

I. 

Sonata, No. 6, in E major George Frederic Handel 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 

II. 

Concerto in A minor, Opus 53 AnTON DvORAK 

Allegro, ma non troppo 
- Adagio, ma non troppo 
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo 

III. 

Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" WaGNER-WiLHELMJ 

Praeludium Bach-Kreisler 

Short Story Gershwin-Dushkin 

Valse Caprice Saint-Saens-Ysaye 

•Graduate Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Ste:nway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season— 1930-1931 



Second Students' Concert 

'Wednesday Evening, December 10, 1930 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Bachmann 
*SaiL'\ Newell at the Piano 



«^> 



I. Concerto No. 11 in G major, Opus 70 LoUIS SPOHR 

Adagio — ^Allegro vivace 

Adagio 

Rondo — Allegretto 

Marian Head 

II. Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Opus 44 MaX BruCH 

Adagio, ma non troppo 

Recitative 

Finale 

Frances Wiener 

III. Concerto No. 4 in D minor. Opus 31 HeNRI VieUXTEMPS 

Andante 

Adagio Religioso 
Finale Marziale 

Abe Burg 



•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



^5 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Seventh Season — 1930-31 



of 

Jeanne Behrend, Fianist 
Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 

Third Students' Recital 

Casimir Hall 
V\/ednesday Evening, January 14, 1931 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

PROGRAMME 



^i 



I. 

Variations in F minor Joseph Haydn 

Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. 1 
Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. 

Capriccio, Opus 76, No. 1 ) Johannes Brahms 

Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. 6 
Capriccio, Opus 76, No. 8 

II. 

Sonata in G minor. Opus 22 ROBERT SCHUMANN 

Presto 

Andantino 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 

Finale : Rondo— Presto 

III. 

Etude in C sharp minor. Opus 25, No. 7 ) 

Valse in A flat major. Opus 64, No. 3 > FREDERIC ChOPIN 

Etude in C minor. Opus 10, No. 12 ) 

La Cathedrale engloutie ) 

La serenade interrompue > Claude Debussy 

Feux d'Artifice ) 

Polonaise No. 2 in E major LiSZT'BuSONI 



The Steinway is the ofEcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

Seventh Season — 1930-31 

Fourth Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, January 20, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist 
*Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Sonata in E minor FRANCESCO VeRACINI 

Largo 
Menuet 
Gavotte 
Allegro 

Concerto in A minor. Opus 82 ALEXANDRE GlAZOUNOV 

ModeratO'AndantC'Allegro 
Jacob Brodsky 

II. 
Air de Lensky Tschaikowsky-Auer 

Variations on the Last Rose of Summer 

for violin alone Heinrich Ernst 

Philip Frank 

III. 

Concerto in E minor JULES CONUS 

Allegro moltO'Andante espressivcAllegro molto 
Paul Gershman 

IV. 

Scherzo'Tarantelle Henri Wieniawski 

Melodie Gluck-Kreisler 

Caprice No. 24 PaganinI'Auer 

Franklin Siegfried 

♦Graduate Student of Mb.. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Seventh Season— 1930-1931 

Students of 

Mr. Hofmann, Madame Luboshutz 
AND Madame Vengerova 

In Recital of 

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN'S TEN SONATAS 
FOR VIOLIN AND PIANO 

Casimir Hall 



First Concert: V^ednesAay Evening, March 4, 1931 

at 8:30 o'clock 

Second Concert: Tuesday Evening, March 10, 1931 

at 8:30 o'clock 

Third Concert: Tuesday Evening, March 17, 1931 

at 8:30 o'clock 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Fifth Students' Concert 

V/ednesday Evening, March 4, 1931 

Frogramme 



Sonata in G major. Opus 30, No. 3 LUDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro assai 
Tempo di minuetto 
Allegro vivace 

*Henry Siegl, Violinist 
** Yvonne Krinsky, Pianist 

II. ' 

Sonata in A major, Opus 12, No. 2 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio espressivo 

Allegro 

Poco allegretto 

*James Bloom, Violinist 
*** William Harms, Pianist 

III. 

Sonata in C minor. Opus 30, No. 2 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Allegro 

*Celia Gomberg, Violinist 
tjEANNE Behrend, Pianist 



*Student of Madame Luboshutz 
**Student of Madame Vengerova 
***Student of Mr. Hofmann 

fOraduate Student of Mr. Hofmann 



Sixth Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, March 10, 1931 

Programme 



Sonata in A major, Opus 30, No. 1 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro 

Adagio, molto espressivo 

Allegretto con variaaioni 

*James Bloom, Violinist 
**Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 

II. 

Sonata in E flat major. Opus 12, No. 3 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro con spirito 

Adagio con molt' espressione 

Allegro molto 

*Ethel Stark, Violinist 
***Florence Frantz, Pianist 

III. 

Sonata in A minor, Opus 23 LuOVv^G VAN BeETHOVEN 

Presto 

Andante scherzoso, piu allegretto 

Allegro molto 

*Henry Siegl, Violinist 
**Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 

IV. 

Sonata in D major. Opus 12, No. 1 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro con brio 
Tema con Variazioni 
Allegro 

t Judith Poska, Violinist 
** Joseph Levine, Pianist 



*Student of Madame Luboshutz 
**Student of Mr. Hopmann 
***Student of Madame Vengerova 
■fOraduate Student of Madame Luboshutz 



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Seventh Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, March 17, 1931 
VS' 



Frogramme 



I. 

Sonata in F major. Opus 24 (Spring) LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro 

Adagio molto espressivo 

Allegro molto 

Allegro ma non troppo 

*Celia Gomberg, Violinist 
**Jeanne Behrend, Pianist 

II. 

Sonata in G major. Opus 96 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio espressivo 

Allegro 

Poco allegretto 

*Ethel Stark, Violinist 
***Florence Frantz, Pianist 

III. 

Sonata in A major. Opus 47 (Kreutzer) LuDWIG VAN BeeTHOVEN 

Adagio sostenuto'presto 
Andante con variazioni 
Presto 

ttJuDiTH POSKA, Violinist 
tJosEPH Levine, Pianist 



*Student of Madame Luboshutz 
**Graduate Student of Mr. Hopmann 
•**Student of Madame Vengerova 

tStudent of Mr. Hofmann 
ttGraduate Student of Madame Luboshutz 



FIRST PROGRAMME 

Sonata in G major. Opus 30, T^o. 3 

The first movement is a festive and joyous piece written in sonata form. It 
is fascinating to watch Beethoven experiment with the sonata form. He uses it 
at least a hundred times in his works, very seldom employing exactly the same 
scheme, but always trying something new. In this instance the second subject 
is presented in D minor (instead of the required D major). The Minuetto has 
little of the dance; it is a melodious ideal type quasi minuetto. The Finale is a 
hearty and vigorous dance in the form of a Rondo. 

Sonata in A major, Ojpus 12, 7s[o. 2 

The first theme is of delicious simplicity and has an almost rustic touch. 
The second subject is presented in F sharp minor, but rapidly reaches its lawful 
key of E major through a series of modulations (G major, E minor, F major). 
The popular Andante in A minor is followed by a gracious Rondo. The whole 
sonata has the pastoral character of which Beethoven was so fond. 

Sonata in C minor, Ojpus 30, J^o. 2 

The key in which this work is written was a favourite one with Beethoven, 
and many of his most popular works are in this key. It stands next to E flat 
major in the composer's preference. The French writer, Marcel Herwegh, pre 
poses the following programme for the whole work. 

The first movement represents to him a battlefield with the hero wounded 
and suffering (first subject) while the army is led to victory in new battles 
(second subject). In the second movement the hero's complaints are heard in 
a tender song of suffering. The third and fourth movements represent the 
soldiers and the populace rejoicing after the victory. 

e--*^ C^-S C«K9 



SECOND PROGRAMME 

Sonata in A major, Ojpus 30, 7^o. 1 

This work is of a character entirely difi^erent from the one in C minor. 
As much as the latter is heroic and brilliant, the former is pastoral and more 
in the style of chamber music. 

The beautiful and quiet Adagio in D major is followed by a theme with 
variations. The theme, a very simple song form in two parts, has six variations. 
The last variation in 6/8 time is a kind of barcarolle, enlarged, and may be 
considered a Finale. 

Sonata in E flat major, Opus 12, T^o. 3 

Here the classic tradition is recognizable more than in any of the other 
sonatas. The work is less like Beethoven, but still it possesses an exquisite 
charm. The first movement and the Rondo are very brilliant. In its ornamenta- 
tion the Adagio in C major reminds one of the slow movements of Mozart and 
Haydn. 

Sonata in A minor. Opus 25 

The opening Presto in 6/8 time is very unusual as the first movement of a 
sonata and has almost the character of a Finale. Its rhythm suggests that of a 



tarantella. The second movement is also in sonata form, a procedure not un- 
usual with Beethoven (compare piano sonatas. Opus 31, No. 3, Opus 106 and 
many others). The Finale is a Rondo whose middle parts form a beautiful con- 
trast with the main theme. 

Sonata in D major. Opus 12, ?<io. 1 

The three sonatas, Opus 12, show much less originality than other works of 
Beethoven composed at approximately the same time (for instance the three 
sonatas. Opus 10 for the piano, not to speak of the Sonate Pathetique) . Still he 
was much criticized by his contemporaries for these violin sonatas. He was told 
they were too complicated, while we enjoy them for their utter simplicity. 

The treatment of the variations is somewhat similar to that employed by 
Beethoven in the Trio, Opus 1, No. 3. The first movement and the Rondo are 
good healthy D major compositions, full of vigor. 



6~*0 C^KS <>KS 



THIRD PROGRAMME 

Sonata in F major. Opus 24 (Spring) 

The "Spring Sonata" is, next to the "Kreutzer", probably Beethoven's most 
popular vioHn sonata. Usually in a sonata, the first theme is energetic and of a 
decided rhythmic character, while the second theme is melodious and so forms 
the necessary contrast. In the first movement of the F major sonata, the pre 
cedure is reversed. The beautiful B flat major Adagio is followed by a very 
short Scherzo — Ught and, with its running scales in the trio, a little mysterious. 
The Rondo has a carefree happiness, which is almost unique among Beethoven's 
works. I know of only two others of his compositions which possess the same 
quahty — the Rondos from the piano sonatas, Opus 7 and Opus 22. 

Sonata in G major. Opus 96 

This sonata, the last written for the two instruments, is already in many of 
its features akin to Beethoven's last works and as such is very different from the 
earlier violin sonatas. The second theme of the first movement has a marked 
similarity to the trio of the Scherzo of the same sonata. The Adagio is of 
romantic beauty while the variations which form the finale, differ very much 
from those of the Sonatas, Opus 30, No. 1 and Opus 12, No. 1. The theme 
on which they arc written is a transfiguration of a popular tune of the time. 

Sonata in A major. Opus 47 (Kreutzer) 

This sonata is the best known of the series and little need be said about 
it. Its finale was written long before the other two movements, which were 
composed in a very short time (Ries says in a couple of days). Czerny men' 
tions that in the first movement Beethoven made use of a theme from one of 
Kreutzer's compositions. This has never been proved, as probably no one has 
had enough courage to verify it by searching through the twenty or more operas 
and innumerable other compositions, which were cilready completed at that time 
by the proUfic French professor. 

Programme Notes by BoRis Goldovsky 



^.^ 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-31 

Eighth Students' Concert 

"Wednesday Evening, March 18, at 8:10 o'c\oc\ 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist 
*Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Concerto in A major, No. 5 WoLFGANG AmaDEUS MoZART 

Allegro aperto 

Adagio 

Tempo di menuetto 

Allegro 

Iso Briselli 

II. 

Symphonie espagnole Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante 

Allegro 

Felix Slatkin 

III. 

Poeme Ernest Chausson 

Carmela Ippolito 

IV. 

Concerto in D minor FREDERICK StOCK 

Prelude: Molto moderato 
Adagio: Molto tranquillo 
Finale: Allegro ma non troppo 

OSKAR ShUMSKY 

•Graduate Student of Mr. K.\ufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o^ Music 



I 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930'31 

Ninth Students' Concert 

"Wednesday Evening, "March 25, 192)1, at S:2>0 o'c\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Salzedo 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Gavotte from "The Temple of Glory" Jean-Philippe Rameau 

1683-1764 

Giga APv.CANGELO CORELLI 

16?8'1713 

Theme and Variations Josef Haydn 

1732-1809 

Bourree Johann Sebastian Bach 

Flora Greenwood 1685-1750 

II. 

Impromptu-Caprice Gabriel Pierne 

Chanson de Guillot-Martin Harmonized by A. Perilhou 

En Bateau Claude Debussy 

Victoria Murdock 

III. 

Five Poetical Studies Carlos Salzedo 

Flight 
Mirage 

Idyllic poem 
Inquietude 
Communion 
Mary Griffith 

IV. 

Impromptu Gabriel Faur6 

Alice Chalifoux 

V. 
Introduction and Allegro Maurice Ravel 

(with piano accompaniment) 

Reva Reatha 
Carlos Salzedo at the Piano 

Lton and Healy Harps 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-31 



Tenth Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, March 30, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Meiff 

«^» 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Sonata in E minor, Opus 27, No. 4 EuGENE YsAYE 

for Violin alone 

Allemanda: Lento maestoso 
Finale: Presto ma non troppo 

Charles Jaffe 

II. 

Fantasia' Appassionata, Opus 3 ? Henri Vieuxtemps 

Allegro Fiocco-Bent-O'Neill 

Frederick Vogelgesang 
*Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 

III. 

Fantasy on the Themes of the Opera "Tiefland" d'AlbERT-MeIFF 

Nathan Snader 
♦Florence Frantz at the Piano 

IV. 

First Movement from the Concerto No. 9, LOUIS SpOHR 

in D minor. Opus 55 

Allegro 

Scherzo'Tarentelle Henri Wieniawski 

Harold Kohon 
*EuGENE Helmer at the Piano 

V. 

First Movement from the Concerto in A minor, Opus 28. .CaRL GoLDMARK 

Allegro moderato 

Charles Jaffe 
*Florence Frantz at the Piano 

*Student of Mr. K.^ufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 19 30' 31 

Eleventh Students' Concert 

Wednesday Evening, April 1, 1931 at 8:30 o'c\oc\ 
By Students of Mr. Salzedo and Miss Lawrence 

Concert oj Music for Ten Harps 
in Orchestral Formation 

William Cameron Mary Jane Mayhew 

Alice Chalifoux Victoria Murdock 

Flora Greenwood Reva Reatha 

Mary Griffith Maryce Robert 

Isabel Ibach Marjorie Tyre 

Conducted by Carlos Salzedo 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Pavane Unknown Composer 

XVI century 

Gavotte Padre Gl\mbattista Martini 

1706-1784 

Sarabande Francois Couperin 

1668-1733 

La Joyeuse Jean-Philippe Rameau 

1683-1764 

n. 

Fraicheur ) Carlos Salzedo 

Recessional ) 

III. 

Fanfare "\ 

Cortege f Carlos Salzedo 

La Desirade i 

Chanson dans la nuit / 

IV. 
La Cathedrale engloutie Claude Debussy 

Lyon d Healt Harps 
The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

Seventh Season — 1930'31 

Twelfth Students' Concert 

"Monday Evening, April 13, 1931 at S:ZO oc\oc\ 

Students of Mr. Bachmann 
♦Florence Frantz at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I. 
Sonata in A minor Pasquali-Ysaye 

Largo— Ardito tempo moderato 
Minuetto: Molto moderato 
Presto giocosamente 

First Movement from the Italian Concerto .Mario CastelnuovO'Tedesco 

in G minor 

Allegro maestoso 

Lily Matison 

II. 

Concerto in D major. Opus 61 LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Allegro ma non troppo 
Larghetto 
Rondo: Allegro 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 



♦Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o^ Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-31 

Thirteenth Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, April 14, 1931 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Dr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

*^« 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

String Quartet in F major. Opus 18, No. 1 LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio alfettuoso ed appassionato 

Scherzo— Allegro molto 

Allegro 

Paul GershmanJ^. j. Leon Frengut, Viola 

Philip Frank \ '^ *"* Frank Miller, Violoncello 

II. 

Trio in E flat major, WOLFGANG AmADEUS MoZART 

Kochel No. 498, for 
Piano, Clarinet and Viola 

Andante 

Menuetto 

Allegretto 

Jennie Robinor, Piano 
James Collis, Clarinet Max Aronoff, Viola 

ni. 

Quintet in F minor, Opus 34, for Piano, JOHANNES BrAHMS 

and String quartet 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante, un poco adagio 

Scherzo 

Finale (Poco sostenuto) -Allegro non troppo 

Joseph Levine, Piano 
Gama Gilbert (,/. j. Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip \ '" '"* Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930'31 

Fourteenth Students' Concert 

Thursday Afternoon, April 16, J 93 J at 4 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Torello 
*Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Sonata in A major JOHANN GaLLIARD 

Lento 1687-1749 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegro 

Irven Whitenack 
11. 

l^'^^^ I Emile Rate2 

Arabesque \ 

Frank Eney 

III. 

Gavotte Lorenzitti 

Le Papillon Caix d'Hervelois 

Irven Whitenack lo/u-. 

IV. 
Sonata in G major Jean D'Andrieu 

Preludio 168^1740 

Allegro 

Aria 

Adagio-Gavotte 

Gigue 

Theme, Variations et Fugue EmILE RatEZ 

Oscar Zimmerman 

V. 

Danza Satanica (First Performance) ISAIA BiLLE 

Introduction et Tarentelle C. Franchi 

Jack Posell 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of Thf. Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season— 1930-31 

Fifteenth Students' Concert 

Wednesday Evening, April 22, 193J at S:iO odoc\ 
Students of Madame Vencerova 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Prelude from the English Suite in A minor . . Johann Sebastian Bach 

First Movement from the Concerto LuDWiG van Beethoven 

in C major. Opus 15 

Allegro con brio 

Sol Kaplan 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Florence Frantz) 

II. 

Variations serieuses. Opus 54 Felix Mendelssohn 

Etude in C sharp minor, Opus 10, No. 4 Fr^D^RIC ChOPIN 

Zadel Skolovsky 

III. 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach-Tausig 

Nocturne in D flat major. Opus 27, No. 2 FrEd6riC ChOPIN 

Etude in E major, No. 5 PaGANINI-LiSZT 

Louise Leschin 

IV. 

Nocturne in F sharp minor. Opus 48, No. 2 Fr6d6rIC ChOPIN 

Lesghinka (Caucasian Dance) SeRGEI LiaPOUNOFF 

Eugene Helmer 

V. 

Suite for Two Pianos, Opus 17 SeRGEI RaCHMANINOFF 

Introduction 
Valse 
Romance 
Tarantella 

Louise and Joana Leschin 

The Steinway ig the official piano of The Curtis Institute o\ Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930'31 

Sixteenth Students' Concert 

Thursday Afternoon, April 23, 1931 at 4 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Salmond 

PROGRAlvlME 

I. 

Adagio and Allegro LuiGi Boccherini 

Variations Symphoniques, Opus 23 Leon Boellman 

Orlando Cole 
Florence Frantz, at the Piano 

11. 

Sonata in G minor. No. 1 GeORGE FrEDERIC HaNDEL 

Grave-Allegro 
Sarabande-Allegro 

First Movement from the Concerto in D minor Edouard Lalo 

Lento-Allegro maestoso 

Helen Gilbert 

Joseph Rubanoff, at the Piano 

III. 

Two Movements from the Concerto in B flat major . . .LuiGi Boccherini 

Adagio 

Allegro moderate 

Katherine Conant 

Florence Frantz, at the Piano 

IV. 

Two Movements from the Concerto in D major, No. 2 . .Joseph Haydn 

Adagio 
Allegro 

Frank Miller 
Florence Frantz, at the Piano 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 19 30' 31 

Seventeenth Students' Concert 

Friday Evening, April 24, 1931 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Saperton 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Organ Fantasy and Fugue Johann Sebastian Bach 

in G minor in the Liszt Adaptation 

Jorge Bolet 

II. 

Variations serieuses, Opus ?4 Felix Mendelssohn 

Florence Fraser 

III. 

El Puerto ) jg^c Albeniz 

ElAlbaicinJ Rosita Escalona 

IV. 

Waldesrauschen / ^ .Franz Liszt 

Fantasia quasi Sonata : "Apres une Lecture du Dante" ) 

Jorge Bolet 

V. 

Feux d'Artifice Claude Debussy 

Toccata Maurice Ravel 

JeaN'Marie Robinault 

VI. 

First Movement from the Concerto Camille Saint-Saens 

in G minor, Opus 22 

Lilian Batkin 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Irene Peckham) 

VII. 
First Movement from the Concerto Anton Rubinstein 

in D minor, Opus 70 

Jeanette Weinstein 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by THEODORE Saidenberg) 

VIII. 

First Movement from the Concerto Sergei Rachmaninoff 

in C minor, Opus 18 

Irene Peckham 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by JoRGE Bolet) 

IX. 

Rhapsodic Espagnole LiszT-BusoNi 

JeaN'Marie Robinault 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Jorge Bolet) 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-1931 



Eighteenth Students' Concert 



Students of 
MR. DE GOGOR2A 



}Aonday Evening, April 21 , 1931 

at 8:30 o'c\oc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



Programme 



Tf 



I. 



Recitative and Aria: "Diane impitoyable" Christophe Gluck 

from "Iphigenie en Aulide" 

Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
Accompaniment played by Miss Winslow 



II. 

O del mio dolce ardor Christophe Gluck 

Die beiden Grenadiere Robert Schumann 

Abrasha Robofsky, Baritone 
Accompaniments played by MiSS WiNSLOW 

III. 

"Ritoma vicitor!" from "Alda" Giuseppe Verdi 

Phillis Has Such Charming Graces Old English 

arranged by Lane Wilson 

"Un bel di, vedremo" from "Madama Butterfly" GlACOMO PUCCINI 

Agnes Davis, Soprano 
Accompaniments played by MisS WiNSLOW 

IV. 

"Quando le sere al placido" from "Luisa Miller" Giuseppe Verdi 

Mattinata RuGGiERO Leoncavallo 

^ FiORENZO Tasso, Tenor 
Accompaniments played by Miss WiNSLOW 



v. 

Waldesgesprach \ 

Die Stille I 

Mondnacht i 

Widmung / 

Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
Accompaniments played by Joseph Rubanoff* 



Robert Schumann 



(ivir. Thibault and Mr. Tasso v»rere indisposed and did not sing, 
(■^-EdY^ard Ilane sang a group oi songs.) 



Programyne 



T? 



VI. 

Duet : "Solenne in quest 'ora giurarmi dovete" Giuseppe Verdi 

from "La Forza del Destino" for Tenor and Baritone 

FiORENZO Tasso, Tenor 
Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
Accompaniment played by Miss Winslow 



VII. 
"Hear Me, Ye Winds and Waves!" George Frederic Handel 

from "Scipio" 

Gia i\ sole dal Gange Alessandro Sc.'mLATTi 

Gesang Weyla's Hugo Wolf 

Were You There Negro Spiritual 

Benjamin de Loache, Baritone 
Accompaniments played by Elizabeth Westmoreland* 



VIII. 



Duet: "Ciel! mio padre!" from "Aida" Giuseppe Verdi 

for Soprano and Baritone 

Agnes Davis, Soprano 
Abp..'\sha Robofsky, Baritone 
Accompaniment played by Miss WiNSLOW 



•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 



W 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-1931 

Nineteenth Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, April 28, 1931 at 8:2)0 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Josef Hofmann 

«^» 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Chaconne in D minor Bach-Busoni 

*First Movement from the Concerto .... Peter II jitch Tschaikowsky 
in B flat minor 

Andante non troppo e molto maestoso 
Joseph Levine 

II. 

Funerailles Franz Liszt 

Capriccio in G minor. Opus 116, No. 3 JOHANNES BraHMS 

Capriccio in F minor ErnST VON DOHNANYI 

Martha Halbwachs 

III. 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach-Tausig 

Nocturne in F major, Opus 15, No. 1 FREDERIC ChoPIN 

Minstrels Claude Debussy 

Variations serieuses, Opus 54 Felix Mendelssohn 

William Harms 

IV. 

*ConcertO in E flat minor SeRGEI LiAPOUNOFF 

Allegro con brio 
Adagio non tanto 
Allegro moderato e maestoso 
Nadia Reisenberg 



•Mr. Harry Kaufman has kindly offered to play the orchestral part 
on a second piano. 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o^ Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-31 



Twentieth Students' Concert 



Students of 
MADAME SEMBRICH 

Prepared by 

MADAME QUEENA MARIO 

Sylvan Levin, at the Fiano 



Friday Evening, May I, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



'H' 



I. 

II mio bel foco Benedetto Marcello 

Zur Ruh, zur Ruh! Hugo Wolf 

Hans und Liesel Franz von Woyna 

Over the Steppe Alexander Gretchaninoff 

"Voce di donna" from "La Gioconda" Amilcare Ponchielli 

Ruth Gordon, Contralto 

II. 

"Ah! che amando era feHce" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from "11 Seraglio" 

Heimkehr RiCHARD Strauss 

MandoHne Joseph Szulc 

The Fountain Harriet Ware 

The Mad Scene from "Lucia di Lammermoor" GaETANO DoNIZETTI 

(Assisted by Ardelle Hookins,* Flautist) 
Henriette Horle, Soprano 

III. 

Lioubava's Recitative and Aria Nicholas Rimsky-Korsakoff 

from "Sadko" 

O Charm Me, Charm (In Russian) ALEXANDER Dargomyschsky 

Christ Has Risen (In Russian) Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Lullaby (In Russian) ALEXANDER GrETCHANINOFF 

In Ardent Moments of Your Heart (In Russian) Reinhold Gliere 

Vera Resnikoff, Soprano 

IV. 

Recitative and Duet for Soprano and Contralto: 

"Questo duol che si v'affanno" from "Martha" Friedrich von Flotow 

Henriette Horle, Soprano 
and RuTK Gordon, Contralto 



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Programme 



TS' 



V. 

"Non so piu cosa son, cosa faccio" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from "Le Nozze di Figaro" 

Serenata Johannes Brahms 

"Regnava nel silenzio"from "Lucia di Lammermoor". .GaETANO DonIZETTI 

The Sleep that FHts on Baby's Eyes John Carpenter 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano 

VI. 

Habanera from "Carmen" Georges Bizet 

Die junge Nonne Franz Schubert 

Be it Bright Day (In Russian) Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

No Longer Jean Kursteiner 

"La mamma morta" from "Andrea Chenier" Umberto Giordano 

Genia Wilkomirska, Dramatic Soprano 

VIL 

"Mi tradi queH'alma ingrata" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from "Don Giovanni" 

Shir Haroeh Samuel Alman 

Hebrew Melody JOSEPH AcHRON 

Wer hat dies Liedlein erdacht? Gustav Mahler 

"Emani, involami" from "Ernani" Giuseppe Verdi 

Mildred Cable, Dramatic Soprano 



♦Student of Mr. Kincaid 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 19 30' 31 



TWENTY=FIRST STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
MR. CONNELL 



'Monday Evening, IsAay 4, 1931 

at S:iO o'docX 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Frogramme 



Tf 



I. 

"Sorge infausta una procella" from "Orlando" George Frederic Handel 

The Happy Lover Old English 

Arranged by Lane Wilson 
"Avant de quitter ces lieux" from "Faust" Charles Gounod 

Alfred de Long, Bass-Baritone 
♦Elizabeth Westmoreland, at the Piano 

IL 

"La fleur que tu m'avais jetee" from "Carmen" Georges Bizet 

Minnelied Johannes Brahms 

La Caravane Ernest Chausson 

(Organ accompaniment played by **Donald Wilcox) 

Eugene Ramey, Tenor 

♦Elizabeth Westmoreland, at the Piano 

in. 

Zueignung Richard Strauss 

O Mistress Mine Arthur Sullivan 

"Vision fugitive" from "Herodiade" JULES MaSSENET 

Walter Vassar, Baritone 
*YvoNNE Krinsky, at the Piano 

IV. 
"II mio tesoro intanto" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from "Don Giovanni" 

Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer Johannes Brahms 

Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Richard Wagner 

Albert Mahler, Tenor 
♦Elizabeth Westmoreland, at the Piano 



(Ivonne Krinsky ill. Sylvan Levin substituted) 



Programme 



'Z? 



V. 

"Porgi, amor" from "Le Nozze di Figaro". .WoLFGANG AmADEUS MoZART 

Happiness Richard Hageman 

Senta's Ballad from "Der Fliegende Hollander" RlCH.\RD WaGNER 

Florence Irons, Soprano 
*YvoNNE Krinsky, at the Piano 



VI. 

The Minstrel Boy j 

The Meeting of the Waters / 

The Young May Moon / 

Molly Bawn I 

Tm Not Myself at All ) 

Daniel Healy, Tenor 
♦Elizabeth Westmoreland, at the Piano 



.Old Irish 



VII. 

"Adieu, forets" from "Jeanne d'Arc" PeTER IljitCH TsCHAIKOWSKY 

The Sea Has Covered Her Face Edith Braun 

(Dedicated to Mary Louise Curtis Bok) 
Meine Liebe ist griin Johannes Brahms 

Rose Bampton, Contralto 
*YvoNNE Krinsky, at the Piano 

VIII. 
Alto Rhapsodie and Male Quartette Johannes Brahms 

Rose Bampton, Contralto 

Albert Mahler and Eugene Ramey, Tenors 

Alfred de Long and Walter Vassar, Basses 

Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 



•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
••Student of the late Dr. Farnam 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930-31 

Twenty. SECOND Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, May 5, 1931, at 8:30 o'doc\ 
Students of Mr. Tabuteau, in Wind Ensemble 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Petite Symphonie for Flute, Two Oboes, Two Clarinets, 

Two French Horns and Two Bassoons ChARLES GoUNOD 

Ada gio— Alle gretto 
Andante cantabile 
Scherzo: Allegro moderato 
Finale: Allegretto 

Kenton Terry \ Flutes Attillio de Palma"\ 

John Hreachmack / Henry Whitehead Vt; l tr 

Sidney Divinsky ) oboes Harry Berv >trench Horns 

IsADORE GoLDBLUM ) SuNE JoHNSON / 



Robert Hartman 
Emil Schmachtenberg 



Jy->i . . William Santucci ) „ 

Clarinets Andrew Luck i ^."soons 



n. 

Second Movement from the Trio in C major, Opus 87, 

for two Oboes and EngHsh Horn LuDWIG VAN BeETHOVEN 

Adagio 

Arno Mariotti 

III. 

Chanson et Danses, Opus 50, for Flute, Oboe ViNCENT D'InDY 

two Clarinets, two Bassoons and French Horn 



Isadorr Goldblum ) Qf-n,, RoBERT Hester, English Horn 



Ardelle Hookins, Flute William Santucci) 

IsADORE Goldblum, Oboe Andrew Luck ) 

Theodore Seder, French Horn 



Bassoons 

James Collis ) clarinets 
Leon Lester ) 

IV. 

First and Second Movements from the Sonata, 

No. 1, for Oboe and Piano GeORGE FreDERIC HaNDEL 

Adagio 
Allegro 
Harold Gomberg, Oboe Harlow Mills, Piano 

V. 

Serenade in E flat major. Opus 7, for two Flutes, 
two Oboes, two Clarinets, two Bassoons, four 

French Horns and Bass Clarinet RiCHARD StRAUSS 

Emil Opava ) F,„jg, William Santucci ) Bassoons 

Kenton Terry ) Andrew Luck j 

Isadore Goldblum ) oboes Theodore Seder "J 

Sidney Divinsky ) Sune Johnson VFrench Horns 

James Collis ) clarinets ^arry Berv ( 

Robert Hartman J Attillio de Falma/ 
Felix Meyer, Bass Clarinet 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



PLAYS AND PLAYERS 

Seventh Season — 1930-31 



TWENTY=THIRD STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 

KIR. WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

in Operatic Acting 



Monday Evening, May 11, 1931 

at 8:30 o'chc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Ctirtis Institute of Music 



Programme 

I. 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY 

Text by LuiGi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, 

founded on the book of John Luther Long 

and the drama of David Belasco 

(In Italian) 
Music by GiACOMO PucciNi 

ACT THREE 

Cho'Cho'San Agnes Davis 

Su2iuki Ruth Gordon 

Kate Pinkerton Carol Deis 

B. F. Pinkerton Albert Mahler 

Sharpless Benjamin De Loache 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 

n. 

AIDA 

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni, from the French 
of Camille du Locle 

(In Italian) 

Music by Giuseppe Verdi 

ACT TPiREE 

Aida Genia Wilkomirska 

Amneris RoSE Bampton 

Radames Fiorenzo Tasso 

Amonasro Benjamin Grobani 

Ramfis Alfred de Long 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 



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Programme 



^CS 



III. 

LOHENGRIN 

Text and Music by Richard Wagner 
(In German) 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT TWO 

Elsa of Brabant Marie Edel 

Ortrud Edwina EusTis 

Telramund Abrasha Robofsky 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 

IV. 

MARTHA 

Text by Jules Vernoy, Marquis St. Georges and 
Wilhelm Riese 

(In Italian) 

Music by Friedrich von Flotow 

ACT TWO 

Lady Harriet Durham. Helen Jepson 

Nancy Rose Bampton 

Lionel Albert Mahler 

Plunkett Alfred de Long 

Lord Tristan Benjamin De Loache 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 



Stage Director: Mr. Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 
Musical Director and Conductor: Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

*Student or Mr. Emil Mlynarski in Conducting 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



PLAYS AND PLAYERS 
Seventh Season — 1930'31 



Twenty-fourth Students' Concert 



Students of 

MR. WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

in Operatic Acting 



Wednesday' Evening, 'May 13, 1931 

at 8:2)0 o'clock^ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



Programme 

TS' 

I. 

LOHENGRIN 
Text and Music by Richard Wagner 

(In German) 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT THREE 

Elsa of Brabant Mildred Cable 

Lohengrin Albert Mahler 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

IL 

PAGLIACCI 

Text and Music by Ruggiero Leoncavallo 

(In ItaHan) 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT ONE 

Canio FioRENZO Tasso 

Nedda Marie Buddy 

Tonio Abrash a Robofsky 

Silvio Walter Vassar 

Beppe Albert Mahler 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 



m. 

AIDA 

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni, from the French 

of Camille du Locle 

(In ItaHan) 

Music by Giuseppe Verdi 
Aria from Act One 

Aida Elsa Meiskey 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 



Programme 

IV. 

AIDA 

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni, from the French 
of Camille du Locle 

(In Italian) 

Music by Giuseppe Verdi 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT TWO 

Aida Marie Edel 

Amneris Rose Bampton 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 

V. 

LE NOZZE DI FIGARO 

Text by Lorenzo da Ponte, founded on the 
comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais 

(In Italian) 

Music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT ONE 

Count Almaviva Abr.\sha Robofsky 

Susanna Natalie Bodanskaya 

Cherubino Inez Gorman 

Marcellina Paceli Diamond 

Bartolo Alfred de Long 

Basilio Eugene Ramey 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 



Stage Director: Mr. Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 
Musical Director and Conductor: Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

♦Student or Mr. Emil Mlynarski in Conducting 



ifr^ F"' iiiiiiiillini l iMl i miTiMiiririiiiiiii 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



PLAYS AND PLAYERS 
Seventh Season — 19 30' 31 



TWENTY-FIFTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 

MR. WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

in Operatic Acting 



'Thursday Evening, "May 14, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

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Programme 
I. 

FAUST 

Text by Jules Barrier and Michel Carre, 
founded upon Goethe's drama 

(In French) 

Music by Charles Gounod 

ACT TWO 

Marguerite Selma Amansky 

Martha Edwina Eustis 

Faust Eugene Ramey 

Mephistopheles Alfred de Long 

Siebel Ira Petina 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

II. 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA 

Text by Giovanni TargionpTozzetti and Guido Menasci, 
founded on the story by Giovanni Verga 

(In Italian) 

Music by Pietro Mascagni 

FRAGMENT 

Santuz^a Florence Irons 

Lucia Kathryn Dean 

Lola Ira Petina 

Turiddu Fiorenzo Tasso 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 



Programme 
III. 

FAUST 

Text by Jules Barbier and Michel Carre, 

founded upon Goethe's drama 

(In French) 

Music by Charles Gounod 

ACT THREE SCENE ONE 

Marguerite Henriette Horle 

Mephistopheles Alfred de Long 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

IV. 

CARMEN 

Text by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halevy, 

adapted from the novel by Prosper Merimee 

(In French) 

Music by Georges Bizet 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT ONE 

Carmen Genia Wilkomirska 

Don Jose Eugene Ramey 

Mr. Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 

V. 

THE BARTERED BRIDE 

Text by Karla Sabina 

(In German) 

Music by Friedrich Smetana 

FRAGMENT FROM ACT TWO 

Marie Marie Edel 

Wen2,el Albert Mahler 

Thirty members of the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

Stage Director: Mr. Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 
Musical Director and Conductor: Mr. Sylvan Levin* 

*Student of Mr. Emil Mlynarski in Conducting 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

Seventh Season — 1930'31 

TVVENTY-SIXTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Friday Evening, May 15", 1931 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Miss VAN Emden 
*JosEPH RuBANOFF, at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

"Tre canzoni" for Soprano and String Quartet IldEBRANDO PiZZETTI 

Selma Amansky, Soprano 
The Casimir Quartet 

•*Paui, Gershman X ■yr. 1. **Leon Frengut, Viola 

**Philip Frank ) vwnns •♦Fr^nk Miller. Violoncello 

II. 

"Pace, pace, mio Dio" from "La Forza del Destine" GlUSEPPE VerDI 

Das Madchen spricht / t t. 

Liebestreu \ Johannes Brahms 

Paroles maternelles Gustavo Morales 

Hymne au soleil Alexandre Georges 

Selma Amansky, Soprano 

III. 
Die Allmacht ) t? « 

LachenundWeinenl--; Franz Schubert 

"Do Not Go, My Love" Richard Hageman 

Moon Marketing Powell Weaver 

Arioso from "La mort de Jeanne d'Arc" HERMANN BeMBERG 

Kathryn Dean, Contralto 

IV. 

An Chloe Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

My Lovely Celia. (Old English) George Monro 

Arranged by Lane Wilson 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

"Se saran rose" LuiGi Arditi 

Irene Singer, Soprano 

V. 

In the Silent Night Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Traume Richard Wagner 

Friihlingszeit Reinhold Becker 

"Ozean! Du Ungeheuer!" from "Oberon" Carl Maria von Weber 

Paceli Diamond, Soprano 

VI. 

Scene from "Cavalleria Rusticana" PlETRO MaSCAGNI 

Paceli Diamond, Soprano, Irene Petina, Soprano 
and ***Albert Mahler, Tenor 

♦Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
♦♦Student of Dr. Bailly in Chamber Music 
***Student of Mr. Connell 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930'31 



TWENTY=SEVENTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Monday Evening, May IS, 1931 at 8:30 oc\oc\ 

Students of Dr. Bailly in Viola 

♦Florence Frantz, at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Chaconne Tommaso Vitali 

Max Aronoff 

II. 

Concerto, Opus 20 Jeno Hubay 

(In one movement) 

Leon Frengut 

III. 

Concerto, Opus 107 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Rondo (Cadenza by Rosario Scalero) 

Leonard Mogill 
IV. 

Sonata in F minor. Opus 120, No. 1 JOHANNES BraHMS 

Allegro appassionato 
Andante un poco adagio 
Allegro grazioso 
Vivace 

Max Aronoff 



•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 1930'31 



TWENTY=EIGHTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
MADAME VENGEROVA 



Tuesday Evening, May 19, 1931 

at 8:i0 o'c\oc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 

I. 

Italian Concerto Johann Sebastian Bach 

Allegro animato 
Andante molto espressivo 
Presto giojoso 

Selma Frank 

II. 

Prelude and Fugue in A minor Bach-Liszt 

Pictures at an Exposition Modeste Moussorgsky 

(Edited by Harold Bauer) 

Promenade Children Quarrelling at Play 

The Gnome The Ox'Cart 

Promenade Promenade 

The Troubadour Chicks 

The Great Gates to Kieff 
SoNiA Hodge 

III. 

Reflets dans Teau Claude Debussy 

Moment musical in E flat minor Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Etude in F sharp major. Opus 7, No. 4 IgOR STRAVINSKY 

JOANA LeSCHIN 

IV. 



Berceuse J 



Valse in D flat major. Opus 64, No. 1 \ FREDERIC ChOPIN 

First Movement 1 

from the Concerto in E minor. Opus lly 
Allegro maestoso 
Cecille Geschichter 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Florence Frantz) 

V. 

Second and Third Movements Frederic Chopin 

from the Concerto in E minor, Opus 1 1 

Romance : Larghetto 
Rondo: Vivace 
Bella Braverman 
(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Yvonne Krinsky) 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Seventh Season — 19 30' 31 

TWENTY=NINTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 

V^ednesday Evening, May 20, 1931 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Madame Luboshutz 

and Miss Poska, Assistant to Madame Luboshutz 
*EuGENE Helmer, at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Ciaccona Tommaso Vitali 

Laura Gripping 

11. 

First Movement from the Concerto Carl Goldmark 

in A minor, Opus 28 

Allegro moderate 
Eva Stark 

III. 

Sonata, No. 6, in G major WoLFGANG AmADEUS MoZART 

Allegro con spirito 
Allegretto 
Eugene Orloff 
**SoL Kaplan, at the Piano 

IV. 
First Movement from the Concerto Charles de Beriot 

in G major, Opus 76 

Allegro maestoso 
Eugene Orloff 

V. 

Havanaise Camille Saint-Saens 

Hora Staccato Dinicu-Heifetz 

Laura Gripping 

VI. 
Symphonic espagnole Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Andante 
Rondo: Allegro 
Ethel Stark 

•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
**Student of Madame Vengerova 

The Steinway is the oflScial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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"PROGRAM 



Symphony, No. 2, in D major Johannes Brahms 

Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto grazioso 
Allegro con spirito 

Concerto in D minor, for Piano and Orchestra Anton Rubinstein 

First Movement (Moderate assai) 

Joseph Levine 

Overture-Fantasy — '"Romeo and Juliet" Peter I. Tschaikovsky 

Prelude a "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune". . . . ) ^, , >-, . 

' I Claude Debussy 

Nocturne — "Fetes" J 

Aria — "Vesti la giubba" from "Pagliacci" — for Tenor and Orchestra. .Riiggiero Leoncavallo 

FlORENZO Tasso 

Overture to "Rienzi" Richard Wagner 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 

"Presents 
THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Conaucfor : 



assisted by 

SYLVAN LEVIN, Conductor 
JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianist 

NATALIE BODANSKAYA, Soprano 



Lyric Theatre 
Baltimore 



Sunday Evening, February Eighth 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



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PROGRAM NOTES BY OLIN DOWNES, 

Musical Critic of The New York Times. 

SYMPHONY NO. 2, IN D MAJOR JOHANNES BRAHMS 

In this symphony Brahms is the poet of the green and beautiful earth. There are 
striking analogies between the First and .Second symphonies of Brahms and the Fifth and 
Sixth of Beethoven. The Fifth of Beethoven, the First of Brahms, are in the same key 
— C minor — and both works, romantic in essence, hymn the same theme, that of man's 
victorious struggle against fate. There is even a considerable similarity in the methods of 
the two composers in these particular works. There is the further fact that after delivering 
themselves, through long and heroic lalior, of two colossal masterpieces these composers of 
the early and the late nineteenth century apparently underwent the same creative reactions : 
they turned to gentler and lovelier themes than those which had absorbed them, and, each 
within a year, created new symphonic works distinguished by captivating spontaneity and by 
lyrical charm and feeling. 

Beethoven completed his Fifth Symphony in 1807 and his Sixth, the "Pastoral", in 
1808. Brahms' C minor symphony saw the light in 1876. In the following year he com- 
I)leted the Second Symphony, which is as surely his "Pastoral" as the Sixth is Beethoven's. 
But here coincidences cease. Brahms, in his Second Symphony, remains the symphonist 
unalloyed, and composes with a substance and elaborateness of development which draw him 
even closer than the First Symphony did to the ideals of classical structure in the musi- 
cal art. Beethoven, however cautiously he approached the matter, is actually in the "Pas- 
toral" Symphony a tone-painter, looking toward the new horizon of impressionism, painting 
with a few simple and broad strokes his symphonic sketch of the country-side. Brahms' 
-score is an epitome of simplicity but also of the profound, thoroughly worked-out, logical 
evolution of musical ideas. And there is a deeper note in this lovely and poetical score, of 
which the true (juality is not concealed, but revealed in its superb workmanship, namely, the 
earnest, melancholy, compassionate reflection upon life in the second movement, which ap- 
peared scholastic and involved to most of Brahms' contemporaries. 



The first movement (Allegro non troppo, 3-4) has as its basic melodic motive a short 
phrase of four notes, played immediately by 'celli and basses, and answered, over the last 
note, by the dusky and romantic first theme played by the horn. The four-note theme 
flowers forth, after the dark chord of the trombones, in a passage given to the first violins. 
It forms the principal material of the movement until the 'celli announce the second singing 
theme, under murmurous accompaniments of other instruments, in F sharp minor. A re- 
markable rhythmic transformation of the basic motive (cjuasi ritenuto) leads to the brilliant 
"codetta" of the opening movement — the brilliant motive given the string choir, over the puls- 
ing accompaniment figure of the horns. The development section begins with the first two 
notes of the horn theme in the key of F major, with answers by different instruments of 
the orchestra. It ends, after much resourceful manipulation, with the same two notes, 
sounded in the same key, fortissimo. A simple modulation — sharping the F — into the 
"tonic" D major, brings the recapitulation. The coda, in which the haunting song of the 
horn is heard, then the pizzicato of the strings, and fragments of the motive from flutes, 
oboes, horns and trumpets — is sheer beauty surpassed in few symphonies of man's making. 

The second movement (Adagio con troppo, 4-4) begins with the broad melody of the 
'celli. It is an impassioned reverie, couched in the grave and noble terms characteristic of 
Brahms. This movement, formerly little understood, is today neither abstruse nor obscure, 
but one of the most characteristic and impressive utterances in Brahms' orchestral music. 

The third movement (Allegretto, 3-4, 2-4, 3-4, 3-8, etc.) replaces the customary sym- 
phonic minuet or scherzo, and is of a pastoral sort, commencing with the bewitching air of 
the oboe, accompanied by strings pizzicato, and later transformed rhythmically. There are 
changes of pace as well as rhythmical accent, and the movement ends with a backward glance, 
as it were, of the lilting oboe phrase, and a rejoinder, "piano" and "pianissimo," of strings. 

The fourth movement (Allegro con spirito. 4-4) opens with an eflfect very customary 
with Brahms, a theme which creeps quickly and mysteriously through the low registers of 
the string choir, later developed by wind instruments and full orchestra. There are a num- 
ber of the rhythmical changes in which Brahms delights, sudden alternation of groups of 
triplets against two quarter-tones, and lustry sforzandos, two-fisted explosions of force and 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 

Presents 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

CoUucCor: EMIL MLYNARSKI 
assisted b^; 

SYLVAN LEVIN, Conductor 
JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianist 

NATALIE BODANSKAYA, Soprano 



Lyric Theatre 
Baltimore 



Sunday Evening, February Eighth 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



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joy. The violins, in a low register, chant a tlieme of more sustained character. This theme 
is taken up at the last by brass and wind, and the ending is as an apostrophe to hill and 
valley, forest and windswept sky. Of this symphony Brahms, writing to Billroth, said: "I 
do not know whether I have a pretty symphony; I must inquire of learned persons." 



FIRST MOVEMENT, MODERATO ASSAI, FROM PIANO CONCERTO IN D 

MINOR ANTON RUBINSTEIN 

The first movement of Rubinstein's most popular piano concerto is very charactertistic 
of the style of the composer and virtuoso. The energetic first theme is announced by the 
orchestra, then delivered, after some bravura octave and chord passages, with lordly power, 
by the piano. Passage work leads to the lyrical second theme, given the piano. The or- 
chestra announces a sub-theme, and against it the piano plays arpeggiated figures. Free 
development. A curtailed restatement, with amplified piano passages. A dramatic piano 
cadenza, based on the first theme and a very brilliant conclusion. 



OVERTURE-FANTASY, "ROMEO AND JULIET". . . .PETER I. TSCHAIKOVSKY 

The "Romeo and Juliet" overture was the first of Tschaikovsky's orchestral composi- 
tions to cross the Russian border and win him recognition in Europe. Von Biilow, who 
later introduced Tschaikovsky's B flat minor piano concerto in America, was quick to recog- 
nize its individuality and merit. The overture was written at the suggestion of Mili Bala- 
kireff, for a time friend and mentor of Tschaikovsky, as well as the group of young men 
then known as "The Five". But the emotional origin of this overture would furnish rich 
food for the sentimentalists who like their music romanticized. This was nothing less than 
Tschaikovsky's unhappy love for the young and beautiful opera singer, Desiree Artot. The 
two met in 18()8. The singer apparently returned Tschaikovsky's aflfection, but ultimately 
jilted him for a baritone. Kashkiii relates thit after tliis debacle the unfortunate composer 
attended an opera performance in which Desiree took part, and watched her, tears rolling 
down his cheeks, eyes glued to an opera glass. 



J 



i 



The story of the roles that certain women played in Tschaikovsky's life — his futile 
courtship of Artot ; his strange marriage to a woman who was discovered, too late, to be 
sub-normal and a half-wit; his long and platonic friendship with Mme. Mathilde von Meek, 
who generously financed Tschaikovsky, though always from a distance, and with the under- 
standing that they should never meet — this story would make a strange and fascinating one, 
especially for the psychologist and physiologist. Whatever the details of the tangled history, 
we know that the heart-break over Artot did directly aflfect the music of the "Romeo and 
Juliet" overture, and this with results very profitable to Tschaikovsky's art. In fact, if the 
overture were all of Artot and not at all of the officious BalakirefT, it might stand as one 
of Tschaikovsky's most finished compositions, instead of the somewhat uneven creation that 
it is. For in this overture is the long-phrased, sensuous love-melody, one of the most beau- 
tiful and affecting that Tschaikovsky ever conceived. This melody is heard after the yearn- 
ing, mounting dissonances of the introduction, the evocative sweeps of the harp, the chorale- 
motive associated with the thought of Friar Lawrence, and the noisy music of the strife of 
the two houses. The yearning theme is first given to the cor Anglais and muted violas, 
later to other solo instruments, while a sobbing horn supplies a feature of the accompani- 
ment. This theme in its first statement is connected with another exquisite passage — a pas- 
sage, many feel, miraculously Shakespearian— the whispering music of the muted strings, for 
the scene in which the lovers watch the davwi from Juliet's chamber. At last the love theme 
is apotheosized. The wind instruments sing a requiem for the tragically fated pair. 



FRfiLUDE A L'APRfiS-MIDI D'UN FAUNE CLAUDE DEBUSSY 

The Prelude to "The Afternoon of a Faun" (after the ficlogue of Stephane Mallarme) 
had its first performance in Paris, December 23, 1894. In spite of occasional opposition or 
misunderstanding at first, it won appreciation with singular swiftness from those to whom 
the epochal work revealed new, undreamed-of vistas, a world of richly variegated and in- 
describable tonal beauties. Few could resist its vernal freshness and drowsy shimmer . . . 
its tonal spectrum now suffused with faint mists of tender yearning or weary melancholy, and, 
again, radiantly drenched with the glow of pulsing ecstasy. Furthermore, one may also dis- 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 
Presents 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

ConJuc£or: EMIL MLYNARSKI 

assisted b3' 

SYLVAN LEVIN, ConJucior 

JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianist 

NATALIE BODANSKAYA, Soprano 



Lyric Theatre 
Baltimore 



Sunday Evening, Febrimry Eighth 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



■^^ffi 



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cover and contemplate here the cryptic genius that underlies the enchantment of Debussy's 
throbbing flood of tone, tlie sureness of art which breathes vitahty into this provocative tissue 
of half-veiled articulations: for in this first and most spontaneous of Debussy's wr.rks for 
orchestra, one measures the quintessential magic of his seemingly effortless genius. 

L'Aprh-Midi d'un Faunc is a conspicuous instance of the French tone-poet's rapport 
with literary art, particularly that in which concepts hover close below, but rarely emerge 
above, the level of clearly defined expression. Debussy's song-settings of Baudelaire, Ver- 
laine, and others, and his newly begun effort to translate into music the crepuscular 
shadows of Maeterlinck's Pelleas ct Mclisande, were but links in the progression which 
led him to conceive this Prelude as "a very free illustration" of Mallarme's celebrated 
poem, first published eighteen years earlier (in 1876). Debussy volunteered the following 
clue to the "pretensions" of his score: 

"It projects a changing background for the dreams and desires of the Faun in the heat 
of that summer afternoon, as, weary from pursuing the frightened Nymphs and Naiads, 
he falls into a wine-drugged sleep, free at last to enjoy every bounty that he had craved 
of Nature." 

And there is no need for a more amplified or detailed literary program. Perhaps to en- 
joy this music most richly, it is sufficient simply to yield ourselves up to its potent alchemy, 
and, like the Faun — half in wonderment, half in divination, be transported by the sheer 
physical beauty of its evocations : the languorous melancholy of the meditative flute, the 
plangent shimmer of harp-tones, brooding muted horns, murmurous and lucent, ardent accents 
of livelier oboe and clarinet, the ravishing iridescence of high strings played pianUsimi in 
octaves, darts of shining silver struck from anti(|ue cymbals ... By such communion with 
each strand in the Debussyan web may we perhaps be vouchsafed timeless glimpses into this 
necromancer's secret of imperishable beauty ! 



NOCTURNE NO. 2— FfiTES CLAUDE DEBUSSY 

Debussy's two Nocturnes — Nuages and Fetes — were first performed at a Lamoureux 
concert in Paris, December 9, 1900. (A third Nocturne, Sirencs, made its appearance in 
the following year.) These pieces, so cunningly made, so transparently conceived, illuminate 
very strikingly Debussy's relations to painters of his period, as L'Aprcs-Midi d'un Faunc 
and similar works show the influence of botli thought and form exerted upon him as com- 
poser by the leading French poets of his day. In Fi-tcs Debussy miraculously depicts a 
dance of light and air, interrupted momentarily by the pagan processional which passes like 
the sun on his triumphal march through the heavens. 

"Fetes: movement, rhythm, dancing in the atmosphere, with bursts of brusque light. 
There is also the episode of a procession (a dazzling and wholly idealistic vision) pass- 
ing through the festival and blended with it ; but the main idea and substance obstinately 
remain — always the festival and its blended music — luminous dust participating in the 
universal rhythm of all things." 

These words, credited to Debussy, typical of his mind, outline in a characteristic way the 
intention of this extraordinary orchestral picture. It captures gossamer moods ; it transfixes 
the elusive vision . . . the passing moment . . . for eternity. 



ARIA— "VESTI LA GIUBBA" FROM "PAGLIACCI" 

.... RUGGIERO LEONCAVALLO 

Ruggiero Leoncavallo, in his adventurous youth a Wagnerian, attempted, without suc- 
cess, to emulate Wagner by the composition of tragic music-dramas and a trilogy ba,sed on 
the period of the Rennaissance. In these projects he signally failed. In 1891, stirred, per- 
haps, by the success the preceding year of Mascagni's realistic "Cavalleria Rusticana", he 
recalled an actual drama which he had witnessed as a young man in a courtroom over which 
Leoncavallo's father, a judge, presided. A Calahrian player, member of a travelling troupe, 
was brought to justice for a murder committed in earnest during a [lerformance in which 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 
Presents 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Conducfor : E 



assisted b}? 

SYLVAN LEVIN, ConJucfor 
JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianise 
NATALIE BODANSKAYA, Soprano 



Lyric Theatre 
Baltimore 



Sunday Evening, February Eighth 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



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he had taken part. Jealousy was the motive ; as the man was led away he cried out that he 
had no regrets and would do the deed again if the situation were before him. 

Leoncavallo composed his own libretto for "Pagliacci" with the memory of that episode 
in mind. (He was accu.sed of thieving from Mendes' "Femme de Tabarin", but wrongly.) 
The air, "Vest! la giubba", is sung by Canio in the first act. He learns that the play in 
which he will act tonight to amuse the villagers is a reflection of the situation which con- 
fronts him in his life— the clandestine aflfair of his wife and Silvio, another player. Before 
the curtain which is to rise that evening upon his crime, he cries out against the fate, which 
compels him, with the other puppets, to laugh while his heart is breaking. 



OVERTURE TO "RIENZI" RICHARD WAGNER 

"Rienzi" was composed when Wagner was 25 years old. The libretto was fashioned 
from the historical romance of Bulwer-Lytton. The opera, being the most immature, con- 
ventional and least significant of all Wagner's major works for the stage, had an immediate 
success, one which astonished the composer himself, who, frightened to death, had feared to 
show him.self in the theatre at the premiere (Dresden, October 20, 1842). "Rienzi", the 
opera, is today a museum piece, occasionally revived for its historical interest. The overture 
has more vitality, containing everything which is most vital in the opera, and some of the 
things that are not. It furnishes abundant proof nf Wagner's growing mastery of form 
and instrumentation, and his consuming dramatic temperament. The sustained A which 
opens the piece is the summons to revolt. The strings answer with the theme of Rienzi's 
prayer. In a faster movement the orchestra breaks out fortissimo with the Romans' chorus 
to the day of freedom. Trombones in unison, fortissimo, intone the theme of the battle 
hymn, "Sancto spirito cavaliere". A lyrical passage for the 'celli hints broadly at the later 
Wagner of "Tristan". A facile, jingling theme is taken from the finale of the second act 
of the opera. These themes are developed, repeated, stated in various sequence. The end is 
triumphant. 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 
Presents 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Conductor: EMIL MLYNARSKI 

assisted by 

SYLVAN LEVIN, ConJuceor 
JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianisf 
NATALIE BODANSKAYA, Soprano 



Lyric Theatre 
Baltimore 



Sunday Evening, Fehnmry Eighth 

at 8:30 o'doc\ 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 
Presents 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
CoUvLcioT- EMIL MLYNARSKI 

assisted by 

SYLVAN LEVIN, Conduceor 

JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianist 

NATALIE BODANSKAYA, Soprano 



Lyric Theatre 
Baltimore 



Sunday Evening, Febrixary Eighth 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, composed of one 
hundred one students of The Curtis Institute of 
Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is augmented for 
this occasion by four professionals, all of whom are 
faculty members of the Institute. 



Programme 

Symphony, No. 2, in D major. JOHANNES BrAHMS 

Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto grazioso 
Allegro con spirito 

Concerto in B flat minor for Piano and Orchestra . PeTER I. TSCHAIKOWSKY 

First Movement (Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso) 

♦Joseph Levine 



INTERMISSION 



Symphonic Poem — "Die Toteninsel" Sergei Rachmaninov 

♦♦Conducted by Sylvan Levin 

Symphonic Tone-Poem — ''Don Juan" Rich.^rd Str.-\uss 

Aria — "Si, mi chiamano Mimi," from "La Boheme" . GlACOMO PUCCINI 
for Soprano and Orchestra 

♦♦♦Natalie Bodanskaya 

Overture to "The Bartered Bride" Friedrich Smetana 



•Student of Me.. Josep Hofmann 
••Student of Mr. Emil Mltn-.\rski in Conducting 
•••Student of Mad.^me M\rcella Sembrich 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



PERSONNEL OF STUDENT ORCHESTRA 



First Violins 
Philip Frank 
James Bloom 
Iso Briselli 
Jacob Brodsky 
Paul Gershman 
Gama Gilbert 
Celia Gomberg 
Laura Griffing 
Robert Levine 
Lily Matison 
George Pepper 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Henry Siegl 
Ethel Stark 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Frances Wiener 

Second Violins 
Jack Pepper 
Abe Burg 
David Cohen 
Maurice Cramer 
Robert Gomberg 
Marian Head 
Charles JafFe 
Morris Marcus 
Raphael Silverman 
Fehx Slatkin 
Nathan Snader 
Jean Spitzer 
Eva Stark 
Avram Weiss 
Leona Wolson 
Eva Young 

Violas 
Max Aronoff 
Simon Asin 
Gabriel Braverman 
Leon Frengut 
Samuel Goldblum 
Arthur Granick 
George Humphrey 
Virginia Majewski 
Leonard Mogill 
Robert Warlsurton 
Garry White 



Violoncellos 

Frank Miller 
Grace Bazell 
Orlando Cole 
Katherine Conant 
Samuel Geschichter 
Helen Gilbert 
Victor Gottlieb 
Josephine Herrick 
Howard Mitchell 
Bernard Olasov 
Brunetta Peterson 
Florence Williams 



Basses 

Oscar Zimmerman 
Frank Eney 
Harold Garratt 
Jack Posell 
*Anton Torello 
Carl Torello 
WilHam Valentine 
Irven Whitenack 



Harps 

Edna Phillips 
Victoria Bloom 
Flora Bruce Greenwood 
Mary Griffith 



Flutes 

John Hreachmack 
Ardelle Hookins 
Emil Opava 
Maurice Sharp 
Kenton Terry 



Ohoes 

Isadore Goldblum 
Robert Bloom 
Sidney Divinsky 
Robert Hester 



Clarinets 
James CoHis 
Leon Lester 
Robert Hartman 
Fehx Meyer 
Emil Schmachtenberg 

Bassoons 
WilHam Santucci 
*Ferdinand Del Negro 
Andrew Luck 
WiUiam Pohsi 

Horns 
Theodore Seder 
Jack Berv 
Harry Berv 
Attillio de Palma 
*Anton Horner 
Sune Johnson 

Trumpets 
John Schuler 
*Sol Cohen 
George Halbwachs 
John Harmaala 
Samuel Krauss 
Leopold Podder 

Trombones 
Guy Boswell 
J. Warren Burkhart 
Gerald Woerner 

Tuba 
Ross Wyre 

Tympani 
Frank Schwartz 

Battery 

Lloyd C. Geisler 
Salvatore Perrone 
Frank Sinatra 



*Members of the faculty of The Curtis Institute of Music. 



Local Management: William A. Albaugh 

Concert Manager for The Curtis Institute of Music: Richard Copley, 

10 East 43rd Street, New York. 




THE 

CURTIS INSTITUTE 

OF MUSIC 



Presents 



The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 



Conductor: EMIL MLYNARSKI 

assisted bv 
Carmela Ippolito, Violinist 
Conrad Thibault, Baritone 



CONSTITUTION HALL 
WASHINGTON 



IS/londay Afternoon, February l^inth 

at 4:30 o'clock 




^^m^mMimm^mm$%i 




Mary Louise Curtis Bok 
President 




Josef Hofmann 
Director 



Camera portraits by Albert Petersen 





^3 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 

HE Curtis Institute of Music was founded in 1924 by Mary 
Louise Curtis Bok, with an endowment of $12,500,000. The 
expressed purpose of the Institute is to hand down the tradi' 
tions of the past through contemporary masters and to teach 
students to build on this heritage for the future. 

The beautiful buildings of the Institute, situated in the heart of 
Philadelphia's finest residential district, are replete with works of art, 
and the artistic atmosphere thus created is a constant source of inspira' 
tion to teachers and students alike. 

In accordance with the policy set by Mr. Josef Hofmann, Director, 
every student is a scholarship holder. In addition to free tuition, for all, 
provision is made for financial aid if warranted. 

Foremost musicians compose the faculty — such as Josef Hofmann, 
Director and Head of the Piano Department; Madame Marcella Sem' 
brich, Efrem Zimbalist, Emilio de Gogorza, Lea Luboshutz;, Felix SaL 
mond, Louis Bailly, Harriet van Emden, Horatio Connell, Carlos SaL 
^edo, Emil Mlynarski, Rosario Scalero and other noted musicians. 

The Institute owns a collection of rare instruments for the use of its 
students, both for study and public appearances. 

Every facility is provided for a well-rounded musical education. In 
addition to major subjects, instruction is given in allied branches. Tickets 
for important musical performances in Philadelphia and New York City 
are presented to the students free of charge. 

To enable qualified students to appear regularly in public, The 
Curtis Institute has embarked in fields hitherto untouched by a school of 
music. In addition to concerts in Casimir Hall, the concert auditorium 



of the Institute, concerts are being given by artist-students before music 
clubs, civic organi2,ations, colleges, and universities. Among these ap' 
pearances, concerts at the University of Delaware, Bryn Mawr College, 
Western Maryland College, New Jersey College of Women, and many 
other schools and clubs have been arranged. The regular weekly broad- 
casts by Curtis students are a national feature of the Columbia Broad- 
casting Company during the school year. No less than twenty-four 
students have been engaged by the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 
to appear in eighteen operas during the year 1930-31, filling ninety roles 
of varied importance. 

Other major concert activities of The Curtis Institute have included 
the inauguration of a series of free chamber music concerts at the Penn- 
sylvania Museum of Art, Philadelphia; concerts by the Curtis Symphony 
Orchestra in Philadelphia, New York City, Boston, Baltimore and Wash- 
ington, with artist-students as soloists; and appearances of the Swastika 
Quartet in New York City, Philadelphia, Boston and Washington. 
Artist-students of the Institute have been engaged for appearances with 
the Chautauqua Grand Opera Association, at the Worcester Festival, 
and in several concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Within the last 
two years fifteen students of The Curtis Institute have been accepted by 
Leopold Stokowski as members of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Thirty-three states and twelve foreign countries are represented in 
the student body. Though its span of existence has been brief, the Insti- 
tute has already produced musicians of note. Among those who have 
won recognition are: Shura Cherkassky, Abram Chasins, Louise Lerch, 
Henri Temianka, Tibor de Machula, Wilbur Evans and Helen Jepson. 
Leading schools of music have selected graduates of the Curtis Institute 
to head various departments; and orchestras throughout the country have 
welcomed Curtis students as members. 



Programme 



Symphony, No. 2, in D major JOHANNES Brahms 

Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto grazioso 
Allegro con spirito 

Concerto in D major, for Violin and Orchestra Peter I. Tschaikowsky 

First movement (Allegro moderate) 
Carmela Ippolito 



INTERMISSION 



Symphonic Tone-Poem— "Don Juan" Richard Strauss 

Aria "Diane impitoyable" from "Iphigenie en Aulide" 

for Baritone and Orchestra Christophe Willibald Gluck 

Conrad Thibault 

Overture to "The Bartered Biide" Friedrich Smetana 



The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, composed of one hundred one 
students of The Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, is augmented for this occasion by four professionals, 
all of whom are faculty members of the Institute. 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



PERSONNEL OF STUDENT ORCHESTRA 



First Violins 
Phibp Frank 
James Bloom 
Iso Briselli 
Jacob Brodsky 
Paul Gershman 
Gama Gilbert 
Celia Gomberg 
Laura Griffing 
Robert Levine 
Lily Matison 
George Pepper 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Henry Siegl 
Ethel Stark 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Frances Wiener 

Second Violins 
Jack Pepper 
Abe Burg 
David Cohen 
Maurice Cramer 
Robert Gomberg 
Marian Head 
Charles Jaffe 
Morris Marcus 
Raphael Silverman 
Felix Slatkin 
Nathan Snader 
Jean Spitzer 
Eva Stark 
Avram Weiss 
Leona Wolson 
Eva Young 

Violas 
Max Aronoff 
Simon Asin 
Gabriel Braverman 
Leon Frengut 
Samuel Goldblum 
Arthur Granick 
George Humphrey 
Virginia Majewski 
Leonard Mogill 
Robert Warburton 
Garry White 



Violoncellos 

Frank Miller 
Grace Bazell 
Orlando Cole 
Katherine Conant 
Samuel Geschichter 
Helen Gilbert 
Victor Gottlieb 
Josephine Herrick 
Howard Mitchell 
Bernard Olasov 
Brunetta Peterson 
Florence Williams 



Basses 

Oscar Zimmerman 
Frank Eney 
Harold Garratt 
Jack Posell 
*Anton Torello 
Carl Torello 
William Valentine 
Irven Whitenack 



Harps 

Edna Phillips 
Victoria Bloom 
Flora Bruce Greenwood 
Mary Griffith 



Flutes 

John Hreachmack 
Ardelle Hookins 
Emil Opava 
Maurice Sharp 
Kenton Terry 



Oboes 

Isadore Goldblum 
Robert Bloom 
Sidney Divinsky 
Robert Hester 



Clarinets 
James Collis 
Leon Lester 
Robert Hartman 
Felix Meyer 
Emil Schmachtenberg 

Bassoons 
WiUiam Santucci 
*Ferdinand Del Negro 
Andrew Luck 
William Polisi 

Horns 
Theodore Seder 
Jack Berv 
Harry Berv 
AttilHo de Palma 
*Anton Horner 
Sune Johnson 

Trumpets 
John Schuler 
*Sol Cohen 
George Halbwachs 
John Harmaala 
Samuel Krauss 
Leopold Podder 

Trombones 
Guy Boswell 
J. Warren Burkhart 
Gerald Woerner 

Tuba 
Ross Wyre 

Tympani 
Frank Schwartz 

Battery 

Lloyd C. Geisler 
Salvatore Perrone 
Frank Sinatra 



•Members of the faculty of The Curtis Institute of Music. 



Local Management: Mrs. Wilson-Greene. 

Concert Manager for The Curtis Institute of Music: Richard Copley. 

10 East 43rd Street, New York 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

GOODHART HALL 

Monday Evening, February 23, 1 93 1 , at 8.20 o'clock 
THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Emil Mlynarski, Conductor 

assisted by 

Louis Vyner, Conductor 
Carmela Ippolito, Violinist 
Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
Mildred Cable, Soprano 



PROGRAMME 



Symphony, No. 2, in D major - - - Johannes Brahms 

Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto grazioso 
Allegro con spirito 

Concerto in E minor for Violin and Orchestra - Felix Mendelssohn 

First movement (Allegro molto appassionato) 

• Carmela Ippolito 

Intermission 

Overture-Fantasy — "Romeo and Juliet" - Peter I. Tschaikovjsky 
" Conducted by Louis Vyner 

Aria — "O du mein holder abendstern" from "Tannhauser" 

for Baritone and Orchestra - Richard Wagner 

"' Conrad Thibault 

Aria — "Einsam in Truben Tagen" from "Lohengrin" 

for Soprano and Orchestra - Richard Wagner 

t Mildred Cable 

Overture to "Rienzi" , . , , , Richard Wagner 

* Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
•* Student of Mr. Emil Mlynarski 
••* Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
t Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 

Bryn Mawr College wishes to express its gratitude to Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 
for her generosity in giving this concert 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofxiann, Director 
Preseyits 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 



Conducted b}/ 

SYLVAN LEVIN 
LOUIS VYNl 



assisted by 

JOSEPH LEVINE, Pianist 
ROSE BAMPTON, Contraleo 



The William Penn Auditorium 
Harrisburg 



Saturday Evening, May 9, 1931 

at 8:15 o''cloc\ 



The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, composed of 
ninety^eight students of The Curtis Institute of 
Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is augmented for 
this occasion hy two professionals, both of whom are 
faculty members of the Institute. 



Programme 



t? 



A London Symphony Vaughan Williams 

I. Lento — Allegro risoluto 
II. Lento 

III. Scherzo (Nocturne) : Allegro vivace 

IV. Andante con moto — Maestoso alia marcia — 
Allegro — Maestoso alia marcia — 
Epilogue: Andante sostenuto 

Conducted by Sylvan Levin 

Concerto in D minor for Piano and Orchestra AnTON RuBINSTEIN 

First Movement (Moderate assai) 

Joseph Levine 
Conducted by Sylvan Levin 



INTERMISSION 



Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche Richard Strauss 

Conducted by Louis Vyner 

Recitative and Aria — "Adieu, Forets" 

from "Jeanne d'Arc" PeTER I. TSCHAIKOWSKY 

for Contralto and Orchestra 

Rose Bampton, Contralto 
Conducted by Sylvan Levin 

Prelude to "Die Meistersinger" RiCHARD Wagner 

Conducted by Ward-Stephens 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



PERSONNEL OF STUDENT ORCHESTRA 
FOR HARRISBURG 



First Violins 
Philip Frank 
James Bloom 
Iso Briselli 
Jacob Brodsky 
Paul Gershman 
Gama Gilbert 
Celia Gomberg 
Laura Griffing 
Carmela Ippolito 
Robert Levine 
Lily Matison 
George Pepper 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Henry Siegl 
Ethel Stark 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Frances Wiener 

Second Violins 
Jack Pepper 
Abe Burg 
David Cohen 
Maurice Cramer 
Frank Gasparro 
Robert Gomberg 
Marian Head 
Charles JafFe 
Morris Marcus 
Raphael Silverman 
Felix Slatkin 
Nathan Snader 
Jean Spitzer 
Eva Stark 
Eva Young 

Violas 
Leon Frengut 
Simon Asin 
Gabriel Braverman 
Samuel Goldblum 
Arthur Granick 
Virginia Majewski 
Leonard Mogill 
Robert Warburton 
Garry White 



Violoncellos 

Frank Miller 
Grace Bazell 
Orlando Cole 
Samuel Geschichter 
Helen Gilbert 
Victor Gottlieb 
Josephine Herrick 
Howard Mitchell 
Bernard Olasov 
Brunetta Peterson 
Florence Williams 



Basses 

Oscar Zimmerman 
Frank Eney 
Emilio de Palma 
Jack Posell 
Carl Torello 
William Valentine 
Irven Whitenack 



Harjps 

William Cameron 
Victoria Bloom 
Alice Chalifoux 
Flora Bruce Greenwood 
Mary Griffith 



Flutes 

John Hreachmack 
Ardelle Hookins 
Emil Opava 
Kenton Terry 



Ohoes 

Isadore Goldblum 
Sidney Divinsky 
Robert Hester 



Clarinets 
James Collis 
Leon Lester 
Robert Hartman 
Felix Meyer 
Emil Schmachtenberg 

Bassoons 
William Santucci 
Andrew Luck 
Ferdinand Del Negro* 

Horns 
Theodore Seder 
Harry Berv 
Anton Horner* 
Sune Johnson 
Attillio de Palma 
Henry Whitehead 

TruTnf»ets 
John Schuler 
George Halbwachs 
John Harmaala 
Samuel Krauss 
Leopold Podder 

I'romhones 
Guy Boswell 
J. Warren Burkhart 
Gerald Woerner 

Tuba 
Ross Wyre 

Tympani 
Frank Schwarts 

Battery 
Lloyd C. Geisler 
Salvatore Perrone 
Frank Sinatra 



•Members of the Philadelphia Orchestra and faculty members of The Curtis Institute of Music 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Josef Hofmann, Director 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

Conducted, by 

SYLVAN LEVIN 
LOUIS VYNER 

assisted by 

PAUL GERSHMAN, Violinist 

JORGE BOLET, Pianist 
GENIA WILKOMIRSKA, Dramatic Soprano 

Followed by 



jor 
Soli, Chorus and Orchestra 

Conducted by 

DR. LOUIS BAILLY 



Saturday Evening, May 16, 1931 

at 8:20 o'cloc\ 



The Academy of Music 
Philadelphia 



The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, composed of 

ninety-six students of The Curtis Institute of 

Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



Programme 



r? 



Overture — "A Roman Carnival" Hector Berlioz 

Conducted by Sylvan Levin 

Concerto in E minor for Violin and Orchestra JULES CoNUS 

Paul Gershman 
Conducted by Louis Vyner 

Concerto in B flat minor for Piano and Orchestra . PeTER I. TsCHAIKOWSKY 

First movement (Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso) 

Jorge Bolet 

Conducted by Sylvan Levin 

Aria — "Suicidio" from "La Gioconda" AmiLCARE PoNCHIELLI 

for Soprano and Orchestra 

Genia Wilkomirska 
Conducted by Sylvan Levin 

Overture-Fantasy — "Romeo and Juliet" Peter I. Tschaikowsky 

Conducted by Louis Vyner 

INTERMISSION 



Requiem Gabriel Faur^ 

For Soli, Chorus, Organ and Orchestra 
Introit et Kyrie 
Offertoire 
Sanctus 
Pie Jesu 
Agnus Dei 
Libera me 
In Paradisum 
Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano Clarence Reinert, Baritone 

Robert Cato, at the Organ 
Conducted by Dr. Louis Bailly 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 

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PERSONNEL OF STUDENT ORCHESTRA 



First Violins 
Philip Frank 
James Bloom 
Iso Briselli 
Jacob Brodsky 
Gama Gilbert 
Celia Gomberg 
Laura Griffing 
Carmela Ippolito 
Robert Levine 
Lily Matison 
George Pepper 
Benjamin Sharlip 
Henry Sies;l 
Ethel Stark 
Ladislaus Steinhardt 
Frances Wiener 

Second Violins 
Jack Pepper 
Abe Burg 
David Cohen 
Maurice Cramer 
Frank Gasparro 
Robert Gomberg 
Marian Head 
Charles Jaffe 
Morris Marcus 
Raphael Silverman 
Felix Slatkin 
Nathan Snader 
Jean Spitzer 
Eva Stark 
Eva Young 

Violas 
Leon Frengut 
Max Aronoff 
Simon Asin 
Gabriel Braverman 
Samuel Goldblum 
Arthur Granick 
Virginia Majewski 
Leonard Mogill 
Robert Warburton 
Garry White 



Violoncellos 

Frank Miller 
Adine Barozsi 
Grace Bazell 
Orlando Cole 
Samuel Geschichter 
Helen Gilbert 
Victor Gottlieb 
Josephine Hcrrick 
Howard Mitchell 
Bernard Olasov 
Brunetta Peterson 
Florence V/illiams 

Basses 

Oscar Zimmerman 
Frank Ency 
Emilio de Palma 
Jack Posell 
Carl Torello 
WiUiam Valentine 
Irven Whitenack 

Harps 

William Cameron 
Victoria Bloom 
Flora Bruce Greenwood 
Ahce ChaUfoux 
Mary Griffith 

Flutes 

John Hreachmack 
Ardelle Hookins 
Emil Opava 
Kenton Terry 

Ohoes 

Isadore Goldblum 
Sidney Divinsky 
Robert Hester 



Clarinets 
James Collis 
Leon Lester 
Robert Hartman 
Emil Schmachtenberg 

Bassoons 
William Santucci 
Andrew Luck 

Horns 

Theodore Seder 
Harry Berv 
Sune Johnson 
Attillio de Palma 
Henry Whitehead 

Trumpets 
John Schuler 
George Halbwachs 
John Harmaala 
Samuel Krauss 
Leopold Podder 

Trombones 
Guy Boswell 
Warren Burkhart 
Gerald Woerner 

Tuba 
Ross Wyre 

Tympani 
Frank Schwartz 

Battery 

Lloyd C. Geisler 
Salvatore Perrone 
Frank Sinatra 



(5^. 



.c<^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 
1930-1931 



Third Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 



b^' Artist'Students 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 

First Concert 

Sunday Evening, TSjovember 9, 1930 
at 8:n o'cloc\ 



SWASTIKA QUARTET 

Gama Gilbert K.. ,. Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin Sharlip ) Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Assisted by 

Benjamin de Loache, Baritone James Collis, Clarinet 

Ardelle Hookins, Flute Leonard Mogill, Viola 

Jean-Marie Robinault, Piano 



The piano is a Steinway 
(5^3 ■ ^ 



.(Sy — ■ ^^ 



Programme 



t^» 



I. String Quartet in F major, Opus 96 Anton Dvorak 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Lento 

Molto vivace 

Finale — Vivace ma non troppo 

Swastika Quartet 

Anton Dvorak (1841-1904), a Bohemian by birth, was befriended in his 
youth by the composer Brahms, who recognized his rare talents, and an in' 
spiration as fresh, as varied and as spontaneous as Schubert's. At about 
thirty years of age Dvorak began his real life work as joint creator, with 
Bedfich Smetana his compatriot, of the modern and consciously nationalistic 
school of Czech music. Although the composer of a great number of works 
of various forms, Dvorak is undoubtedly best known for his chamber music 
compositions. To Americans he is familiar through three compositions which 
resulted from Dvorak's sojourn in New York during the years 1892489? as 
Director of the National Conservatory of Music. The works in question are 
the "New World Symphony," "American" String Quartet, and the Quintet 
in E flat (Opus 97). 

Of these the composer says . . ."I have simply written original themes 
embodying the peculiarities of Indian (and negro) music, and using these 
themes as subjects, have developed them with all the resources of modern 
rhythm, harmony, counterpoint, orchestral color." 

The "American" Quartet was written in three days during a summer 
vacation spent in a Czech agricultural colony in Iowa. It suggests the 
simplicity of rural life; the negroe's light-hearted merry making on the planta- 
tion, as well as the passionate longing and religious emotion of the slave. 
Especially in the second movement, a gem of musical expression, the composer 
succeeds in creating the atmosphere of the peaceful, perfumed night of the 
South with the passionate voice of some slave singing in the far distance. 
The last movement of the Quartet does not fully maintain the same atmos- 
phere as the preceding three but suggests rather a Bohemian village festival. 



<J^ -c<^ 



(^ '^ 



Programme 



II. String Quintet in B minor. Opus 115, JOHANNES BraHMS 

for Two Violins, Two Violas and 
Violoncello 
Allegro 
Adagio 

Andantino — Presto non assai, ma con sentimento 
Con moto 

Swastika Quartet and Mr. Mogill 

Johannes Brahms (born in Hamburg, 1833 — died in Vienna, 1897) spent 
the greater part of his life in Vienna. His original genius and his unswerving 
devotion to his own personal ideals set him apart from the older school of 
composers, of which Beethoven was the consummation, as well as from the 
"Romanticists," led by Schumann, the dramatic ideas of Wagner, and the 
sensational descriptive school of Berlioz, Liszt, and other contemporaries. 
During his whole life Brahms was a storm center of criticism and discussion, 
but today a fuller appreciation of the nobihty and majesty of his conceptions, 
and an understanding of his very original style have replaced the old hostiHty. 
Four great symphonies, many songs, choral works, chamber music in various 
forms, as well as numerous compositions for the pianoforte (for Brahms was 
in early life a professional pianist) are the fruit of incessant work during 
the 64 years of his life. 

Folksong was the inexhaustible spring from which he drew inspiration, 
developing and embellishing it with all the technical means of which he was a 
master, and colouring it with his own pecuUar personal style. 

The String Quintet, Opus 115, was originally written for clarinet and 
string quartet, but is seldom performed in that version. The musical material 
is developed by Brahms in the usual form, showing the influence of Bach and 
Beethoven, but with an individuality of expression so original, so vital, that 
the whole work is unHke anything else in Classical Music. Especially in the 
second movement the great current of the composer's genius breaks through 
the restrictions of conventions to rise to passionate heights of expression such 
as a great artist-improvisatore might reach in rare moments of exaltation. The 
finale, of variations in Mozartian style, is enriched by all the arts of modern 
polyphony, terminating in a subdued note of melancholy; the reflex of the 
emotional excitement of the preceding movements. 



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Programme 



III. Rapsodie Negre Francis Poulenc 

for Voice, Piano, Flute, Clarinet, 
and String Quartet (1917) 

I. Prelude 

II. Rondo 

III. Honolulu 

IV. Pastorale 

V. Final 

Mr. de Loache, Mr. Robinault, Miss Hookins, 
Mr. Collis and Swastika Quartet 

Francis Poulenc (born in 1899) a modern French composer was the fourth 
to join the famous club called "The Six" founded in 1917 in Paris by a 
group of young musicians in revolt against the domination of the sO'Called 
"Impressionists" in French music. At the club's first concert in 1918, the 
"Rapsodie Negre" attracted instant attention as the work of a young man 
of nineteen years and of independent ideas. The style, similar to others 
from Poulenc's hand, exhibits a determination to avoid compHcated harmonic 
effects, to develop his themes independently of each other, dissonant or not, 
and a keen instinct for tonal values of instruments employed. The "Rapsodie" 
which appears to be an attempt to reproduce the native atmosphere of the 
South Sea islands and particularly of Hawaii, is written in live short episodes, 
which may be characterized as follows: — 

1. A slow march for a religious ceremony of solemnity and sadness. 

2. A dance of savage rhythm, agitated and sensuous, developing into 
a frenzy which ends in complete exhaustion. 

3. Vocal interlude, "Honolulu," to words by a native; a strange dirge 
of primitive character with orchestration in ukulele effect. 

4. A melody of great beauty, languorous and of flowing simpHcity of 
line. 

?. A savage invocation to patriotic fervour; a strident war invocation. 



The next concert will be given on December 14, 1930 



d^ r<^ 



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c^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

1930-1931 



Third Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 



b}' Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Mv^c 



Second Concert 
Sunday Evening, December 14, 1930 

at 8: 1 5" o'cloc\ 



The piano is a Steinway 

c5^ ^ 



(5^- 



Programme 



*^ 



I. Quartet in E major, Opus 20, for Piano, SeRGIUS TaNEIEV 

Violin, Viola and Violoncello 

Allegro brillante 
Adagio piij tosto largo 
Finale: Allegro molto 

Jennie Robinor, Piano Samuel Goldblum, Viola 

Jacob Brodsky, Violin Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 

Sergius Ivanovitch Taneiev (1856-1915) was a pupil of Tschaikowsky 
at the Conservatory of Moscow where he himself later became Professor and 
Director. Taneiev is especially famous for his absolute mastery of the com- 
phcated subject of counterpoint and of the theory and development of 
musical form, on both of which subjects he wrote authoritatively. 

The Piano Quartet, Opus 20, of all his compositions alone would serve 
to place Taneiev in the highest class in respect to the richness, versatility and 
effectiveness of polyphony in this combination of instruments. In fact it may 
be ranked as a masterpiece not only of Taneiev himself, but of all composi- 
tions of its kind. The choice of themes is very romantic and original and 
strangely enough decidedly not Russian. The intense study and exhaustive 
exercises to which the composer was accustomed to submit all his thematic 
material before he decided upon the final forms of harmonic and polyphonic 
development used in his published works, have nowhere borne riper fruit 
than in the climax which he has been able to build up in this quartet. For 
richness of effect it stands alone among the works of the Masters. 



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Programme 



II. "The Song of Solomon" Variations for Hermann Zilcher 

Contralto and Baritone, Piano and 
String Quartet 

Ruth Gordon, Contralto Conrad Thibault, Baritone 

Jennie Robinor, Piano 
Jacob Brodsky J... .. Samuel Goldblum, Viola 

Paul Gershman ) '° '" Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 

Hermann Zilcher (born in 1881) Director of the Conservatory at WurtZ' 
burg, has not published much, but his work shows a masterly technique. A 
Quintet for piano and strings, other smaller chamber music forms, and two 
series of songs with string accompaniments show decidedly original music 
style and thought. 

The Song of Solomon in musical structure is very clear and simple. It 
belongs to that school in which the old masters developed the art of bel 
canto, choosing to let the voice be paramount; to carry the main line of their 
thought while the instruments provided a background, sympathetic and at 
times pictorial, but never complicated and polyphonic as later became the 
style. With such a musical form, and a composer of the sensitiveness and 
the balance of Zilcher, with his resources at the service of his inner emotion, 
the natural result is a structure of noble simplicity comparable to the Greek 
temple. Although the subject of the Song of Solomon is both exotic and 
erotic the composer has attempted no oriental coloring, and has followed the 
line of passion expressed in the text, with so simple, natural an atmosphere as 
to clothe the poem with emotional grace and beauty. 

The text is a free adaptation and selection of passages from the BiUical 
"Song of Solomon" done into German by one Will Vesper. It consists of a 
series of love passages between the glorious King "crowned with many 
crowns," and his beloved "of priceless beauty, set far above all other women." 
The final consummation of their love is expressed by the strings alone in an 
impassioned interlude, after which the King closes with an epistrophic passage 

"I have eaten and I am satisfied 
Of sweet honey have I had my fill 
I have drunken of my wine 
And my heart is warmed therewith. 
For my beloved have I builded a dwelling 
And therein would I rest. 
I have strewn it with sweet balsam 
With the immortal amaranth have I strewn it 
And all therein, rejoices me." 



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Programme 



III. Octet in E flat major, Opus 20, for Four . . .FeLIX MeNDELSSOHN 
Violins, Two Violas, Two Violoncelli 

Allegro modcrato, ma con fuoco 

Andante 

Scherzo — Allegro leggierissimo 



Presto 

Paul Gershman \ Max Aronoff 

Gama Gilbert I,,., Leon Frengut 

T T, / Violins 

James Bloom j Orlando Cole 

Benjamin Sharlip j Frank Miller 



[ Violas 

[ Violoncelli 



Felix Mendelssohn'Bartholdy (1809-1847) as a youth of sixteen startled 
and amazed the musical world with the composition of the Octet for strings 
and shortly after, music for Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream" for 
which the Scherzo of the Octet seems to have been a sort of preliminary 
study. In these works are already evident, developed in full, the character' 
istics of Mendelssohn's style as displayed in very numerous subsequent works 
— facility of writing, fertility of musical ideas and a certain melodious fluency 
which at times may prove tiresome. The Octet, however, retains its fresh' 
ness, delicacy and charm, nor is the melody obscured by the free use of 
ornament. The gem of the composition is the "Scherzo" which was afterward 
orchestrated by the composer. It is said that a passage in Goethe's "Wal' 
purgis Nacht" (Faust) suggested the idea of this work to the youthful 
Mendelssohn. 



The next concert will he given on February 1, J 93 1 
(5^ r<^ 



-cS^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 
1930-1931 



Third Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 



b>' Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
Head of the Department of Chamber Music 



Third Concert 



Sunday Evening, Fehruary 1, 1931 

at 8:1 S o'cloc\ 



SWASTIKA QUARTET 
) Max Aro; 

Benjamin Sharlip j Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



Gama Gilbert "j... ,. Max Aronoff, Viola 

> Vxohns 



Assisted by 
Joseph Levine, Piano 
Robert Bloom, Oboe Theodore Seder, Horn 

James Collis, Clarinet William Santucci, Bassoon 



The piano is a Steinway 



C^ 



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^rogramme 



I. String Quartet in E mmor, Ludwig van Beethoven 

Opus 59, No. 2 

Allegro 

Molto adagio (Si tratta questo pezzo con molto di sentimento) 

Allegretto 

Finale-Presto 

Swastika Quartet 

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) ranks among the immortal geniuses 
in musical composition. The greater part of his life was passed in Vienna 
where he was the admired favorite of the aristocratic musical circles. Erratic 
in his conduct, ungovernable in temper, almost totally deaf in the latter part 
of his life, he surrendered himself more and more to the contemplation of his 
inner Hfe and of nature and its expression in his music. Nine great sym- 
phonies, an opera ("Fidelio"), songs, pianoforte sonatas, trios and sixteen 
quartets are superb examples of his astounding creative powers. The quartets 
(1800-1826) may be considered as belonging to three periods of Beethoven's 
development. Of these, the first period is characterized by a close following 
of the acknowledged laws of quartet composition and the models of classical 
style such as the works of Mozart and Haydn. The second period is that in 
which, as a mature man, conscious of his own power, he dares to express his 
own individuality, with increasing freedom from arbitrary rules, while in the 
third he transcends all rigid bonds of musical form, and attempts to express 
his intellectual and philosophical life and convictions through great originality 
in themes and an untrammeled inspiration in developing them in musical form. 

Beethoven's Quartet, Opus 59, Number 2, is the second of a group of 
three quartets dedicated to a Russian noble, patron of music in Vienna, by 
name Count Rasoumowsky, and was composed not later than February, 1807. 
It thus belongs to the second period of the composer's style, called his period 
of self exteriorisation, in which, with genius matured and technique assured, 
he abruptly drops his adherence to musical convention and ceases his follow- 
ing of the ideas and styles of his predecessors. Thirty great chamber music 
works of this period reveal the composer's new ideas of musical form, his 
joys and griefs, and in short, his own fully developed personality. The Quar- 
tet in E minor is remarkable especially for the superb second movement in 
which the composer's mood passes from the heights of a serene calm through 
an heroic, martial phase, to one of restless unassuagable grief and finally to 
a resigned acceptance of inevitable fate. The third movement illustrates one 
of Beethoven's great innovations in form — namely the fully developed Scherzo. 
In this movement he introduces, in honor of his patron, a Russian melody, 
written as if for men's and women's choruses. It is the same theme that Mous- 
sorgsky much later used for the great chorus in the first act of his opera 
"Boris Godounov". 



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Programme 

II. String Quartet in G minor. Opus 10 Claude Debussy 

Anime et tres decide 
Assez vif et bien rj-thme 
Andantino doucement expressif 
Tres modere — Tres mouvemente 

Swastika Quartet 

Claude Achille Debussy (1862-1918) French composer, has exerted a 
profound influence upon music, not only in France, but internationally, as 
the founder of modern musical "impressionism", parallel to the school of 
impressionism in painting. 

Up to the age of ten Debussy exhibited no especial musical gifts. It was 
the mother-in'law of Verlaine, the poet, whose verses Debussy later so beau- 
tifully set to music, who discovered and encouraged the boy's talents. After 
eleven years of thorough practical and theoretical training at the Paris Con- 
servatory and a sojourn in Rome as the holder of the Grand Prix de Rome, 
the highest honor of the Conservatory, Debussy began his career as a com- 
poser. This career lasted for about twenty years during which he revolu- 
tionized artistic ideas of musicians and converted the general public to an 
appreciation of "impressionism", and a comprehension of the expression "at- 
mosphere" as applied to music. A new and more subtle technique of playing, 
a spiritual rather than a material approach to music, suggestion of mood, of 
reaction, rather than definite expression, are Debussy's gift to the musical 
thought of the world. 

Piano pieces, rarely beautiful songs, orchestral compositions such as "La 
Mer", "L'Apres-midi d'un faune". "La Cathedrale engloutie" and, above all, 
the epoch making opera "Pelleas and Melisande" written to a text by Maeter- 
linck, the Belgian poet, are now familiar to most music lovers, although at 
their first hearing they were regarded by the general public as vague and 
mystifying. UnUke most great composers, Debussy's style never expanded or 
changed to any appreciable extent. His idiom was his and his alone, and 
6prang full fledged into being after his eleven years of training, nor does 
his style show evidence of any especial outside influence, except from the 
Russian and early French writers. 

The Quartet in G minor was produced after the return from Rome. It 
was written for the Societe Nationale des Compositeurs of France, was dedi- 
cated to the great Belgian violinist Ysaye and played first by him and his 
quartet. The composer attended the rehearsals which were most difficult 
owing to the score being still in manuscript, the entirely new type of musical 
ideas and the fact that Debussy constantly changed the score as he perceived 
faults, or wished to produce different or better effects. At the first hearing 
the third movement made the most profound impression with its totally novel 
emotional and spiritual appeal: — here was "atmosphere". The Quartet, 
when carefully analyzed, will be found to contain in itself practically all that 
Debussy ever had to say, so full is it of new ideas expressed with such an 
economy of material and with such a solidity of technic. The movement in 
which the viola part is scored against the combined pizzicatti of the three 
other instruments is most daring and beautiful. In it Debussy has carried to 
its perfect development the innovation of Beethoven in his "Harfen" quartet. 



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Programme 

III. Quintet in E flat major for WOLFGANG AmaDEUS MoZ.VRT 

Piano, Oboe, Clarinet. Horn and Bassoon. Kochel No. 4?2 

Largo — Allegretto moderato 

Larghetto 

Rondo — Allegretto 

Joseph Levine, Piano 
Robert Bloom, Oboe Theodore Seder, Horn 

James Collis, Clarinet William Santucci. Bassoon 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (born in Salzburg, 1756 — died in Vienna, 
1791) was one of the most instinctive musical geniuses of all time. His pre' 
cocity was phenomenal, so that at five he was playing in public and compos' 
ing, progressing so rapidly that at ten he was able to play at sight almost 
anything then written for clavier or violin and already composing for chorus 
and orchestra. Throughout his life in demand as a pianist and receiving 
admiration and applause for his compositions, he was, nevertheless, often in 
straitened circumstances. He died at the age of 35, involved in a tangle of 
.sordid cares, and was buried in a common grave of the city's paupers in 
Vienna. 

In spite of the brevity of his life, his achievements were colossal and his 
genius was the consummate flower of the classical period. He was one of the 
most accompHshed keyboard performers of the time and was equally expert 
upon the violin and the viola (for which he had a special liking). His 600 
works, represent all forms of composition: operas, oratorios, cantatas, church 
music, orchestral works (including 49 symphonies and 25 concertos) chamber 
music (including 9 string quintets, 26 string quartets, 7 piano trios, 42 violin 
sonatas), and keyboard works (piano sonatas, organ sonatas, et cetera). 

The E flat major Quintet for piano and woodwind instruments belongs 
to the great piano concerto period of Mozart's life and was finished in Vienna 
in 1784. The composer always valued it highly, as did the public, for several 
arrangements of it were made for other combinations of instruments, though 
none by the master himself. Mozart's genius manifests itself in the astonish- 
ing way in which he manipulates the two masses of tone — on the one side the 
piano, on the other the woodwinds, and in the way in which by utilizing the 
different qualities of tone, or "timbre", of the woodwinds, he manages to 
create an effect within effect in their share in the composition; he even goes 
so far as to modify his themes to suit the peculiar qualities of the individual 
instruments. While certain portions of the composition show Italian influ- 
ence and the last movement is French in character, the whole work is the 
supreme expression of gaiety and joyousness. There are no involved ideas, no 
tragic passages, no problems presented. Beethoven's admiration for this work 
influenced him, thirteen years later, to use this same combination of instru' 
ments for his own Quintet Opus 16. 



The next concert will he given on 'March 8, 1931 



d^ c^ 



(5^ c^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

1930-1931 



Third Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 



b}/ Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts are under the artistic direction of 

Dr. Louis Bailly, Head of the Department 

of Chamber Music 



Fourth Concert 



Sunday Evening, March 8, 1931 

at 8:15 o'cloc\ 



The piano is a Steinwat 



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Programme 



«^> 



I. Sextet for Strings, Opus 70 Peter I. TscHAiKOWSKY 

(Souvenir dc Florence) 

Allegro con spirito 
Adagio cantabile e con moto 
Allegretto moderato 
Allegro vivace 

Jacob Brodsky [... ,. Leon Frengut iw i 

T , , f Violins o r> y violas 

Lily Matison S Samuel Goldblum \ 

Adine Barozzi )-,,.■, „. 

T, ,-, ^ Violoncelh 

Katherine Conant \ 

Peter Ilytch Tschaikowsky (1840-1893). 

The Conservatory of St. Petersburg under the direction of Anton Rubin- 
stein was the first strong influence in the musical life of Tschaikowsky who 
was to become a representative Russian composer of international renown. 

Six famous symphonies, an opera "Eugen Onegin", Suites, such as "Casse 
Noisette" and "Pique Dame", two quartets and numerous other pieces are 
familiar to most music lovers. In one of his letters Tschaikowsky says "You 
ask me how I manage my instrumentation. ... I invent the musical idea 
and the instrumentation simultaneously . . . As regards the Russian element 
in my works, I may tell you that not infrequently I begin a composition with 
the intention of introducing some folk melody. ... As to this national ele- 
ment in my work ... it proceeds from . . . having from my earliest years 
been impregnated with the characteristic beauty of our Russian folk songs. 
... In a word I am Russian in the fullest sense of the word". 

Nothing could more fully exemplify the truth of these words than the 
string sextet "Souvenir de Florence" which was written in 1890 soon after 
the composer's return from a sojourn in Italy and only three years before his 
death. The work is amusing as a souvenir, not of an Italian Florence, but 
of a Florence seen through an utterly Russian atmosphere — so much so that 
the third movement is Russian folk song and dance, pure and simple. 

The first movement, in which the composer apparently starts out with 
a fixed determination to be as Italian as possible, though with a Russian 
rhythm at that, seems to represent the Carnival spirit, a joyous restless spirit 
of the populace above whose turmoil rises a clear lyric voice given out by the 
first violin. The second movement might almost be an Italian operatic scene 
in miniature — a lover's serenade, a beautiful theme, the whispering of unseen 
passers'by, a return of the song and the final subsidence of all in the quiet 
of a summer's night. 

The work bears all the earmarks of the composer's style except one, 
that of melancholy (so characteristic of the Russian temperament and music 
and especially of Tschaikowsky) for we find in this composition only gaiety. 
The elaborated themal development to the familiar Tschaikowsky climax, the 
melodic line and the keen sense of rhythm that mark the work of this master 
are everywhere in evidence. 



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Programme 

11. Vier Ernste Gesange, Opus 121, for Male Voice, Johannes Brahms 

and Piano 

1. Ecclesiastes, Chapter 3 

2. Ecclesiastes, Chapter 4 

3. Ecclesiastes, Chapter 41 

4. St. Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians, Chapter 13 

Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano 

Johannes Brahms (1833'1897) spent the greater part of his life in 
Vienna. His original genius and his unswerving devotion to his own per- 
sonal ideals set him apart from the older school of composers, of which 
Beethoven was the consummation, as well as from the "Romanticists", led by 
Schumann, the dramatic ideas of Wagner, and the sensational descriptive 
school of Berlioz, Lis2t, and other contemporaries. During his whole life 
Brahms was a storm center of criticism and discussion, but today a fuller 
appreciation of the nobility and majesty of his conceptions, and an under' 
standing of his very original style have replaced the old hostility. Four great 
symphonies, many songs, choral works, chamber music in various forms, as 
well as numerous compositions for the pianoforte (for Brahms was in early 
life a professional pianist) are the fruit of incessant work during 64 years of 
his life. 

The "Four Serious Songs" were among the last compositions of Johannes 
Brahms when, victim of serious and increasing illness and depressed by the 
death of his dearest friends, he considered his own impending end, and in a 
magnificent expression of a soul's agony crystalized in musical form his 
philosophy and faith. 

Selecting texts from the Ecclesiastes and from St. Paul as expressing his 
own emotions, he passes in the first song from a pessimistic declaration that 
all is vanity, that death comes to man and beast alike, to the frankly material- 
istic idea that the present alone is real; and therefore to be enjoyed so far as 
possible. 

The second song follows with a lament for the evil and suffering upon 
the earth and the conclusion that only the dead are happy. 

The third mood is one of direct contemplation of Death. "How bitter 
art thou", he cries, "to one who dwells in peace, joy and prosperity, and yet 
how welcome to him who is in distress, comfortless, and in hopeless suffering!" 

In the fourth song he declares "There is but one conclusion to the whole 
matter — Love alone profiteth a man: not power nor knowledge, generosity or 
sacrifice. I see but darkly now, but in death these mysteries shall be made 
plain. Faith, hope and love — these are the abiding verities, but of these the 
greatest is love." 



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Programme 



v5^ 

III. Octet in F major. Opus 166, FraNZ ScHUBERT 

for Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, Two Violins, Viola, 
Violoncello and Double Bass 

Adagio — Allegro 
Andante un poco mosso 
Scherzo — Allegro vivace 
Andante con variazioni 
Menuetto — Allegretto 
Andante molto — Allegro 

James Collis, Clarinet William Santucci, Bassoon 

Theodore Seder, Horn 
Paul Gershman / ... ,. Leon Frengut, Viola 

Lily Matison S Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 

Jack Posell, Double Bass 

Franz Peter Schubert (1797'1828) was the only one of the great com- 
posers, native to Vienna. Called by Liszt "the most poetic of all musicians", 
he was also the most prolific. At the age when Beethoven had composed one 
symphony, Schubert already had written ten, besides numerous other works. 
He essayed practically all forms of composition, but his songs, of which there 
are 603, chamber music, and symphonies are of unusual beauty. Gaiety, 
charm, melody, and at times the deepest tragedy characterize his works. 

Schubert's Octet was written for a Count Trayer, a Viennese amateur 
clarinet player, in February 1824 at a time when the composer found himself 
at almost the lowest ebb of fortune, health and spirits in a life filled with 
suffering and disappointment — a time when he wrote "My musical works are 
the product of my genius and of my misery, and what the public most relishes 
is that which has given me the greatest distress." 

The work may be considered as a little symphony, its six movements 
apparently serving as preliminary work for a grand symphony which appeared 
eighteen months later. The use of the wind instruments is unusual in 
Schubert's chamber music works and the predominance of the clarinet in the 
second movement was doubtless for the Count as a player of that instrument. 
The fourth movement may be considered the most interesting and richest as 
to imaginative power. It consists of a series of seven variations giving each 
instrument, even the contrabass, an opportunity for display of its peculiar 
qualities and the skill of the individual performers. 



The next concert will he given on April 19, 1931 



(5^ ^f<^ 



d^- 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19304931 



Third Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 



By Artist-Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 



These Concerts are under the artistic direaion oj 

Dr. Louis Bailly, Head of the Department 

of Chamber Mvisic 



Chorus of 40 Students from the Vocal Department 

Orchestr.'^ of 64 Members from the 

Curtis Symphony Orchestr.\ 



Fifth and Last Concert 
Sunday Evening, April 19, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Organ is an Estey Minuette 
(^ ^ 



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Programme 



Sixth Brandenburg Concerto, in B flat major. JoHANN Sebastian Bach 

(Organ obligate by F. A. Gevaert) 
For Violas with accompaniment of Violoncelli and Double Basses 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio ma non tanto 
Allegro 

Leon Frengut, Viola Solo Max Aronoff, Viola Solo 

Robert Cato, at the Organ 
Conducted by Louis Vyner 

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was the culminating flower of a 
family unique in history for a long line of members extraordinarily gifted 
musically. His long arduous life coincided with a period of profound religious 
feeling in Germany following Luther and the religious revolution which 
deeply affected his work. As an organist, composer, and reformer through- 
out his tremendously active life, Bach produced masterpiece after masterpiece 
with inexhaustible fertility of ideas. He also revolutionized the technique 
of piano playing through his entirely new method of employing the thumbs 
as well as the fingers in playing. It was as organist of the famous St. Thomas 
Church in Leipzig that he completed his marvelous works, the "Passions" of 
St. Matthew and of St. John which never have been equalled in majestic 
power. A student of his work has said "Bach produced the finest suites, the 
finest organ music, the finest church cantatas, the finest solo violin music, the 
finest chorale motets, the finest chorale preludes and the finest passions." 

The Brandenburg Concerti were written shortly previous to 1721, to the 
order of a young musical enthusiast of Berlin, the Margraf of Brandenburg, 
for the use of his private corps of players. Bach called them "Concerti 
Grossi" and all follow the conventional arrangement of three movements. The 
Sixth of the series is unique in employing two violas for its leading voices. 

The first movement develops two subjects for solo and tutti respectively, 
in character somewhat mysterious in Bach's masterly treatment. The second 
movement has a lovely melody for the two violas carried out in fugal form. 
The last movement, demanding the utmost from expert viola players, develops 
more and more powerfully and elaborately to a thrilling finale. The general 
character of this work is that of the Italian gigue. 

The six concerti stand in a class by themselves above all others in music. 



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Programme 
Canzonetta, Opus 62a, Jean Sibelius 

for String Orchestra 

Conducted by Louis Vyner 

Jean Sibelius (born in 1865) is a preeminent composer of the Nordic 
lands, especially of Finland, his native country. Although SibeHus has studied 
much and travelled abroad, he seems never to have been deeply affected by 
influences exterior to himself and his native environment. A grant from the 
Finnish government has permitted him to devote all his time to his composi' 
tions which are numerous and important. Their themes are often drawn 
from the epic poem of Finland, the "Kalevala" and they breathe an intense 
love of his country, its history, its indomitable people, its nature. Strangely 
enough Sibelius is also prone to subjects of Hellenic inspiration. The best 
known of his works are undoubtedly the tone poem, "Finlandia" and the 
orchestral composition "The Swan of Tuonela." 



Requiem Gabriel Faure 

For Soli, Chorus, Organ and Orchestra 

Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano Conrad Thibault, "^a-nxone. 

Robert Cato, at the Organ 

Conducted by Dr. Louis Bailly 

Gabriel Faure (1845'1924) preeminent as an organist, composer and 
Director of the Paris Conser\'atory, has exerted a great influence upon modern 
French music through his own writing and his numerous distinguished pupils 
who are outstanding figures in French music of today. His was an exceptional 
gift in respect to writing for the voice whether solo or in chorus, especially 
when supported by orchestra, and no one has surpassed him in the building 
up of great emotional and dramatic cHmaxes. His works, which are numerous, 
comprise many beautiful songs, especially a collection entitled "La Bonne 
Chanson"; an opera "Penelope" produced with success at the Opera Comique 
in Paris; two extraordinarily fine piano quartets, masterpieces for the combina' 
tion of strings and piano; a well-known violin sonata; two string quintets and 
a noteworthy orchestral work "Pelleas et Melisande." 

The "Requiem" which was produced in 1888 when Faure was at the 
height of his powers and was organist at the Madeleine in Paris, follows, 
naturally, the ritual of the Roman Catholic Church for the Repose of the 
Souls of the Dead. Its divisions are: 

1. Introit et Kyrie 4. Pie Jesu 

2. Offertoire 5. Agnus Dei 

3. Sanctus 6. Libera me 

7. In Paradisum 

The most dramatic effects are evident in the "Libera me in die ilia trc 
menda" and in the sublime calm of the angel's voice in "In Paradisum." 

This work has, so far as is known, never before been heard in America 
in concert form. 



(5^ c<^ 



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Introit et Kyrie 

Rest eternal, grant unto them, O Lord, and 

may light perpetual shine upon them. 
A hymn, O God, becometh Thee in Sion 

and unto Thee shall be paid a vow in 

Jerusalem. 
Hear my prayer; unto Thee shall all flesh 

come 
Lord have mercy. 
Christ have mercy. 



Offertoire 

Lord, Jesus Christ, King of Glory, 

Deliver the souls of the departed 

From the punishment of hell and from the 

deep pit. 
O Lord Jesus Christ, King of Glory, 
Deliver the souls of the departed 
From the mouth of the lion 
Lest Hell swallow them up and they fall 

into darkness. 
Sacrifices and prayers unto Thee, O Lord, 

we offer. 
Do Thou receive them on behalf of those 

souls whom we this day commemorate. 
Grant them, O Lord, to pass from death 

to life 
Which Thou didst promise of old to 

Abraham and his seed. 



Sanctus 

Holy Lord God of Sabbath 

Heaven and earth are full of Thy glory 

Hosannah in the highest. 



Pie Jesu 

Holy Lord Jesus, grant to them rest 
eternal. 



Agnus Dei 

Lamb of God who takest away the sins of 

the world 
Grant them rest eternal and may light 

eternal shine upon them with Thy saints 

forever. 

Because Thou art merciful. 



Libera me 

Deliver me, O Lord, from death eternal in 

that fearful day 
When the heavens and earth shall be 

shaken 
When Thou comest to judge the world 

with fire. 
Trembling has seized me; I fear the judg' 

ment and the wrath that is to come. 
That day of wrath, calamity and sorrow, 

that great day exceeding bitter. ' 



In Paradisum 

Into Paradise may the Angels lead Thee. 
At Thy coming may the Martyrs re- 
ceive Thee and bring Thee into the 
holy city Jerusalem. 

May the choir of angels welcome Thee 
and with Lasarus, who once was poor, 
mayest Thou have eternal rest. 



d^- 



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NoRRisTowN Octave Club 
Y. W. C. A. Hall 

NoRRiSTOWN, Pennsylvania 
Wednesday Afternoon, October IS, 1930, at 2:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Ladislaus Steinhardt, Violinist 

**C0NRAD Thibault, Baritone 

***JosEPH RuBANOFF, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. First Movement from Concerto in D major Johannes Brahms 

(Cadensa by Joachim) 
Mr. Steinhardt 

II. "Where 'er You Walk" from "Semele" George Frederic Handel 

Passing By Edward Purcell 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Mr. Thibault 



1 



III. Soupir , ^^ ^ 

^, r- . }■ Henri Duparc 

Lihanson i riste 

D'une Prison Reynaldo Hahn 

"Chanson du Toreador" from "Carmen" Georges Bizet 

Mr. Thibault 

IV. Preludium in E major Johann Sebastian Bach 

Nocturne in D major ChopiN'Wilhelmj 

Souvenir de Moscou Henri Wieniawski 

Mr. Steinhardt 

V. Thy Beaming Eyes Edward MacDowell 

So Perverse Frank Bridge 

The Shepherdess Edward Horsman 

A Piper Michael Head 

Mr. Thibault 



*Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

g ill" II III I II II iiiiiMiiii Ill iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin nil III i ii i i i ii i i i iii i i i iiiiiiiiiiiii i ii i ii i iii i i iii iii ii i i i mm i ii i j 



Western Maryland College 

Westminster, Maryland 
Friday Evening, T^ovemher 14, 1930, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*WiLLiAM Harms, Pianist 

**Arthur Holmgren, Bass-Baritone 

***Cell\ Gomberg, Violinist 

fEuGENE Helmer, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Chaconne Bach-Busoni 

Mr. Harms 

II. Lungi dal caro bene Antonio Secchi 

Non piu d'amore Andrea Falconieri 

Blick'ich umher from "Tannhauser" Richard Wagner 

Roslein dreie Johannes Brahms 

Mr. Holmgren 

III. Romance from Concerto in D minor Henri Wieniawski 

La Gitana Fritz Kreisler 

Impromptu ToR AuLiN 

Miss Gomberg 

IV. Prelude in A minor Claude Debussy 

Flirtation in a Chinese Garden ) . ^ 

Rush Hour in Hong Kong \ ^^^'^^ Chasins 

Naila Waltz Delibes-DohnAnyi 

Mr. Harms 

V. Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes Old English 

Passing By Edward Purcell 

When the King Went Forth to War Thomas Koeneman 

TallyHo! Franco Leoni 

Mr. Holmgren 

VI. Praeludium und Allegro PugnanI'Kreisler 

Tango AlbeniZ'Kreisler 

Scherzo'Tarantelle Henri Wieniawski 

Miss Gomberg 

*Student of Mr. Josef Hopmann 

**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 

***Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

a i m illllllli n illlll l lli r i l l l Ml ll M lllllllli n illli n illlllllllll M i n illll ll ll l ililll l lllilllli n il l llll l l ll l lliiiHinniiiiiiniiiiiiiinillinniiinin i nn ii nM i n iiiii in i n iilirTTnT^^ 



g l ll l l l llll l llll l llll l l l l lll l l lllll l lllll l llll l lll ll ll l l ll ll ll lll ll ll ll l l lll llll llll l ll l lll ll llll l ll l ll llll l l l ll lll l llll iii iiiiiinMiiiinii I niiiiiiiiiiiiiir iii lll l llll ll ll l l ll iniin j 

State Teachers' College 

West Chester, Pennsylvania 
Tuesday Evening, T^ovemher 18, 1930, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

* Joseph Levin e, Pianist 

**Edna Corday, Soprano 

***Paul Gershman, Violinist 

fYvONNE Krinsky, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Chaconne Bach-Busoni 

Chorus of the Whirling Dervishes Beethoven-SainT'Saens 

Mr. Levine 

II. Quando miro quel bel CigHo Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

"In quelle trine morbide" from "Manon Lescaut" Giacomo Puccini 

Spirate Pur, Spirate Stefano Donaudy 

Miss Corday 

III. Andante and Rondo from "Symphonic Espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Mr. Gershman 

IV. Premiere Valse oubliee Franz Liszt 

Danse Macabre SainT'Saens-Liszt 

Mr. Levine 

V. Deep in love was I Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Lithuanian Song Frederic Chopin 

Life and Death Coleridge Taylor 

Miss Corday 

VI. Melodic GlucK'Kreisler 

Slavonic dance in G minor Dvorak-Kreisler 

Air on G String BacH'Wilhelm j 

Introduction et Tarantelle, Opus 43 Pablo de Sarasate 

Mr. Gershman 



•Student of Mr. Josep Hopmann 

**Studcnt in Operatic Acting 

•**Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Wednesday Club 

Fahnestock Hall 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

"Wednesday Afternoon, J^ovemher 19, 1930, at 2:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*JORGE BoLET, Pianist 

**Agnes Davis, Soprano 

***JuDiTH PoSKA, Violinist 

fTHEODORE Saidenberg, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Prelude, Choral and Fugue Cesar Franck 

Mr. Bolet 

II. Ritorna Vincitor! from "Aida" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Davis 

III. Introduction et Rondo Capriccioso, Opus 28 Camille SainT'Saens 

Miss Poska 



I 



IV. Cubana , ,, _ 

. , , } Manuel de Falla 

Andaluza 

Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube Waltz. .StrausS'SchulZ'Evler 

Mr. Bolet 

V. Verborgenheit Hugo Wolf 

Zueignung Richard Strauss 

Dreams Abram Chasins 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Miss Davis 

VI. Grand Adagio from the Ballet "Raymonda" . . . ) ^ _ 

„,,,,„„,,„ 1 " r Glazounov'Zimbalist 

v/altz irom the Ballet Raymonda ) 

La Capricciosa Franz Ries 

Hungarian Melodies, Opus 22 Heinrich Ernst 

Miss Poska 



*Student of Mr. David Saperton 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 

tGraduate Student of Mr. Harry Kaupman in Accompanying 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



j n ii im i n i Ill Mi ll iiii m llll U I I IIIIIIII I IIIII| i||IH I |ii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii ii i i i i iiiiiiiii m ii n iiii m i i i M i niiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii g 

University of Delaware 

Mitchell Hall 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices: Newark Music Society 

Thursday Evening, T^ovemher 20, 1930, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*RoBERT Cato, Organist 

**MiLDRED Cable, Soprano 

***Iso Briselli, Violinist 

tJosEPH RuBANOFF, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Prelude and Fugue in A minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Concerto No. 5 in F major George Frederic Handel 

Larghetto' Allegro 
Alia Siciliana'Presto 
Mr. Cato 

II. Von ewiger Liebe Johannes Brahms 

Hat dich die Liebe beriihrt Joseph Marx 

Wer hat dies Liedlein erdacht? Gustav Mahler 

Miss Cable 

III. First movement from the concerto in A major 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
Allegro aperto-Adagio-Allegro aperto 
Mr. Briselli 

IV. Intermezzo from the First Symphony Charles-Marie Widor 

Chorale Prelude, "A Rose breaks into Bloom" Johannes Brahms 

Two Versets on the Magnificat Marcel Dupre 

"He remembering His mercy" 
"Gloria" Mr. Cato 

V. Spirate Pur, Spirate Stefano Donaudy 

Ah! quanto e vero from "II Porao d'Oro" Marcantonio Cesti 

Ernani involami from "Ernani" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Cable 

VI. Air de Lensky TsCHAiKOWSKY-AuER 

Ballet Music from "Rosamunde" Schubert-Kreisler 

Playera Pablo de Sarasate 

Praeludium Christian Sinding 

Mr. BriselH 

*Student of Mr. Lynwood Farnam 
**Student of Madame M.^rcella Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Eprem Zimbalist 

jStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The STEiNW.\y is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



MooRESTOwN Woman's Club 

TRINITY CHURCH 

MooRESTOWN, New Jersey 

Monday Afternoon, December 1, 1930 at 3 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

♦George Pepper, Violinist 

**Ardelle Hookins, Flutist 

***Lawrence Apgar, Organist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Prayer from the "Te Deum" Handel-Flesch 

March from "The Choice of Hercules" HandeL'Flesch 

Mr. Pepper 
with organ accompaniment played by Mr. Apgar 

II. Melodie from "Orpheus" Christoph Cluck 

Andante Pastorale Paul Taffanel 

Miss Hookins 
with organ accompaniment played by Mr. Apgar 

III. Toccata and Fugue in D minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Chorale Prelude: Sleepers, Awake! Johann Sebastian Bach 

Mr. Apgar 

IV. Air on String Johann "Sebastian Bach 

Sicihenne and Rigaudon Francoeur-Kreisler 

Mr. Pepper 
with organ accompaniment played by Mr. Apgar 

V. Romance from the Suite in C minor Charles Marie Widor 

Evening on the plain Philippe Gaubert 

Miss Hookins 
with organ accompaniment played by Mr. Apgar 

VI. Two Chorale Preludes from Opus 122 Johannes Brahms 

"Adorn thyself, O my soul!" 
"My inmost heart doth yearn." 

Fugue in E flat major (Saint Ann's) Johann Sebastian Bach 

Mr. Apgar 

*Student of Madame Vera Fonaropf and Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
•*Student of Mr. William Kincaid 
***Student of the late Dr. Lynnwood Farn.'\m 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



New Jersey College for Women 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 
Friday Evening, December 5, 1930 at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Florence Frantz, Pianist 

**CoNRAD Thibault, Baritone 

***Carmela Ippolito, Violinist 

fEuGENE Helmer, Accompanist for Miss Ippolito 

tJosEPH RuBANOFF, Accompanist for Mr. Thibault 

PROGRAMME 

I. Prelude in E minor Felix Mendelssohn 

Nocturne in F minor, Opus 55, No. 1 i 

Etude in G flat major. Opus 10, No. 5 f Frederic Chopin 

Etude in r minor, Upus 25, No. 2 i 

Etude in C minor. Opus 10, No. 12 ) 

Miss Frantz 

II. In der Fremde, Opus 39, No. 1 \ 
Intermezzo I 

In der Fremde, Opus 39, No. 8 f 

Mondnacht \ Robert Schumann 

Shone Fremde ( 

Wehmut I 

Friihlingsnacht J 

Mr. Thibault 

III. Poeme Ernest Chausson 

Mss Ippohto 

IV. The Lark Glinka-Balakirew 

Spanish Rhapsody Franz Liszt 

Miss Frantz 

V. Thy Beaming Eyes Edward MacDowell 

So Perverse Frank Bridge 

Sylvia Oley Speaks 

A Piper Michael Head 

When I Think Upon the Maidens Michael Head 

Mr. Thibault 

VI. Improvisation on a Japanese Tune Efrem Zimbalist 

La Gitana Fritz Kreisler 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Impromptu ToR Aulin 

Mss Ippolito 

*Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 
•*Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
fStudents of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

^ lllll l lll l ll l l ll lll l ll l l llll ll l ll Ill li l l liril lil il l ll l ll l l llll l l l l ni lllll H ill m i l I I IMII I I I I II I II I i n i im i Illll ll llll l i iimn mn i i iiiii i iii inini ^ 



GEORGE SCHOOL 

George School, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, December 13, 1930 at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Jeanne Behrend, Pianist 
**FiORENZO Tasso, Tenor 
***Paceli Diamond, Mezzo Soprano 
tJoSEPH Rubanoff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Sonata in G minor, Opus 22 Robert Schumann 

Presto 
Andantino 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 
Finale: Rondo — Presto 
Miss Behrend 

II. Uultima canzone Francesco Tosti 

Vesti la giubba from "Pagliacci" RuGGiERO Leoncavallo 

Mr. Tasso 

III. Manola (Sung in Italian) Pietro Cimara 

Oh Mio Fernando from "La Favorita" Gaetano Donizetti 

Miss Diamond 

IV. Etude in C sharp minor. Opus 25, No. 7 \ 

Waltz in A flat major, Opus 64, No. 3 VFrederic Chopin 

Etude in C minor. Opus 10, No. 12 ) 

Miss Behrend 

V. Rondine al Nido V. De Crescenzo 

Serenade Enrico Toselli 

Mr. Tasso 

VI. A Spirit Flower CampbelL'Tipton 

Ah, Love, but a Day! Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

Hills Frank La Forge 

Miss Diamond 

VII. Tu qui, Santuzza? from "Cavalleria Rusticana" Pietro Mascagni 

Miss Diamond and Mr. Tasso 

*Student of Mr. Josep Hofmann 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



MARYWOOD COLLEGE 

ScRANTON, Pennsylvania 
Wednesday Afternoon, January 7, 1931, at 2.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Presents 

Jeanne Behrend, Pianist 
Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 

PROGRAMME 

I. Variations in F minor Joseph Haydn 

Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. 1"^ 

Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. if Johannes Brahms 

Intermezzo, Opus 118, No. 6i 
Capriccio, Opus 76, No. 8 ^ 

II. Sonata in G minor. Opus 22 Robert Schumann 

Presto 

Andantino 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 

Finale: Rondo — Presto 



III. Etude in C sharp minor, Opus l"). No. 7) 

Valse in A flat major, Opus 64, No. 3 > Frederic Chopin 

Etude in C minor. Opus 10, No. 12 j 

La Cathedrale engloutie -j 

La serenade interrompue > Claude Debussy 

Feux d'Artifice ^ 

Polonaise No. 2 in E major Liszt-Busoni 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



. . ^ "'I '■ iini,".l!r,i,,'! ':!';. ■'l,!Mi:. '.■:■ I'. I'"!!!' '. ' .,.||.,!i:.l.i,IIIH|i,r, ,1. i ■',! , iiiilllillliMlllll' li 

Point Pleasant Beach High School 

Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey 

Friday Evening, January 16, 1931, at 8 o'doc\ 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Cella Gomberg, Violinist 

**Albert Mahler, Tenor 

***Paceli Dl\mond, Mezzo Soprano 

tJoSEPH Rubanoff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Romance from the Concerto in D minor Henri Wiexlwvski 

La Gitana Fritz Kreisler 

Impromptu ToR AuLiN 

Miss Gomberg 

II. Zueignung Richard Strauss 

II mio tesoro intanto from "Don Giovanni". Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
Mr. Mahler 

III. Manola (Sung in Italian) Pietro Cimara 

Oh Mio Fernando from "La Favorita" Gaetano Donizetti 

Miss Diamond 

IV. Praeludium und Allegro Pugnaki-Kreisler 

Tango Albeniz-Kreisler 

Scherzo'Tarantelle Henri Wieniawski 

Miss Gomberg 

V. Passing By Edward Purcell 

Every valley shall be exalted from "The Messiah" 

George Frederic Handel 

Love went A-Riding Frank Bridge 

Mr. Mahler 

\T. A Spirit Flower Campbell-Tipton 

Trees OscAR Rasbach 

Ah, Love, but a Day! KIrs. H. H. A. Be.\ch 

Miss Diamond 

VII. Tu qui, Santuzza? from "Cavalleria Rusticana" Pietro Mascagni 

Miss Diamond and Mr. Mahler 



*Student of M\dame Lea Llboshutz 
**Stiident of Mr. Hcr.^tio Conn ell 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 

fStudent of Mr. H.\rrv K.\lfm.^n in Accompanying 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



:^ iimiiiiiliiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii.iiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiii i mill mill i in nil iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiinillllllllllllllTTnTT a 

The Contemporary Club 

and 

Trenton College Club 

Trenton, New Jersey 
Tuesday Evening, February 3, 1931, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

♦Florence Fr.'^ntz, Pianist 
**Henriette Horle, Soprano 
***Philip Fr.^nk, Violinist 
fBERNAPJ) Frank, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Prelude in E minor Felix MendelsSOHN 

Nocturne in F minor, Opus 55, No. 1 \ 
Etude in G flat major. Opus 10, No. 5 { 

Etude in F minor. Opus 25, No. 2 { Frederic Chopin 

Etude in C minor. Opus 10, No. 12 ) 
Miss Frantz 

II. Les filles de Cadix Leo Delibes 

Meinem Kinde Richard Strauss 

Jewel Song from "Faust" Charles Gounod 

Voci di Primavera JOHANN Strauss 

Miss Horle 

III. Air de Lensky TschaikowskY'Auer 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Introduction et Tarantelle Pablo de Sarasate 

Mr. Frank 

IV. Spanish Rhapsody Franz Liszt 

Miss Frantz 

V. Do not go my Love Richard Hageman 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal Roger Quilter 

A Birthday Huntington Woodman 

Miss Horle 

VI. Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner-Wilhelmj 

The Bee Franz Schubert 

Siciliano and Rigaudon FrancoeuR'Kreisler 

Mr. Frank 

*Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 
**Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufm.\n in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



State Teachers' College 

West Chester, Pennsylvania 
Wednesday Evening, February 4, 19^1, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 
**RosE Bampton, Contralto 
***Philip FR.ANK, Violinist 
fELiZABETH Westmoreland, Accompanist for Rose Bampton 
fBERNARD Frank, Accompanist for Philip Frank 

PROGRAMME 

I. Nine Variations on a Minuet by Duport. . . .Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Ballade in D minor. Opus 10, No. 1 Johannes Brahms 

Rhapsody in F sharp minor, Opus 11, No. 2 Ernst von Dohnanyi 

Miss Halbwachs 

II. Traum durch die Dammerung Richard Strauss 

Crepuscolo Ottorino Respighi 

Nachthed Felix Mendelssohn 

Du Georg Liebling 

Miss Bampton 

III. Air de Lensky Tschaikowsky-Auer 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Scherzo'Tarantelle Henri Wieniawski 

Mr. Frank 



8, No. 3 >. 

js 31 ; 



IV. Berceuse, Opus 57 

Prelude in G major, Opus 28, No. 3 ^ Frederic Chopin 

Scherzo in B flat minor. Opus 

Miss Halbwachs 



V. Jewish Folk Song Marian Coryell 

(First performance in America) 

The Rivals Deems Taylor 

Waiting Marian Coryell 

(First performance in America) 

The Sleigh RiCHARD KouNTZ 

Miss Bcimpton 

VI. Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner-Wilhelmj 

The Bee Franz Schubert 

Sicihano and Rigaudon Francoeur-Kreisler 

Mr. Frank 

*Student of Mr. Josef Hopmann 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tStudents of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



University of Delaware 

Mitchell Hall 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices; NEWARK MUSIC SOCIETY 
Thursday Evening, February 19, J 93 J at 8 o'c]oc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Martha H^lbwachs, Pianist 
**Irene Singer, Soprano 
***Jacob Brodsky, Violinist 

tJosEPH RuBANOFF, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Nine Variations on a Minuet by Duport. . . .Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Ballade in D minor, Opus 10, No. 1 Johannes Brahms 

Rhapsody in F sharp minor. Opus 11, No. 2 Ernst von Dohnanyi 

Miss Halbwachs 

II. Wiegenlied Johannes Brahms 

Wohin? Franz Shubert 

"II est doux, il est bon" from "Herodiade" JULES Massenet 

Miss Singer 

III. Praeludium und Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler 

Melodic Gluck-Kreisler 

Siciliano and Rigaudon '. . . .Francoeur-Kreisler 

Mr. Brodsky 

IV. Berceuse, Opus 57 "j 

Prelude in G major. Opus 28, No. 3 V Frederic Chopin 

Scherzo in B flat minor. Opus 31 ) 

Miss Halbwachs 

V. My lovely CeHa Old English 

Dreams Abram Chasins 

A Spirit Flower Campbell-Tipton 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

Miss Singer 

VI. Slavonic Dance in E minor. No. 2 DvoraK'Kreisler 

Tango AlbeniZ'Kreisler 

Dance of the GobUns Antonio Bazzini 

Mr. Brodsky 

*Student of Mr. Josef Hopmann 
**Studcnt of Miss Harriet van Emden 
***Student of Mr. Eprem Zimbalist 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaupman in Accompanying 

The Steintx^ay is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



^j^ jnm ni i r i i iim ill l ll lll lll l llll l llli iii ii ili iiiii n iii i i n iii iimi i mi m luiiiii i i ii i ii iii nnm i i n i i ii i i i i ii i i iii iniimiiiiiijiiii miii|| | | | | | | g 



GEORGE SCHOOL 

George School, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening. March 7, 1931, at 8:00 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*LiLY Matison, Violinist 
**Benjamin De Loache, Baritone 
***Genia Wilkomirska, Dramatic Soprano 
fEuGENE Helmer, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Air on G String Mattheson-Burmester 

Nocturne LiLl BoULANGER 

Variations on a Theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 

Miss Matison 

II. Caro mio ben Giuseppe Giordani 

Gia il sole dal Gange Alessandro Scarlatti 

Allerseelen Richard Strauss 

Christ Went Up Into the Hills Richard Hageman 

Mr. De Loache 

III. Suicidio! from "La Gioconda" Amilcare Ponchielli 

Traume Richard Wagner 

Habanera and Seguidilla from "Carmen" Georges Bizet 

Miss Wilkomirska 

IV. Habanera Ravel-Kreisler 

Minute Caprice RodE'Thibaud 

Danse Espagnole from ''La Vida Breve" DE FallA'Kreisler 

Miss Matison 

V. Die junge Nonne Franz Schubert 

A Russian Folksong Arranged by A. Dargomyschsky 

Sing to Me, Sing Sidney Homer 

Gypsy Song from "Carmen" Georges Bizet 

Miss Wilkomirska 



VI. 



The Bailiff's Daughter of Islington f Old English 

The Jolly Young Waterman ) 

Beloved, It Is Morn Florence Aylward 

The Pretty Creature Stephen Storage 

Mr. De Loache 

*Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
**Studcnt of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

-TSl 

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The Wednesday Club 

Fahnestock Hall 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday Evening, March 10, 1931, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Jeanne Behrend, Pianist 
**Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
***Philip Frank, Violinist 

fTHEODORE Saidenberg, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Sonata in G minor, Opus 22 Robert Schumann 

Presto 
Andantino 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 

Finale: Rondo — Presto 

Miss Behrend 

II. Recitative and Aria: "Diane Impitoyable" 

from "Iphigenie en Aulide" Christophe Gluck 

Plaisir d'amour Giovanni Martini 

Le The Charles Koechlin 

La Chanson de la Flute from "Hans, le Joueur de la Flute". . .Louis Ganne 
Mr. Thibault 

III. First movement from the "Symphonic espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Mr. Frank 



IV. Etude in C sharp minor, Opus 25, No. 7 

Waltz in A flat major, Opus 64, No. 3 J> Frederic Chopin 

Etude in C minor. Opus 10, No. 12 

Miss Behrend 



} 



V. Do Not Go My Love Richard Hageman 

A Piper Michael Head 

So Contrary Frank Bridge 

Sylvia Oley Speaks 

When I think upon the Maidens Michael Head 

Mr. Thibault 

VI. Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner-Wilhelmj 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Scherzo'Tarentelle Henri Wieniawski 

Mr. Frank 

*Graduate Student of Mr. Josep Hofmann 
**Student of Mr. Emilio df, Gogor:a 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tOraduate student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Lakewood Public Schools 
Young Women's Christian Association 

and 

Council of Jewish Women 

Lakewood, New Jersey 

Saturday Evening, March 21, 1931, at 8: IS o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
artist-students 

*Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 



Owing to illness. Miss Halbwachs is unable to play this evening. 
Mr. William Harms, Artist-Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann, has therefore taken 
her place. His programme will be as follows: 

First Group 

Etude in C minor, Opus 10, No. 12 / t^ ■ - r^ 

Nocturne in F major. Opus H, No. 1 } Frederic Chopin 

Dance of the Gnomes Franz Liszt 

Fourth Group 
Prelude in A minor / „ „ 

Clair de Lune ( Claude Debussy 

Naila Waltz Delibes-Dohnanyi 



IVllSS lldlUWlIl-llO 



V. Do not go my Love Richard Hageman 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal Roger Quilter 

A Birthday Huntington Woodman 

Miss Horle 

VI. Air on G String Mattheson-Burmester 

Rondo in G major Mozart-Kreisler 

Fair Rosmarin Fritz Kreisler 

Malagueiia Pablo de Sarasate 

Mr. Burg 

*Student of Mr. Jcsep Hofmann 
**Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Lakewood Public Schools 
Young Women's Christian Association 

and 

Council of Jewish Women 

Lakewood, New Jersey 

Saturday Evening, March 21, 1931, at 8.1 5" o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
artist-students 

*Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 
**Henriette Horle, Soprano 
***Abe Burg, Violinist 

tJosEPH Rubanoff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Sonata in C minor, Opus 13 (Pathetique) LuDWiG VAN Beethoven 

Grave — Allegro di molto e con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Rondo — Allegro 

Miss Halbwachs 

II. Ridente la calma Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Les filles de Cadix Leo Delibes 

Roselein Robert Schumann 

Caro nome from "Rigoletto" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Horle 

III. Carmen Fantasy BizeT'Hubay 

Mr. Burg 

IV. Six Preludes, Opus 28 Frederic Chopin 

Ballade in F major. Opus 38 Frederic Chopin 

Mss Halbwachs 

V. Do not go my Love Richard Hageman 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal Roger Quilter 

A Birthday Huntington Woodman 

Miss Horle 

VI. Air on G String MatthesoN'Burmester 

Rondo in G major Mozart-Kreisler 

Fair Rosmarin Fritz Kreisler 

Malaguena Pablo de Sarasate 

Mr. Burg 

*Student of Mr. Josef Hopmann 
**Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Western Maryland College 

Westminster, Maryland 
Friday Evening, April 10, 1931, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Ladislaus Steinh.\rdt, Violinist 
**CoNR.\D Thibault, Baritone 
***Edna Corday, Soprano 

tJoSEPH Rubanoff, Accompanist 

PROGRAN^ME 

I. First Movement from the "Symphonie espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Mr. Steinhardt 

II. Recitative and Aria: "Diane impitoyable" 

from "Iphigenie en Aulide" Christophe Gluck 

Plaisir d'amour Giovanni Martini 

Le The Charles Koechlin 

La Chanson de la Flute from "Hans, le Joueur de la Flute". .Louis Ganne 
Mr. Thibault 

III. Tu lo sai . Giuseppe Torelli 

Non so piu cosa son, cosa faccio 

from "The Marriage of Figaro" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Nymphes et Sylvains Hermann Bemberg 

Miss Corday 

IV. Praeludium Bach-Kreisler 

Shepherd's Madrigal Fritz Kreisler 

Polonaise in A major Henri Wieniawski 

Mr. Steinhardt 

V. A Spirit Flower Campbell-Tipton 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Lithuanian Song Frederic Chopin 

Prelude from "A Cycle of Life" Landon Ronald 

Miss Corday 

VI. E'en as a Lovely Flower Frank Bridge 

A Piper Michael Head 

The Roustabout Rupert Hughes 

Lonesome Song of the Plains David Guion 

When I Think Upon the Maidens Michael Head 

Mr. Thibault 

VII. Recitative and Duet: "Doute de la lumiere" 

from "Hamlet" Ambroise Thomas 

Miss Corday and Mr. Thibault 

*Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogcria 
***Gracuate Student of Mad.-\me M^rcell.\ Sembrich 
tStudent of Mr. Harry Kali-m.\x in Accompanying 

The Steixwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



NoRRisTOWN Octave Club 

Y.M.C.A. ^LL 

NoRRiSTOWN, Pennsylvania 

Wednesday Afternoon, April IS, 1931 at 2:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Jean 'Marie Robinault, Pianist) 
**Paul Gershman, Violinist IfTrio 

***Adine Barozzi, Violoncellist ) 
$Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano 
§Sarah Lewis, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Trio in B flat major, Opus 99, for Pianoforte, 

Violin and Violoncello Franz Schubert 

Allegro moderato 
Andante 
Scherzo 

Rondo: Allegro vivace 
Mr. Robinault, Mr. Gershman, Miss Barozzi 

II. Spirate pur, spirate Stefano Donaudy 

Vergebliches Standchen Johannes Brahms 

Und gestern hat er mir Rosen gebracht Joseph Marx 

Soupir Henri Duparc 

Les filles de Cadix Leo Delibes 

Miss Bodanskaya 

III. Trio in E minor, Opus 92, for Pianoforte, 

Violin and Violoncello Camille Saint-Saens 

Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto 
Andante con moto 
Grazioso, poco allegro 
Mr. Robinault, Mr. Gershman, Miss Barozzi 

IV. The Lass with the DeHcate Air Michael Arne 

My Lovely CeHa Old English 

Ah, Love, but a Day! Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

The Sleep that Flits on Baby's Eyes John Carpenter 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Miss Bodanskaya 

♦Student of Mr. David Saperton 
**Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
***Student of Dr. Louis Baillv in Chamber Music 

fThe Trio is under the artistic direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
JStudent of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
§Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



University of Delaware 

Mitchell Hall 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices: Newark Music Society 

Thursday Evening, April 16. 1931 at 8 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*JORGE BoLET, Pianist 
**Henriette Horle, Soprano 
***Ladislaus Steinhardt, Violinist 
fYvONNE Krinsky, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Fantasy and Fugue in G minor Bach-Liszt 

Variations on the Name "Abegg" Robert Schumann 

Mr. Bolet 

II. Ridente la calma Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Mandoline Joseph Szulc 

Heimkehr Richard Strauss 

Caro nome from "Rigoletto" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Horle 

III. First Movement from the "Symphonic espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Mr. Steinhardt 

IV. Waldesrauschen ^ / Franz Liszt 

Fantasia quasi Sonata: "Apres une Lecture du Dante" ( 

Mr. Bolet 

V. By the Fountain Harriet Ware 

Charming Chloe Edward German 

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal Roger Quilter 

A Spring Fancy John Densmore 

Miss Horle 

VI. Praeludium Bach-Kreisler 

Shepherd's Madrigal Fritz Kreisler 

Air on G String Mattheson-Burmester 

Le Zephir Jeno Hubay 

Scherzo'Tarentelle Henri Wieniawski 

Mr. Steinhardt 

*Student of Mr. David Saperton 
**Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Salon Music Club 

Lambertville, New Jersey 

Friday Evening, April 17. 1931 at 8 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 
*EtHEL Stark. Violinist 



NOTICE 

Owing to illness, Miss Ethel Stark is unable to play this evening. Miss Celia Gomberg, 
Artist'Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz, is therefore taking her place, and her programme 
will be as follows: 

First Group 

La Gitana Fritz Kreisler 

Estrellita (Mexican Serenade) Ponce- Heifetz 

Impromptu Tor Aulin 

Fourth Group 

Tango Albeniz-Kreisler 

Lotus Land Scott-Kreisler 

ScherzoTarentelle Henri Wieniawski 



-jr—j --.v...„,^w \-.MAKLliS VALDEZ 

Grand Adagio from "Raymonda" Alexander Glazounoff 

Saltarelle Wieniawski-Thibaud 

Miss Stark 

V. In the Silence of the Night Sergei Rachmaninoff 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

Love Went a-Riding Frank Bridge 

Blue Are Her Eyes Wintter Watts 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Miss Amansky 

VI. The Slighted Swain \ 
The Pretty Creature I 

Come, Let's Be Merry > Old English arranged by Lane Wilson 

My Lovely Celia i 

The Sailor's Life ^ 

Mr. de Long 

*Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Salon Music Club 

Lambertville, New Jersey 
Friday Evening, April 17, 1931 at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Ethel Stark, Violinist 
** Alfred de Long, Bass^haritone 
***Selma Amansky, Soprano 
fSARAH Lewis, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Spanish Dance Granados-Kreisler 

First Movement from the "Symphonie espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Miss Stark 

II. Sorge infausta una procella from "Orlando". . . .George Frederic Handel 

Even Bravest Heart from "Faust" Charles Gounod 

The Happy Lover Old English arranged b_v Lane Wilson 

Aufenthalt Franz Schubert 

Mr. de Long 

III. Standchen des Don Juan Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Ich Hebe Dich Edvard Grieg 

Le soleil et la mer Felix Fourdrain 

Pace, pace, mio Dio from "La Forza del Destino" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Amansky 

IV. Gypsy Serenade Charles Valdez 

Grand Adagio from "Raymonda" Alexander Glazounoff 

Saltarelle Wieniawski-Thibaud 

Miss Stark 

V. In the Silence of the Night Sergei Rachmaninoff 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

Love Went a-Riding Frank Bridge 

Blue Are Her Eyes Wintter Watts 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Miss Amansky 

VI. The Slighted Swain \ 
The Pretty Creature | 

Come, Let's Be Merry > Old English arranged by Lane Wilson 

My Lovely Celia \ 

The Sailor's Life ^ 

Mr. de Long 

*Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the ofEcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



III I III I III MI I I IIII I II II IIIII IIIII II I I II I I I I III liiMl mill lllMlllllliilliiiliiiiii il l lllllllll M l l l lll i n illl l lllllllllll l niniiiiMiniiilliMiliilll II IIII IU I I IIII j 

WESTTOWN SCHOOL 

Westtown, Pennsylvania 
Friday Evening, April 24, 1931 at 7:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Martha Halbwachs, Pianist 
**Florence Irons, Soprano 
***Frances Wiener, Violinist 
fRALPH Berkowitz, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Sonata in C minor, Opus 13 (Pathetique) LuDWiG van Beethoven 

Grave-Allegro di molto e con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Rondo: Allegro 

Miss Halbwachs 

II. Porgi amor from "Le nozze di Figaro" .... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

In mezo al mar Geni Sadero 

Von ewiger Liebe [ Johannes Brahms 

Botschaft C -v # T 

' Miss Irons 

III. Air on G String Mattheson-Burmester 

Mazurka in A minor. Opus 67, No. 4 Chopin-Kreisler 

Guitarre Moszkowski-Sarasate 

Miss Wiener 

IV. Five Waltzes, Opus 39 Johannes Brahms 

Tarantella: "Venezia e Napoli" Franz Liszt 

Miss Halbwachs 

V. Phillis Has Such Charming Graces Old English 

Arranged b>i Lane Wilson 

Happiness RiCHARD Hageman 

Prelude from "A Cycle of Life" Landon Ronald 

Hills Frank La Forge 

Miss Irons 

VI. Malagueiia Albeniz-Kreisler 

On Wings of Song Mendelssohn-Achron 

ScherzoTarentelle Henri Wieniawski 

Miss Wiener 

*Student of Mr. Josep Hopmann 

**Student of Mr. Horatio Conneli, 

***Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaupman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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MARYWOOD COLLEGE 

Solan TON, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday Afternoon, April 28, 1931 at 2 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



ARTIST-STUDENTS 
The String Sluartet 

*Virginia Majewski, Viola 



^Violins 



*LiLY Matison I 

♦Frances WiENERJ " *Brunetta Peterson, Violoncello 

**Albert Mahler, Tenor 
***Ralph Berkowitz, Accompanist 



PROGRAMME 

I. String Quartet in C major, Kochel No. 465 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Adagio-Allegro 
Andante cantabile 
Menuetto : Allegretto 
Allegro molto 
The String Quartet 

II. "Where'er You Walk" from "Semele" George Frederic Handel 

"Ah! fuyez, douce image" from "Manon" Jules Massenet 

L'heure exquise Reynaldo Hahn 

Passing By Edward Purcell 

Hills Frank La Forge 

Mr. Mahler 

III. Berceuse: Variation sur un theme populaire Russe 

M\ximilien d'OsteN'Sacken 

The Mill from the String Quartet, Opus 192, No. 2 Joachim Raff 

Presto from the String Quartet in G major. Opus 77, No. 1. . .Josef Haydn 
The String Quartet 



*Students of Dr. Louis Baillv in Chamber Music 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Mr. H.arry Kaufm.am in Accompanying 

TTie Steinwat is the ofEcial piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Cape May County Art League 

Cape May, New Jersey 
Friday Evening, May 1, 1931 at 8:00 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

♦Ethel Stark, Violinist 
**Walter Vassar, Baritone 
***Irene Singer, Soprano 



NOTICE 

Owing to illness. Miss Irene Singer is unable to sing this evening. Miss Plot' 
ence Irons, Soprano, Artist-Student of Mr. Horatio Connell, is therefore taking 
her place, and her programme will be as follows: 

Third Group 

"Porgi, Amor" from "Le Nozze di Figaro" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Botschaft Johannes Brahms 

L'heure exquise Reynaldo Hahn 

Senta's Ballad from "The Flying Dutchman" Richard Wagner 

Fifth Group 

Phillis Has Such Charming Graces Old English 

Arranged by Lane Wilson 

Happiness Richard Hageman 

Prelude from "A Cycle of Life" Landon Ronald 

The Sleigh Richard Kountz 

Thomas the Rhymer T Carl Loewe 

Tally-Ho! Franco Leoni 

Hills Frank La Forge 

Mr. Vassar 

VII. Duet: "La ci darem la mano" from "Don Giovanni" 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Miss Singer and Mr. Vassar 

•Student of Madame Lea Lldoshutz 
•*Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 

tStudent of Mr. Harrt Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Cape May County Art League 

Cape May, New Jersey 
Friday Evening, May 1, 1931 at 8:00 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Ethel Stark, Violinist 
**Walter Vassar, Baritone 
***Irene Singer, Soprano 

fEuGENE Helmer, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Spanish Dance Granados-Kreisler 

First Movement from the "Symphonie espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Miss Stark 

II. Zueignung Richard Strauss 

Der Atlas Franz Schubert 

"Vision fugitive" from "Herodiade" JuLES Massenet 

Mr. Vassar 

III. "Ebben? Ne andro lontana" from "La Wally" Alfredo Catalani 

An Chloe Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Se saran rose LuiGl Arditi 

Miss Singer 

IV. Gypsy Serenade Charles Valdez 

Grand Adagio from "Raymonda" Alexander Glazounoff 

Saltarelle Wieniawski-Thibaud 

Miss Stark 

V. Love is the Wind Alexander MacFadyen 

My Lovely Celia Old English 

Arranged by Lane Wilson 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

Miss Singer 

VI. "Oh Mistress Mine" from "Twelfth Night" Arthur Sullivan 

Thomas the Rhymer Carl Loewe 

TallyHo! Franco Leoni 

Hills Frank La Forge 

Mr. Vassar 

VII. Duet: "La ci darem la mano" from "Don Giovanni" 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
Miss Singer and Mr. Vassar 

*Student of Madame Lea Ludoshutz 
•*Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
•**Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Haddon Fortnightly Club 

Artisans' Hall 

Haddonfield, New Jersey 

Friday Evening, May 1, 1931 at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Alice Chalifoux, Harpist 
**Agnes Davis, Soprano 
***Paul Gershman, Violinist 
fpLORENCE Frantz, Accompanist 
(Agnes Davis ill. Elsa IVieisKey substituted) 
PROGRAMME 

I. Gavotte from "The Temple of Glory" Jean-Philippe Rameau 

1683-1764 

Giga Arcangelo Corelli 

1658-1713 

Bourree Johann Sebastian Bach 

Miss Chalifoux 1685-i750 

II. "Ritorna vincitor!" from "Aida" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Davis 

III. Melodic Gluck-Kreisler 

Slavonic Dance in G minor Dvorak-Kreisler 

Air on G String Bach-Wilhelm j 

Introduction et Tarantelle, Opus 43 Pablo DE Sarasate 

Mr. Gershman 

IV. Introspection Carlos Salzedo 

Impromptu Gabriel Faure 

Miss Chalifoux 

V. Ich kann's nicht fassen Robert Schumann 

Phillis Has Such Charming Graces Old English 

Arranged by Lane Wilson 

The Soldier's Bride Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Miss Davis 

VI. "Walther's Preislied" from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner- WiLHELMj 

Waltz; in G major. Opus 70, No. 1 Chopin-Spalding 

Nocturne in D major, Opus 27, No. 2 Chopin- Wilhelmj 

Dance of the Goblins Antonio Bazzini 

Mr. Gershman 

*Student of Mr. Carlos Salzedo 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

Lyon and Healy Harp 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



AMtRlCAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Thursday Evening, October 16, 1930, at 8.15 o'CIock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager j 

AIDA 

OPERA IN FOUR ACTS 

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni 
(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

THE KING NICHOLAS KONRATY 

AMNERIS CYRENA VAN GORDON 

AIDA ANNE R05ELLE 

RADAMES AROLDO LINDI 

AMONASRO CHIEF CAUFOLICAN 

RAMFIS IVAN STESCHENKO 

A MESSENGER FIORENZO TASSO 

A PRIESTESS FLORENCE IRONS 

Dances by CATHERINE LlTTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse, DOUGLASS COUDY. 
WILLIAM DOLLAR, and Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. Scene 1— A Hall in the Palace of Pharaoh 

Scene 2 — The Temple of F'htah • 

ACT II. Scene 1 — Amneris' Room in the- Palace 
Scene 2 — The Gates of Thebes 

ACT III. The Temple of Isis on the River Nile , 

ACT IV. Scene 1— A Hall in the Palace of Pharaoh 

Scene 2-— The Temple of Phtah and Crypt Beneath 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAVIMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI FLKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LlTTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LlTTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York, and Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppc &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

1 he Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



« AMbKlUAN AL.AUhMI of MUML. » 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



AIDA 

By GIUSEPPE VERDI 

"Aida," the twenty-seventh of the thirty operas of 
Guiseppe Verdi (including two rewritten ones in this num- 
ber) is, in some respects, the most remarkable of all operas. 
In the first place, it is one of two instances where a 
musical composition written to a definite order, has proved 
to be a great masterpiece; the other being the "Requiem" 
of Mozart. The history of music shows that most works 
composed in these circumstances have been routine and 
hackneyed. In the second place the opera was composed at 
nn age when most composers have long since ceased the labor 
of musical creation. Verdi was nearly sixty years of age 
when "Aida" was composed and, when its merits were in- 
stantly accepted, it was generally assumed that it would 
be the last opera of his distinguished career. But after sixteen 
years, he produced "Otello," and some years later, in 
his eightieth year, he composed "Falstaffo," respectively 
the greatest tragedy and the greatest comedy of the Italian 
operatic repertoire. But, in human and musical appeal, 
"Aida" stands above even these superlative masterpieces. 

"Aida" was completed in 1871, being now (1930) fifty- 
nine years of age, and still retains all of its power, if, 
indeed, its charm and beauty have not been enhanced by 
the passing of the years. It is, certainly the most popular 
opera on the stage today, and this, too, appears to grow 
as time goes on. For many years "II Trovatore" and 
"Faust" were the two operas most frequently performed, 
but today "Aida," although composed much later, has un- 
questionably passed them both in the matter of total per- 
formances. In one recent season, in Philadelphia alone, 
"Aida" was presented seven times by different companies. 

The opera was composed by Verdi on a commission given 
hy Ishmael Pasha, then Khedive of Egypt, for the opening 
of a new opera house in Cairo, which was to be one of 
the largest and most beautiful in the world. The ruler 
desired an opera on an Egyptian subject, and wanted the 
most eminent operatic composer then living, (Verdi), to 
write it. Tne terms were liberal, and Verdi set about the 
work with enthusiasm. The work of composition did not 
take long, although the opera was not written with the speed 
which marked the production of "Trovatore" and "Traviata" 
about twenty years earlier . 

The story of "Aida" is actually a legendary Egyptian tale 
of great antiquity and not a plot made up, as are so many 
operatic stories, by a librettist. The original story was dis- 
covered by Mariette Bey, a famous Egyptologist, who hap- 
pened across it in the course of his researches. The idea 
r.'as submitted to Verdi by representatives of the Khedive, 
and met with his instant approval. Great care was taken 
with the preparation of the libretto, the story being first 
translated into French prose by Camille du Locle, with the 
assistance of Verdi, and was then placed in the hands of 
Antonio Ghislanzoni, Verdi's last librettist before Arrigo 
Boito. The opera was first produced with enormous suc- 
cess at Cairo, on Christmas Eve, 1871. Verdi had been 
invited to attend and conduct, but, always averse to travel 
into foreign countries, he declined. 

The music is notable above all things for its intrinsic 
beauty and fitness to the dramatic situations of the opera 
and for the fact that it is a complete departure from the 



conventional style of Italian opera which Verdi had fol- 
lowed consistently up to that time. It is full of Egyptian 
atmosphere and color, but only in the Temple scene (the 
second scene of the first act) is any authentic Egyptian music 
used. But, as Bizet did in "Carmen," the music, although 
original with the composer, is so imbued with the atmos- 
phere of the land, that it sounds as though the entire musical 
fabric were national in its origin. 

The time of the opera is that of the later Pharoahs, and 
the scenes are laid in the ancient Egyptian cities of Memphis 
and Thebes. Aida is a slave girl, who, unknown to her 
captors, is the daughter of the King of Ethiopia, Amonasro, 
and she has been placed in the service of Amneris, daughter 
of the King of the Egyptians. Radames, a young Egyptian 
warrior, is greatly in love with the beautiful slave girl, and 
is beloved both by her and by Princess Amneris. 

The first act opens with the proclamation that the Ethio- 
pians under King Amonasro have rebelled against the author- 
ity of the Egyptians, and that a leader of the Egyptian armies 
must be chosen at once. The choice falls upon Radames, 
who, in the second scene of the act, receives the sword 
consecrated to the service of the God Phtah (Vulcan), and 
departs for the war. The second act opens in the apart- 
ment of the Princess Amneris and, at the close, there is 
a dramatic scene between Amneris and Aida. The Princess 
suspects that she has a powerful rival for the affections of 
Radames, and she wrests the secret from Aida by declaring to 
her that Radames has been killed in battle. But the second 
scene shows Radames returning victorious with trophies and 
captives, and among the latter the Ethiopian King, Amonasro, 
although his captors do not know his identity. The priests, 
led by the High Priest Ramfis, demand the deata or all the 
prisoners, but the appeals of the people, and finally by 
Radames himself, move the King to release them, holding 
only Aida and Amonasro as hostages. This scene is one of 
the most impressive ones in all opera, musically, scenically 
and dramatically. 

The third act is the famous "Nile scene." Amneris, ac- 
companied by the High Priest, repairs to the Temple to 
pray, on the eve of her marriage to Radames. Aida, ex- 
pecting to meet Radames, is confronted by her father, 
Amonasro, who demands that she learn from Radames the 
plans of the Egyptians in the second invasion of Ethiopia. 
She refuses, but, after a very powerful scene, finally consents. 
Radames appears and after much pleading promises to flee 
with her and also tells her the plans of the Egyptian army, 
of the roads through which they will pass, which Amonasro 
overhears. At this point, Amneris, and the High Priest 
appear from the temple. Radames, Aida, and Amonasro 
flee, pursued by the guards, but Radames returns, surrenders 
his sword to the High Priest and awaits his trial for treason. 

The last act is in two scenes. The first is in the outer 
hall of the Temple where Amneris, alone, overhears Radames 
being tried by the priests for treason. The intensity of this 
scene stands almost alone in all opera for contralto voice 
in its dramatic possibilities. Radames is convicted and sen- 
tenced to be entombed alive in the subterranean vaults of the 
Temple. Amneris, appeals vainly to the, priests as they reap- 
pear. The final scene is in the subterranean chamber to which 
Radames has been taken. There he finds Aida, who has 
succeeded in evading the guards and joins him in death. 
The opera closes as the lovers die, while Amneris, broken- 
hearted, kneels in prayer over their living tomb. 



AMbKlCAN AUAUHMT of MUbIC 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Thursday Evening, October 23, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

Le Jongleur de Notre Dame 

A MIRACLE PLAY IN THREE ACTS 

Adapted by Maurice Lena from a Mediaeval Legend 

(In French) 

Music by Jules Massenet 

JEAN, the Juggler MARY GARDEN 

BONIFACE, the Cook , / CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

THE PRIOR I I IVAN STESCHENKO 

THE POET / ] ALBERT MAHLER 

THE PAINTER ; \ MONKS \ CONRAD THIBAULT 

THE MUSICIAN ( J NICHOLAS KONRATY 

THE SCULPTOR I [ ALFRED DE LONG 

THE CRIER / \ BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

A WAG ABRAHAM ROBOFSKY 

THE APPARITION OF THE VIRGIN ....SALLY GIBBS 

Incidental Dance in Act I by members of the Corps de Ballet 
Time — Fourteenth Century. Place — Place de Cluny. Paris 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT L The Market Place. 
ACT IL A Room in the Abbey. 
ACT in. The Chapel of the Abbey. 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMBTAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAEIEST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILS3ERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York, and Van Horn & Son, Philadelph a. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts,, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe 6? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 

The Statue in Act II, and its counterpart in Act III, were designed and executed by Frank B. A. Linton. 

recently decorated by the Government of France with the rank of "'Officier d'Academie." 
The Viola d'Amour solos in Acts I and III are played by Samuel Lifschey, who uses an old Italian instrument 

from the collection of The Philadelphia Orchestra Association. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Le Jongleur de Notre Dame 

"Le Jong'eur de Notre Dame" (The Juggler of Our 
Lady) is an operatic version of an ancient Mediaeval 
legend, found originally in Anatole France's "Etui de 
Nacre." The opera was first produced early in 1892 at 
Monte Carlo, and it was two years later before it found 
its way to Paris, the goal of all French operas. The role 
of Jean (the Juggler) was originally written for tenor voice 
and was so sung at Monte Carlo. But, in the interval 
between that time and the first production in Paris, 
Massenet had changed the role into one for soprano and 
ever since, it has been sung by a woman. Miss Garden 
has made the role as completely her own as she has made 
that of "Thais," the opera originally composed by Massenet 
like "Esclarmonde," for Sybil Sanderson. 

The action of "Le Jongleur" is laid in the Place de 
Cluny, near Paris, in the Fourteenth Century and the first 
act opens in the square before the abbey. It is both May- 
day and market-day and a merry crowd surrounds the 
venders, the young people singing and dancing. They hear 
Jean, the juggler, approaching, playing his viele and wel- 
come him. He announces himself as the King of Jugglers 
but is greeted derisively by the crowd, who dub him "King 
Famine" and laugh at his poor, thinly-clad appearance. He 
performs a few ordinary tricks, which are laughed at by 
the crowd and derided as "old and stale." In desperation, 
he suggests singing a new drinking song, "Alleluia du 
vin." First asking the pardon of the Virgin, saying that 
he is forced by hunger to sing the song, he gives it and it 
is joyously received by the crowd, who join at the close 
in the "Alklulia." As is ends, the door of the abbey is 
suddenly opened by the Prior himself, who has heard the 
song and is furious at the sacrilege. The angry Prior in- 
stantly scatters the crowd and, turning to Jean, berates 
him vigorously, painting a terrifying word picture of the 
torments in the next world that await one of his calling. 
The Prior then urges the terrified Jean, who has fallen 
on his knees before the N'irgin, to renounce his juggling 
and become a brother in the abbey. Jean protests that he 
is still young and loves the wandering life, but the Prior 
points out that life in the abbey means the saving of his 
soul and body. At this point, Boniface, the abbey cook, 
arrives with a donkey laden wi;h provisions for the 
brethren and he takes out the articles of food and describes 
them one by one. Jean's hunger conquers, he consents to 
enter the brotherhood and goes into the building with the 
Prior and the cook. 

The second act opens with preparations for the celebra- 
tion of the Feast of the Assumption. The brethren are all 
engaged upon some special work in honor of the Virgin, 
the sculptor working on a statue, the painter tinting it, 
the poet writing an ode and the musician composing music. 
Jean sits aside, grieving because of them all, he alone has 
nothing to offer his beloved Holy Lady and is unable even 
to join in praises of Her, because he understands no Latin. 
The monks quarrel between themselves as to which of 



their arts is the best, each claiming this honor for his own 
branch. The Prior impatiently interrupts the dispute and 
orders the quarrelers to embrace each other, which they 
do with a bad grace. Boniface then tells Jean that the 
Virgin also "understands French" and that all things, no 
matter how humble, are acceptable to Her, offered sin- 
cerely. The cook admits that he understands litle Latin 
himself and relates to the despondent juggler the story 
of the sage-bush which opened and concealed the infant 
Jesus when He and His Mother were pursued by enemies. 
Thus, continues the cook, the sage became the first among 
all flowers. Boniface's story determines Jean to make 
to the Virgin the only offering he can — his juggler's tricks, 
his dances and his songs. 

The third act reveals Jean at night, before the altar of 
the N'irgin in the abbey, doing his tricks before the image. 
Bowing reverently to Her, with cap in hand, he does his 
best, dancing faster and faster until he falls exhausted 
at the foot of the altar where he prostrates himself in pro- 
found adoration. In the meantime, the Prior accompanied 
by one of the monks, and by Boniface, has entered, and 
unobserved by Jean, has witnessed the close of the dance. 
The Prior would interfere, but is held back by Boniface, 
who points out that David danced before the Ark of the 
Covenant and observes "David was no pagan." At the 
close, the monks who have assembled are about to throw 
themselves furiously upon the juggler for what they deem 
to be his sacrilege, when Boniface, pointing to the image, 
cries "A miracle!" The face of the Virgin has illumined 
with a smile and a celestial glow appears as she spreads 
her hands over the figure of the prostrate juggler in bless- 
ing and in acceptance of his homage. As they view it, the 
monks sink to their knees, overawed by this miracle of 
love and maternal protection. As Jean kneels at the foot 
of the altar, he looks up and sees, for the first time, the 
celestial glow, the smile and the hands extended over him 
in blessing. He dies at Her feet, transfixed with ecstacy 
and exaltation, as a chorus of angels is heard from afar. 

In "Le Jongleur," Massenet departed widely from his 
earlier works. The usual passionate and at times saccha 
rine style has given way to that of the church and the 
monastery and the composer has intensified this by the use 
here and there of the Gregorian chant, of church modes 
and some ancient folk-song, thus creating a mediaeval 
atmosphere. Some of the finest numbers in the opera are 
the prelude to the opening act, the "Allelulia du vin, 
sung by Jean just before the appearance of the Prior, and 
especially the song of Boniface when he appears with the 
donkey and describes the food which he will prepare, the 
music here being a curious but interesting mixture of 
joviality and plain song. These are all in the first act. 
In the second act, the prelude is again an outstanding 
number, but Boniface's Legend of the Sage-Bush is, per- 
haps the vocal feature of the act. In the concluding act, 
the principal numbers are Jean's address to the Virgin,! 
his songs in Her honor and the celestial chorus whicbj 
closes the opera. 



AMERICAN ACADHMT of MUiilC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 t 

Thursday Evening, October 30, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

GIANNIfSCHICCHI I 

COMEDY IN ONE ACT ! 

BOOK BY GIOVACCHINO FORZANO 

(In Italian) 
MUSIC BY GIACOMO PUCaNI 

GIANNI SCHICCHI . . CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

LAURETTA NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

ZITA PACELI DIAMOND 

RINUCCIO ALBERT MAHLER 

GHERARDO DANIEL HEALY 

NELLA AGNES DAVIS 

BETTO ABRAHAM ROBOFSKY 

SIMONE IVAN STESCHENKO 

MARCO CONRAD THIBAULT 

LA CIESCA HENRIETTA HORLE 

SPINELLOCCIO BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

AMANTIO ALFRED DE LONG 

PINELLINO ARTHUR HOLMGREN 

GUCCIO WALTER VASSAR 

GHERARDINO VITALE ANGELUCCI 

CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

STAGE DIRECTOR W'lLHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. , 



To be followed by 

PAGLIACCI 



OPERA IN TWO ACTS, WITH A PROLOGUE j 

(In Italian) i 

Book and Music by RUGGIERO LEONCAVALLO ' 

NEDDA HELEN JEPSON 

CANIO AROLDO LINDI 

TONIO JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

BEPPE ALBERT MAHLER 

SILVIO CONRAD THIBAULT 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILS3ERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes for Gianni Schicchi especially designed and executed by Van Horn e? Son, Philadelphia. 

Costumes for Pagliacci by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punrel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &" Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



3C AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Gianni Schicchi 

By Giacomo Puccini 

"Gianni Schicchi" is the third opera of a tryptich 
which Puccini wrote after "La Rondine." The tryptich 
consists of three operas each in one act and the orig- 
inal plan of the composer was that they should be per- 
formed in a single evening. This was done at the 
fir^t jiresentations of the works but the uneveness of 
the operas, especially the lack of interest in both music 
and story of the second of the three "Suor Angelica" 
caused impresarios to separate them. The first perform- 
ance of the three operas anywhere was at the Metro- 
politan Opera House in New York by the Metropolitan 
Opera Company on December 14, 1918, and they were 
given at the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia 
by the same company the following week. 

Of the three operas, "Gianni Schicchi" is infinitely 
the best. The action is laid in Florence in 1299, and the 
story is based upon an allusion in Dante"s "Divina Corn- 
media." Briefly, the opera tells the story of the rela- 
tives of a wealthy Florentine who has just died, leav- 
ing all his wealth to the church. The relatives persuade 
Gianni Schicchi to assist them and he, impersonating 
the deceased L'uoso, calls i:a a notary and makes a new- 
will in which he leaves most of the wealth to himself. 
The relatives are exceedingly angry but can do nothing 
on account of the strict laws governing such cases. 

To this Utile story which is really more complex than 
appears, as there is a love affair between the daughter 
of Gianni and the son of one of the relatives, Puccini 
has written the most buoyant music which is to be found 
in any of his operas; indeed, some authorities consider 
it to he HI certain respects, especially of orchestration, 
his finest operatic work. In the music the composer has 
caught something of the spirit of "Falstaff" and it was 
a decided departure from his usual operatic subjects 
which had been heretofore either tragic or sentimental. 
However, in some of the earlier works, Puccini had 
shown himself to be possessed of a keen sense of humor, 
such as the scene of the Sacristan in the first act of 
"Tosca" and in certain parts of "La Boheme." But in 
"Gianni Schicchi" this humor finds full play and the 
composer has rarely given greater characterization music- 
ally than in this comedy. The orchestration and the 
tise of the voices in the opening scene in which the rela- 
tives bewail the passing of l'uoso and at the same time 
try to find out how he has left his wealth, is a mas- 
terpiece of humor in music. Perhaps the most famous 
single numical number in the opera is Lauretta's aria 
"Oh, mio babbino caro" if it can be called an aria, as 
the work, following Puccini's general style, has few set 
numbers. 

The tryptich of Puccini was constructed on three tales 
of radically different type. The first of the group "II 
Tabarro" (The Cloak) was taken from Didier Gold's 
"La Houppelnnde" and is pure melodrama, but of a 
peculiarly grisly kind to which Puccini has set music of 
great dramatic power. The second, "Suor Angelica," 
is sentimental and weak in character as to story and 
Puccini, who followed his libretti musically closer than 
almost any other composer, has written music of the 
same character. "Gianni Schicchi" has an astonishingly 
fine libretto in addition to being an intensely humorous 
story in itself, and Puccini has matched it with his music. 



Pagliacci 

By Ruggiero Leoncavallo 

In the flood of operas based on the general lines of 
Mascag ni's "C avalleria Rusticana," which followed hard 
upon the heels of that amazingly successful work, and 
which Streatfeild terms "crime operas," only one was 
conspicuously successful, Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci." Al- 
most universally linked in performance with "Cavalleria" 
as a double bill, it is somewhat of a novelty to hear 
"Pagliacci" performed in contrast to a work on humor- 
ous lines such as "Gianni Schicchi." The Leoncavallo 
opera was composed for the publisher Sosogno and was 
produced with sensational success in Milan on May 21, 
1892, from whence it proceeded to triumph all over 
the w'orld. The composer wrote his own libretto and, 
as in his other operas, none of which achieved per- 
manent success, he shows great dramatic ability and a 
fine feeling for stage effects. 

The story is very simple. The Pagliacci are a group 
of itinerant mountebanks who travel from village to 
village in the more remote parts of Italy, the scene of 
the opera being laid in Calabria on the Feast of the 
Assumption. The characters are Nedda, the Columbine; 
Canio. master of the troupe and intensely in love with 
Nedda; Tonio, the clown; Beppe, the Harlequin, and 
Silvio, a villager. The first of the two acts open in 
the outskirts of a tiny setlement at which the troupe 
has just arrived, to the delight of the villagers, the per- 
formance to be given in the evening. Tonio tries to 
make love to Nedda but she repulses him finally, as he 
persists, slashing him with a whip. Tonio vows revenge 
and soon after, overhearing and seeing Nedda accept the 
advances of Silvio, seeks Canio whom he brings to the 
scene, restraining him with difficulty from immediately 
rushing upon the pair. Canio finally breaks away but 
Silvio escapes. On his return, Canio demands of Nedda 
the name of her lover but she refuses to tell and Canio 
tries to stab her but is prevented by Beppe. The act 
closes with the final preparations for the evening per- 
formance. 

The second act opens with the stage play and the 
little sketch in an almost exact duplication of the per- 
sonal relations of the members of the troupe. Colum- 
bine, who is to poison her husband, is entertaining her 
lover while the clown watches for the return of the hus- 
band. When he appears the play becomes reality. Canio 
demands the name of the lover and Nedda, realizing 
the situation, calls upon Silvio, who is in the audience, 
to save her, but Canio stabs her to the heart and, 
as Silvio rushes up, slays him with the same dagger. 

"Pagliacci," as swift-moving and intense in its action 
as any one-act opera in the repertoire, is filled with 
melodies which have made their way, via the concert 
stage, all over the world. Especially famous is the Pro- 
logue, sung by Tonio in front of the curtain at the 
beginning of the opera, a song in the repertoire of 
every baritone in the world. Other fine numbers are 
the so-called "bell chorus" in the first act, the beauti- 
ful cavatina of Nedda, more pojiularly known as the 
"Bird Song," the duet with Silvio and the passionate 
declamation of Canio which closes the act and variously 
known as The Lament, "Ride Pagliaccio," or "Vesta 
la giubba." In the second act, there is the graceful 
serenade of Beppe, the dance music, and that which 
accompanies the tragic denouement. 



AMtKICAN ACAUHMT of MUbIC 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Thursday Evening, November 6, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR 



Book by Salvatore 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

Cammerano, After Sir Walter Scott's Tragic Novel, 
"The Bride of Lammermoor" 

(In Italian) 



Music by GAETANO DONIZETTI 

LUCIA JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

ENRICO ASHTON CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

EDGARDO DI RAVENSWOOD JOSEF WOLINSKI 

RAIMONDO IVAN STESCHENKO 

ARTURO BUCKLAW ALBERT MAHLER 

ALISA ROSE BAMPTON 

NORMANNO DANIEL HEALY 



Place — Scotland 



Time — Close of Sixteenth Cenlury 



CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 



ACT I. 



ACT II. 



ACT III. 



SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

Scene 1 — A Valley in the Forest near Lammermoor Castle 
Scene 2 — The Park of the Castle 

Scene 1 — Ashton's Room in the Castle 
Scene 2 — Ceremonial Hall of the Castle 

Scene 1 — Banquet Hall of the Castle 
Scene 2 — Ravenswood Burial Ground 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes hy Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

l-'urniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSI 



X 



STORY| OF THE (OPERA 

5)/ Samuel L. Laciar 



Lucia di Lammermoor 

By Gaetano Donizetti 

Gaetano Donizetti, one of the most prolific of 
all opera composers, composed sixty-six stage works 
in his brief life of fifty-one years. Among them 
are some exceedingly fine works, such as "Anna 
Bolena" which first won him popularity outside of 
Italy, "Lucrezia Borgia," "La Favorita," "Don Pas- 
quale" which was written especially for Grisi, Mario, 
Tamburini and Lablache, probably the finest cast 
that ever appeared in any one opera, and "Lucia 
di Lammermoor." Of these, the last is unquestion- 
ably his most popular work and by common con- 
sent, also his masterpiece. 

The opera is now rapidly approaching its 100th 
birthday, as it was first produced in Naples on 
September 26, 183 5, since which time its popularity 
has never waned. The two leading roles of the 
opera were expressly written for Mme. Persiani and 
Louis Duprez, the French tenor, who had spent 
ten years in Italy, and these artists created the roles 
at the premiere of the work. The story is based 
upon Sir Walter Scott's novel "The Bride of Lam- 
mermoor," but the Scotch tragedy is seen through 
very Italian eyes in the libretto. The scene is laid 
in Scotland about 1669. 

Sir Henry Ashton of Lammermoor has arranged 
a marriage between his sister Lucy (Lucia) and Sir 
Arthur Bucklaw, a wealthy young Scotch noble- 
man, by means of which Sir Henry hopes to re- 
trieve the financial and political fortunes of his 
family, both of which have become distastrously 
involved through his own acts. However, Sir Ed- 
gar Ravenswood, his bitter enemy, is deeply in 
love with Lucia who returns his aifection and they 
become secretly engaged just before Sir Edgar is 
sent to France upon an important political mission. 
Sir Edgar's letters to Lucia are intercepted by Sir 
Henry and his servant Normanno, and she is led 
to believe that her lover has made no effort to 
communicate with her since he left. Finally, Sir 
Henry shows his sister a forged letter purporting 
to be fron' Sir Edgar and containing what seems 
to the unhappy girl positive proof of his infidelity 
to her. Staggered with grief, Lucia consents to be- 
come the v/ife of Sir Arthur Bucklaw. Just as she 
has signed the marriage compact. Sir Edgar ap- 
pears and i^nters the great hall where the ceremony 
has been completed. Learning what has transpired. 
Sir Edgar seizes the marriage contract, tramples 
it under foot and leaves the hall, uttering fierce 
imprecatiors upon the house of Lammermoor. Sir 
Henry follows and a bitter quarrel ensues, culmi- 
nating in an agreement to fight a duel in the church 
yard. 

Meanwhile, at night, after the marriage of Lucia 
and Sir Arthur Bucklaw, a noise is heard from their 
rooms and attendants, rushing in, find that Lucia's 
grief has made her insane and that she has slain 
her husband with a dagger. When reason returns 
to her and she realizes what she has done, the 



knowledge of her deed and the full horror of her 
situation overwhelm her and she expires from grief 
and remorse. Meanwhile, ignorant of what has 
transpired. Sir Edgar goes to the churchyard of 
Ravenswood, where the duel with Sir Henry is to 
be fought. While awaiting the arrival of his op- 
ponent and his supporters, he hears the castle-bell 
at Lammermoor toll the death-knell and attendants 
arrive, telling the unfortunate lover of the death of 
Lucia, whereupon Sir Edgar kills himself among 
the tombs of his ancestors. 

The opera has many interesting musical features. 
Chief among these is the famous sextet, which oc- 
curs in the opera upon the sudden appearance of 
Sir Edgar in the hall of Lammermoor castle. It is 
unquestionably the finest piece of concerted writ- 
ing that the composer ever did and in Italian opera 
of the older kind, ranks with the quartet from 
"Rigoletto" in the effective manner in which the 
voices are used. Next in importance comes the 
great tenor aria of the last act, which again is 
Donizetti's finest bit of composition for tenor, 
despite "Una furtiva Lagrima" from "L'Elisir d' 
Amore" and other famous numbers. The so-called 
"Mad Scene" has been for nearly a century, a great 
favorite with coloratura sopranos and is an excep- 
tionally brilliant number although, in the strides 
towards realism which opera has made during the 
past fifty or seventy-five years, the melody today 
scarcely seems to carry out the idea of insanity. 
There are also the two great arias for Lucia in the 
first act, the passionate duet marking the farewell 
of the lovers in the same act, and the powerful 
duet between Lucia and Sir Henry in the second. 
The music throughout is generally sombre as befits 
the tragic story, but in spite of this, it is never 
monotonous. 

Donizetti wrote always for the singers, using the 
orchestration of the Italian opera composers of his 
day, merely to support the voices and never taking 
any part in the emotional development of the opera. 
He was generally satisfied to write pure melody and 
leave the matter of expression to his singers, so 
that there is some justification in Wagner's refer- 
ence to the Italian opera orchestra of that period 
as "a big guitar." But Donizetti, Rossini and 
Bellini, to assume the principal roles in their operas, 
had a group of singers such as the world had never 
before heard — or has not heard since. Besides his' 
unquestioned musical talent, Donizetti had con- 
siderable literary facility, as he not only designed 
but actually wrote the libretto of the last act of 
"Lucia di Lammermoor" and also that of the last 
act of "La Favorita," which is one of the strongest 
of his tragic works, and he also translated the 
libretti of at least two operas into Italian, from the 
original French. His speed at work may be seen 
from the fact that he wrote the libretto of the little 
one-act operetta "II Campanello di Notte," com- 
posed the music, the work was rehearsed and per- 
formed, all within the space of nine days. Of his 
sixty-six stage works a scant half dozen are today 
known at all outside of Italy. 



AMtKIL-AN AL-AUtMY of MUblL. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 f 

i 

Thursday Evening, November 13, 1930, at 8 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

BORIS GODOUNOV 

OPERA IN FOUR ACTS WITH A PROLOGUE 
Founded Upon Poushkin and Karamzin's Historical Drama, "BORIS GODOUNOV" 

I In Russian) 

Book and Music by MODESTE PETROVICH MOUSSORGSKY 

BORIS GODOUNOV, Tsar of Russia IVAN STESCHENKO 

FEODOR, his son IRENE PETINA 

XENIA, his daughter CHARLOTTE SYMONS 

NURSE to Feodor and Xenia I xfAj^jx: vr\cxrT:T^ 

HOSTESS of the Inn f MARIE KOSHETZ 

GREGORY, THE FALSE DMITRI IVAN DNEPROFF 

PIMEN, an old monk NICHOLAS KONPATY 

VARLAAM \ , . u A \A \. / MICHAEL Sm-'ETZ 

MISSAIL I Vagabond Monks | j^g^P KALLINI 

MARINA MNICHEK, beloved of Gregory GENIA WILKOMIRSKA 

PRINCE SCHUISKY JOSEF LVOV 

SCHELKALOV CONRAD THIBAULT 

PRISTAV ABRAHAM ROBOfSKY 

THE INNOCENT i athpdt ^^atjtcd 

THE HERALD \ ALBERT MAHLER 

KRUSTCHOV BENJAMIN DE LO/.CHE 

LAVITSKY DANIEL H£ALY 

CHERNIAKOVSKY ARTHUR HOLMGREN 



CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 



Prologue 



ACT. I. 



ACT 
ACT 
ACT 



II. 
III. 
IV. 



SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
Scene 1 — Courtyard of a Monastery in Moscow 
Scene 2 — The Kremlin 
Scene 1 — Cell in the Monastery 
Scene 2 — An Inn near the Frontier 
Apartment of the Tsar in the Kremlin 
Marina's Garden 



Scene 1- 
Scene 2- 



-The Forest of Kromy 

-Session of the Duma in the Kremlin 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HA]\^'MER 

Conductor EMIL MLYN/ RSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI EI.KAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes especially designed by Helen Stevenson West, and executed by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William PunzeT, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &" Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



^ AMbKlCAN ACAUhMT of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Boris Godounov 

By Modeste Petrovich Moussorgsky 



Few works in the history of the opera have had tlie 
varied experiences which have befallen "Boris Godounov," 
perhaps the most characteristically Russian of all operas, 
as its composer, Modeste Petrovich Moussorgsky, is now 
generally acknowledged to have expressed the real spirit 
of Russia in his music, more accurately and feelingly 
than any other composer of his race. 

The work is in four acts, with a prologue and eight 
tableaux, being actually a series of pictures from Russian 
history, dealing with the accession to the throne of the 
Tsars by Boris, after the assassination of the Tsarewitch 
Dmitri, a child of six years. Ambition which would 
stop at nothing, combined with remorse for his awful 
deed, are the principal elements of the drama. Like 
most of his compatriots, Moussorgsky went to Poushkin 
for his story, finding it in that great poet and dramatists' 
stage work "Boris Godounov," a classic of Russian 
literature. The drama, which was founded on material 
in Karamziu's "History of Russia" dates from 1824, but 
it was half a century later before the opera was produced. 

The insane cruelty of Ivan the Terrible had deprived 
Russia of almost every strong and independent spirit 
except Boris Godounov, a Boyard of Tatar origin. As 
the brother-in-law and Regent of Feodor, the half-witted 
heir of Ivan the Terrible, Boris was virtually ruler of 
Russia before the ambition to wear the crown himself 
seized him. Only the six-year-old child Dmitri stood in 
his way. In 1581 Dmitri was murdered and suspicion 
fell on Boris. He cleverly exculpated himself and later 
was chosen Tsar to succeed Feodor. He ruled wisely, 
but his Nemesis appeared in the person of the monk 
Gregory, the False Dmitri, who was eagerly supported 
by the Poles. Boris, who was then near madness with 
the pangs of conscience, felt that the people who never 
quite resigned themselves to a Tatar Tsar, wavered in 
their allegiance and the Poles took advantage of this 
situation to advance on Moscow. Boris, at this junc- 
ture, was seized with a fatal illness and with his last 
breath appointed his son, also a Feodor, as his successor. 

The prolcgue opens in the courtyard of the Novo- 
Dievichy monastery in Moscow, where a crowd has gath- 
ered and officers with threats and blows demand that 
they entreat Boris to accept the throne, but he is in no 
haste to reap the fruits of his crime. In the second 
scene, he accepts and the great coronation scene follows 
as he passes from one cathedral to the other, to receive 
his crown. 

The first scene of the first act is in the cell of the 
monk Pimen, where he is writing, while the younger 
monk Gregory lies asleep. The youth awakes and Pimen 
tells him that Boris, the new Tsar, is the murderer 
of the child Dmitri. Old Pimen says that he closed his 
chronicle with the murder and that Gregory, who is 
the age Dmitri would have been had he lived, should 
continue it. The second scene is in an inn on the 
Lithuanian border. Two vagabond monks enter, followed 
by Gregory, now the False Dmitri. Officers appear with 



a warrant, which Gregory reads, describing Varlaam, the 
elder monk. He is about to be led away, when he asks 
to read the warrant, which proves to be for Gregory, 
who leaps out of the window and escapes. 

The second act opens in the apartments of the Tsar, 
where Boris is with his children, Xenia and Feodor 
and their nurse. He broods over the misfortunes which 
surround him, the revolt in Poland, the plotting of his 
nobles, the plague and famine that ravish the land. 
Prince Shouisky enters and tells Boris that a pretender 
has arisen in Poland and that it is young Dmitri come 
to life. Then follows one of the greatest scenes of the 
opera as Boris overcome with remorse and fear, imagines 
he again sees the murdered Tsarewich. The next act is 
laitl in Marina's garden in Poland, Moussorgsky having 
added it to his original work to secure a "love interest" 
which the directors of the Maryinski Theatre deemed 
imperative. Marina, daughter of a Polish noble, dreams 
of becoming Tsarina, as Dmitri (Gregory) loves her. 
In this scene Dmitri overhears the Poles planning to 
overthrow Boris and Marina urges him to go to Moscow 
at once and seize the throne of Russia. 

The last act opens in the forest of Kromy. This 
scene Moussorgsky originally intended to close the work, 
but was persuaded to insert it ahead of the death of 
lioris on the grounds that it would be an anti-climax in 
the form in which he planned it. An uprising has 
taken place and the peasants have captured a nobleman 
and are tormenting him. The vagabond monks appear 
and urge the crowd to overthrow Boris and put Dmitri 
on the throne. Then comes the Village Fool, teased 
by boys and finally Dmitri's troops and himself on horse- 
back. The procession passes leaving the Fool alone in 
a snowstorm and prophesying woe to Russia as he lies 
down in the snow. 

The last scene is in the chamber of the Duma to find 
means of crushing the revolt of Dmitri and is filled with 
"the horror that waits on Princes." The climax has 
been carefully built up with the half-veiled insanity of 
Boris, restrained before the members of the Duma, the 
interview with the aged Pimen who destroys his last 
hope that the cliild Dmitri might after all, have escaped 
death. At this point Boris shrieks for air and calls 
for his son, who is brought in haste. Having named 
him as the next Tsar, given his advice as to his conduct 
in that exalted place and prayed for his protection, the 
harassed spirit of Boris passes. 

The opera was first presented at the Maryinski Theatre 
of (then) St. Petersburg, January 24, 1874, and was not 
entirely successful. In 1896 a new version with har- 
monization and orchestration revised by Rimsky-Korsakov 
was brought out and this is the now generally accepted 
version. The work in concert form with Moussorgsky's 
original orchestration was produced for the first time in 
.\merica by the Philadelphia Orchestra a year ago (in 
the fall of 1929), and fully vindicated Rimsky-Korsakov's 
judgment in his revision. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Thursday Evening, November 27, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 



TOSCA 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

Book by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, after the drama, "La Tosca," 
by Victorien Sardou 

(In Italian) [ 

Music by GIACOMO PUCCINI 

FLORIA TOSCA BIANCA SAROYA 

MARIO CAVARADOSSI RICHARD CROOKS 

(American debut in Grand Opera) 

BARON SCARPIA CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

CESARE ANGELOTTI IVAN STESCHENKO 

A SACRISTAN ABRAHAM ROBOFSKY 

SPOLETTA , ALBERT MAHLER 

SCIARRONE ALFRED DE LONG 

A GAOLER BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

A SHEPHERD BOY ROSE BAMFTON 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. The Church of Sant' Andrea Delia Valle j 

ACT II. Scarpia's Apartment in the Farnese Palace | 

ACT III. The Platform of the Castle Sant' Angelo 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

h'urniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



5C AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



TOSCA 

By Giacomo Puccini 

"Tosca" is the fifth of the operatic works of Giacomo 
Puccini and by common consent, is regarded as one of 
his finest. The story was taken by the librettists, Giacosa 
and Illica, from Sardou's melodrama of the same name, 
and the opera had its first production at the Costanzi 
Theatre in Rome on January 14, 1900. It seems, with 
Charpentier's "Louise," Debussy's "Pelleas et Melisande," 
and Wolf-Ferrari's "The Jewels of the Madonna" to be 
almost the only opera produced in the last thirty years 
which has won its way into the permanent repertoire of 
all the leading companies of the world. 

The Sardou drama has been closely followed by the 
librettists. The story, which is intensely dramatic, deals 
chiefly with the love of Floria Tosca, an Italian singer, 
her lover, Mario Cavaradossi, the painter, and Baron 
Scarpia, prefect of police of Rome. Cavaradossi is 
arrested by the orders of Scarpia, for haying assisted 
a political prisoner to escape. Scarpia, having con- 
ceived a violent attachment for Tosca, puis her lover 
to torture in her hearing and she buys his release by 
promising herself to Scarpia, who has condemned 
Cavaradossi to death. Scarpia gives orders for a sham 
execution and after having signed a safe-conduct for the 
pair is slain by Tosca. The execution, however, proves 
to be a real one and Tosca, on the verge of arrest for 
the assassination of Scarpia, throws herself from the 
top wall of the prison. 

Like many another opera which has later proved to 
be a masterpiece, "Tosca" did not meet with an over- 
whelming success at its inilial performance. The reason 
for this was not because of any lack in the music nor 
in the libretto, which is singularly direct and to the 
point; but 'because of the astounding popularity of "La 
Boheme" and "Manon Lescaut," the two previous operas 
of the composer, expectations in Italy had reached a 
point regarding the new work which could not possibly 
have been fulfilled by any composer. Later, as a more 
deliberate judgment was taken, musicians saw that Puc- 
cini had produced another opera fully as great as the 
two that had preceded it. In fact, many capable musicians 
believe that in "Tosca" Puccini has reached his greatest 
heights as a dramatic composer. 

In the music, Puccini makes one of his rare excursions 
into the use of themes, or at least one, denoting certain 
personages in the opera. This is used at the very begin- 
ning of the opera, the three dark-colored, gloomy chords 
which appear frequently afterwards on the appearance 
of Scarpia. There is no overture and none is needed 
for the short violent action of the opera. The music of 
the opening act is mainly dialogue between Cavaradossi, 



Angelotti, the Sacristan, the one semi-humorous character 
of the tragedy, and Tosca. This dialogue culminates in 
the beautiful tenor aria "Recondita armonia" followed 
by the fine duet between Tosca and Cavaradossi. The 
entrance of Scarpia is very dramatic and the finale is' 
most effective, the soliloquy of Scarpia, "Va Tosca nel 
tuo cuor s'annida Scarpia" being sung against the ringing 
of bells and the Te Deum of the people. 

All through, "Tosca" has not many set numbers, as 
the music mainly accompanies the dialogue and this is 
especially the case in the second act, which is laid in 
Scarpia's apartment in the Farnese Palace. The chief 
aria of the act is Tosca's "Vissi d'arte vissi' d'amore non 
feci," which is her plea to Scarpia for mercy for her 
lover and herself. A skillful piece of musical writing 
occurs early in the act where the music accompanying 
the entertainment of the Queen in honor of the victory 
of the Italian armies is heard off-stage while Cavaradossi 
is undergoing examination and later, torture at the hands 
of Scarpia's minions. The music accompanying the inter- 
view between Scarpia and Tosca, the later slaying of 
the Prefect of Police by Tosca and her stealthy escape 
from the palace must be considered as among Puccini's 
best numbers, so exactly does it fit the tragic events being 
depicted upon the stage. 

The third act opens with daybreak upon the roof and 
execution place of the prison and here for a few 
moments, the composer has introduced an effective con- 
trast by the use of pastoral music. This soon ends, 
however, as Cavaradossi is led to the spot where he is 
to be executed. He bids farewell to Tosca in one of 
the most beautiful pieces of music Puccini has ever 
written, to an accompaniment of four violoncelli, followed 
by the great tenor aria "E lucevan le stelle." The duet 
with Tosca closes the vocal part of the opera and the 
work ends with intensely dramatic music in the orchestra, 

Puccini always had the ability to compose music which 
should most accurately fit the words and the stage 
situation, and never has he displayed this more forcibly 
than in the music of "Tosca." A greater difference than 
exists in the music of "La Boheme," and in that of 
"Tosca" can scarcely be imagined and yet each is exactly 
the kind required for the respective librettos and stage 
situations. In "Tosca" there is little opportunity for the 
grace and tenderness which is so prominent a feature of 
the "Boheme" music. Everything is deadly earnestness 
and tragedy and- the dramatic incidents of the story 
follow each other with such speed and excitement that 
the music often has to take a secondary place to the 
action, this being especially the case in the second act. 
At the same time, there are passages of great lyric beauty' 
in "Tosca," notably the two great arias for tenor and 
the "N'issi d'arte," and by contrast, they are all the more 
effective. In dramatic power, however, the music of 
"Tosca" has rarely been equalled by any composer. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 3« 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Thursday Evening, December 4, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

LA TRAVIATA 

Opera in Four Acts 

Text by Francesco Maria Fiave; adapted from the drama, "La Dame aux Camelias," 

by Alexandre Dumas, Jr. 

(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

VIOLETTA VALER Y CLARE CLAIRBERT 

(First appearance in Philadelphia) 

ALFREDO GERMONT IVAN DNEPROFF 

GIORGIO GERMONT JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

GASTONE DE LETORIERES ALBERT MAHLER 

BARON DOUPHOL ABRAHAM ROBGFSKY 

MARQUIS D'OBIGNY ALFRED DE LONG 

DOCTOR GRENVIL ENRICO GIOVANNI 

FLORA BERVOIX HELEN JEPSON 

ANNINA PACELI DIAMOND 

GIUSEPPE ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Incidental Dances by Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. — Salon in the house of Violetta , 

ACT II. — Room in a country house near Paris ' 

ACT III. — Ballroom in the house of Flora 
ACT IV. — Violetta's bed-chamber 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

E>irector MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOO.SSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYlv ETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts.. Philadelphia 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe is' Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



La Traviata 

By Giuseppe Verdi 



In 18S1, at the age of thirty-eight years, Giuseppe 
\'erdi was considered to be a promising young composer 
of Italian opera, but in no way the equal of his great 
predecessors, Bellini. Donizetti and Rossini. Within two 
years of that time he had established himself firmly as 
the greatest composer of opera that Italy had yet pro- 
duced — a position which he still holds unchallenged. This 
short cut to fame and fortune was by way of three 
operas — "Rigoletto," produced in 1851; "II Trova'.ore," 
first presented in January of 1853, and "La Traviata," 
given for the first time only two months later, in March 
of 18S3. 

The story of "La Traviata" is founded upon Dumas' 
play, "La Dame aux Camelias," better known to the 
English-speaking stage as "Camille," in the title role of 
which many famous actresses have appeared. The orig- 
inal play represented certain phases of the then modern 
l->ench life. Perhaps, remembering certain experiences 
with the touchy \'ic'or Hugo over the libretto of 
"Ernani," Piave made material changes in some of the 
characters, the original Marguerite Gauthier of the 
Dumas story becoming X'ioletta \'alery in the opera and 
Olympis being changed to Flora Bervoix. 

The story of the opera resolves itself into four prin- 
cipal scenes- — the supper at the home of Violetta. where 
she becomes acquainted with Alfredo Germont. both fall- 
ing violently in love at first sight; the rupture occasioned 
by the arrival of Alfredo's father; the ball at the house 
of Flora and, in the last act, the reconciliation and the 
death scene. There is no doubt that the dramatic unity 
of the original play has been sacrificed somewhat in this 
ra'.her sketchy treatment of the story, but it has been 
vastly improved for strictly operatic purposes. 

The first act begins with a gay party at the home 
of Violetta. Alfredo Germont. a youth from Provence, 
meets Violett? and becomes so desperately enamoured of 
her and she of him, that she decides to give up her life 
of reckless pleasure and return his love. The following 
act is located in a country house in the suburbs of Paris, 
where Violetta and her lover are living happily in seclu- 
sion. In order to maintain this establishment, Violetta 
has sold her property in Paris; but, upon finding this out, 
Alfredo refuses to be the recipient of her bounty and 
sets out for the city to recover the property and return 
it to her. While he is gone, his father, discovering the 
whereabouts of the lovers, appears and pleads with 
\'ioletta to give up .\Ifredo. not only for his own sake, 
but also to save an ancient and honorable family from 
disgrace. Profoundly touched by the father's plea, 
Violetta coi^sents to do as he asks and secretly returns 
to Paris, where she resumes her old life. 

The next act is laid in the home of Flora Bervoix, 
where a gay ball is in progress. Alfredo is one of the 
guests and meets Violetta for the first time since she 
secretly left the country house, he not knowing her 
whereabouts in the meantime. He re])roaches her bit- 



terly before the assembled guests and publicly insults her 
by throwing at her feet the miniature which she had 
given him. Violetta, terribly humiliated, returns to her 
home in Paris and is desperately ill with tuberculosis 
when Alfredo learns the truth and the terrible sacrifice 
which she has made for him. He rushes to her side 
to ask forgiveness and she blesses him and dies in his 
arms. 

The music of "La Traviata" is very clifferent from any 
which Verdi had written up to that time and it demon- 
strated his ability not only to create great music, but 
also a versatility possessed by few composers of any 
period, in that he could go, apparently without an effort, 
from the melodrama of "Rigoletto" and "II Trovatore" 
to a drawing-room tragedy like "La Traviata." The 
music of "La 1 Traviata" is far more delicate than any 
which \'erdi h&d composed up to that time and it is also 
more graceful and refined, as the subject and the stage 
situations demand. ]5esides this, there is real pathos in 
many of the arias and scenes, elements which have served 
to keep the opera constantly on the boards since its 
musical and dramatic values were accurately appraised. 

The title role is peculiar in that it is coloratura in the 
first act. but after that becomes almost purely lyric. 
.Vmong the principal vocal numbers are the famous ".\hl 
fors e lui" of the first act, following the lively drinking 
chorus with which the opera opens after the curtain rises; 
the tenor aria for Alfredo, "De' met bollenti," and the 
succeeding duet with \'ioletta in the second act; the 
ballad-like "Di Provenza il mar," sung by the elder Ger- 
mont in the same act; the gay ballroom music and ballet 
of the third act and, in the last, the arias "Addio! del 
passato" and "Ah! gran Dio," and the duet with Alfredo, 
which, in some respects, is strikingly like the duet in 
the last scene of "II Trovatore" between Manrico and 
.\zucena. 

Unlike "Rigoletto" and "II Trovatore," which were im- 
mediate successes upon their initial performances, "La 
Traviata" was a flat failure. Time has proved the truth 
of what N'erdi suggested after the first performance, that 
"the singers were rfiore to blame than the music." Many 
misfortunes hoveved over that first performance in X'enice 
in the spring of 1853. The singers were indifferent, al- 
though they were the best of their day. Graziani, the 
tenor, had a bad cold and, as there was no understudy 
for the role, he sang the part through in a hoarse and 
almost inaudible voice. Varesi, the baritone, sulked over 
what he considered to be a secondary part and took no 
trouble to bring out what the composer had put into the 
role. Finally, Signora Donatelli, who created the role 
of the fragile heroine, was perhaps the stoutest singer 
who ever graced . the Italian operatic stage and when, 
in the last act. Dr. Grenvil announced that Violetta had 
so wasted away with tuberculosis that she had but a very j 
short time to live, the audience stopped the opera with 
shrieks of mirth — a situation by no means appropriate to 
the tragic close of the opera. But Verdi soon had his' 
revenge. "La Traviata" was received with immense ac- 
claim in Italian cities other than Venice, its fame rapidiv 
spread throughout Europe and the operatic world, ami 
the role of \'ioletta has been taken by every operatii 
sopi aiT^i (if importance in the last seventy-five years. 



/\MJtKlL^/\i\l /\K^/\UL^l\ o] MUOiL. rfVc 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Thursday Evening, December 11, 1930, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 



THAIS 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

Text by Louis Gallet, Adapted From the Novel "Thais," by Anatole France 

(In French) 

ATHANAEL, a young Cenobite monk JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

NICIAS, a wealthy Alexandrian IVAN DNEPROFF 

PALEMON. an aged Cenobite monk IVAN STESCHENKO 

THA'iS, an actress MARIANNE GONITCH 

CROBYLE, a slave AGNES DAVIS 

MYRTALE. a slave ROSE BAMPTON 

ALBINE, an abbess JOSEPHINE JIRAK 

A SERVITOR ALFRED DE LONG 

BALLET DIVERTISSEMENT IN ACT II. SCENE 2, BY 

CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premjere Danseuse 

DOROTHY LITTLEFIELD, Assyrian Maiden 

WILLIAM DOLLAR, DOUGLAS COUD7, THOMAS CANNON, Slaves 

Bacchantes, Syrian. Grecian and Rose Maidens by Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR W'lLHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. Scene 1 — A Camp of the Cenobite Monks on the River Nile 

Scene 2 — Terrace of the House of Nicias in Alexandria 

ACT II. Scene 1 — A Room in the House of Thais 

Scene 2 — Square Before the House of Thais 

ACT III. Scene 1 — An Oasis in the Thcban Desert 

Scene 2 — A Garden of the Convent of the White Sisters 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKl 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Ballet Costumes by Van Horn cr' Son, 12th and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William Puniel, New York. 

furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Tcmoyan Company, ,>.i3 5 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. .1. Heppe &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



X 



American acauhmt of MUbi 



v_^ 



?S 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Thais 



By Jules Massenet 



attends richly apparelled. Thais seeks to allure Athanael 
with her charms, but he denounces her and flees from the 
house in horror. 



'"Thais," the opera by which, with the possible excep- 
tion of "Mpnon," Jules Massenet is best known in the 
United States, was the tenth of the twenty-five works of 
the composer and was produced for '.he first time in Paris 
on March 16, 1894. This was the composer's most pro- 
ductive year, no fewer than three dramatic works by him 
being brought out in this period; the others were "Le 
Portrait de Manon," a delicate little sketch in one act, 
and "La Navarraise," in which Massenet, like most com- 
posers of that time, attracted by the sudden rise to fame 
anil fortune of Pietro Mascagni, made an attempt to imi- 
tate the melodramatic extravagance of "Cavalleria 
Rusticana." 

Like "Eselarmonde," Massenet composed "Thais" for 
Sibyl Sanderson, the famous American soprano, who was 
then in Paris and at the height of her brilliant operatic 
career. And, like many of his fellow composers, Massenet 
went to the writings of Anatole France for the story 
which was put into libretto form by Louis Gallet. The 
feeling of the original romance of France is admirably 
carried out in the libretto, which closely follows it. Li 
this work, Massenet again exhibited his peculiar genius 
for selec.ing stories with dramatic and stage possibilities 
and setting them to music which conformed strictly to the 
taste of the Parisian public of his day, these qualities 
already accounting for the tremendous popularity of his 
works during his lifetime. 

The opera is in three acts and the scene is laid in 
Thebes, the capital of ancient upper Egypt and in the 
Theban desert, during the occupation of Egypt by the 
Greeks. The opening scene is in the camp of the Cenobite 
monks along the Nile. The monks are at supper and as 
they eat, Athanael, a young monk, appears and takes 
his place among them. He has been at Alexandria 
(Thebes) to protest against Grecian luxury and profligacy, 
but has returned disheartened by his failure, having found 
the city largely given over to the influence of Thais, a 
young woman of great beauty, who is leading a life of 
the most reckless pleasure. After the monks separate for 
the night, Athanael in a vision, sees Thais before the 
Alexandrian crowds, posing as Venus, and he decides to 
return and convert her to a saintly life. The scene closes 
with his departure for the wicked city. 

The second scene is in the house of Nicias, a rich but 
profligate yoimg Greek nobleman of Alexandria. Athanael 
appears and 1 Nicias tells him that for Thais, he has sold 
all of his possessions and is a ruined man, and he laughs 
at Athanaer.? determination to make her change her mode 
of life. Neivertheless, he invites the monk to the last 
supper whicl^ he is able to give for Thais and .\thanael 



The second act opens in the house of Thais. She is 
looking at herself in a mirror and thoughtfully musing 
upon the days when she shall become old, when Athanael 
appears and exhorts her to go with him, enter a convent 
and repent of her past deeds. She in return, invokt- 
^■enus, burning incense to the goddess and refuses to tn 
.\thanael declares that he will wait until the dawn, and 
Nicias and his friends appear and the revelry begins. The 
next scene is just before daybreak in the square in front 
of the house of Thais. She appears and consents to go 
with the monk to the convent, when Nicias and his frineds 
make their appearance, Nicias declaring that he has won 
at the gaming tables much more than he has spent. They 
refuse to allow Athanael to take Thais away with him, 
but Athanael sets fire to the palace and he and Thais 
escape. 

The third act opens at an oasis in the Theban desert. 
Thais fatigued, lies down to rest while Athanael brings 
water for her. Restored, he gives her into the care of 
the Albine nuns who take her to their convent. The 
final scene is in the Albine convent, where Thais 
lies dying with the White Nuns around her. Athanael 
enters, inquiring for her and the nuns lead him to her. 
As he kneels before her she tells him of her complete con- 
version, and of her impending death, but he is still strongly 
under her spell and seeks to divert her mind to worldly 
things. She points to the sky and expires and Athanael 
falls to the ground with a cry of despair. 

To this dramatic story of the courtesan and the monk 
who exchanged points of view, Massenet has se: some 
exceedingly beautiful music. The best known vocal num- 
ber is probably the exquisite duet in the scene at the 
oasis, in which the composer reached one of his highest 
inspirational points. Ather fine numbers are Athanael's 
aria as he awakens from his vision of Thais, in the first 
act; the love song and incantation from the second act, 
the meditation upon the vanity and the briefness of human 
beauty and life and the closing aria of Thais as she sees ; 
the gates of heaven opening to receive her, in the final 
scene. The instrumental part of the opera is also very 
efl:"ective. The most popular number is the "Meditation" 
for solo violin between the first and the second scenes 
of the second act, 'together with the Oriental music accom- 
panying the .Mexandrian scenes in the house of Nicias j 
and the dance music also of the second act. The "Medi- 
tation" occupies a place among operatic numbers trans-, 
ferred to the concert stage very similar to the "Inter- i 
mezzo" from "Cavalleria Rusticana" and it has probably 
been played by every violinist in the world since the 
I)remiere of the opera. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
Saturday Matinee, December 20, 1930, at 2.15 o'CIock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

HANSEL UND GRETEL 

A Fairy Opera in Three Acts 

Text by Adclheid Humperdinck Wette 

(In German) 

Music bv ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK 

HANSEL ' PACELI DIAMOND 

GRETEL NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

THE WITCH EDWINA EUSTIS 

GERTRUDE SELMA AMANSKY 

THE SANDMAN EDNA CORD AY 

THE DEWMAN IRENE SINGER 

PETER CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

FOLLOWED BY , 

THE BALLET SPECTACLE 

DIE PUPPENFEE 

(The Fairy Doll) 

Music by JOSEF BAYER 

THE TOYMAKER ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

HIS ASSISTANTS I FRANK DAVENPORT 

nis A5S1S 1 AiN 1 s j GEORGE SOUTHERN 

THE POSTMAN REYNOLDS MAZZEI 

A PEASANT MAURICE ROSS 

THE ENGLISH GENTLEMAN BRANTLEY El LIOTT 

HIS WIFE KATHRYN McILHENNEY 

! DORIS WILSON 
CUPIE WOLFF 
MARGARET SHAW 
HARLEQUIN WILLIAM DOLLAR 

TVRniFSP DOT IS (FLORENCE CAMPBELL 

TYROLESE DOLLS | LUCILLE BREMER 

BABY FRENCH DOLL STELLA CLAUSEN 

GOLLYWOG FANYA LEVENE 

SPANISH DOLL ROSALIE MARKOWITZ 

Dr,Dr-uT ATM nni T >: J DOROTHY RENDLEMAN 

PORCELAIN DOLLS j , ,j,cK POTTEIGER 

MARIONETTE DOROTHY LITTLEFIELD 

CAPTAIN OF HUSSARS THOMAS CANNON 

SAILOR DOLL NICOLAI POPOV 

RUSSIAN DOLL HAROLD TAUB 

TROUBADOUR NACE BERNERT 

THE FAIRY PRINCESS DOLL CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

FRINGE CHARMING DOUGLAS COUDY 

(_k>rps de Ballet: Miles. Hoffman. Gray, Becker, Kahl, Jacob, Renninger, Karklinsch, DoUarton, Guerard, Nokel, 

Vossler, Shaw, Gamson, Flynn, lannone, Fowler. — • Soldier, Tyrolese, Spanish, Porcelain and Pierrette Dolls. 

CONDUCTOR HENRI ELKAN 

BALLET DIRECTOR CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Honory Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, IR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master lEANNE RFNARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLHFIELD 

Premiere Danscuse CATHERINE LITTLIiFlELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Hansel und Gretel Cx)stumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Die Puppenfee Costumes by Van Horn &' Son, 12th and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3.t.>5 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller— C. J. Heppe ii Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

Ihe Organ used is the Estey— Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia 



^ AMhKlCAN ACADhMT of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Hansel and Gretel 

By Engelbert Humperdinck 

Humperdinck's fairy opeia "Hansel and Gretel" is 
probably the most conspicuous instance of any stage work 
which later proved to be a great masterpiece but which 
was not originally conceived in operatic form, by either 
the composer or the librettist. The first appearance of 
the work in any form was when Humperdinck's sister, 
the brilliant Frau Adelheid Wette, selected the story 
from one of Crimni's Fairy Tales, and arranged it in 
easy dramatic form for the amusement of her children, 
to give at their home at Christmas time. She asked her 
brother, Englelbert Humperdinck, to write out a few little 
melodies to accompany the performance. 

He did so, but upon closer reading of the text, the 
dramatic possibilities of the story so appealed to him that 
hr determined to rewrite it completely and give it a 
full operatic setting. In this determination, he was sup- 
ported by many of the most influential musicians of 
( Germany among them Richard Wagner, whom Humper- 
dinck had helped with "Parsifal." In his musical treat- 
ment of this simple little story, Humperdinck has ap- 
plied the same musical methods used by Wagner in his 
settings of the great mythological legends of the Teuton 
race. 

The first act opens in the forest home of Peter, the 
broom-maker, where the children, H'ansel and Gretel, have 
been left in the cottage with instructions to knit and 
make brooms, while their parents are searching for food. 
The mother returns empty-handed and finding the chil- 
dren playing, in her anger accidentally upsets the jug 
of milk which is their only hope for supper. She then 
sends the children into the forest, telling them not to 
return until they have filled the basket with berries. The 
father returns with plenty of provisions both solid and 
liquid and a jolly scene ensues, until he misses the chil- 
dren, and he breaks out in a fit of rage and fear when 
told that they have been sent into the forest. To grue- 
some music he tells the wife and mother, about "the 
witch who lives in a ginger-bread house, entices little 
children into it, and bakes them into ginger-bread." 

In the second act, the children are discovered in the 
woods. They are merry at first, but suddenly they 
realize that they are lost. The "Sandman" a "sleep- 
fairy," sprinkles "sand" in their eyes, and they sleep 
after they have said the prayer of the "fourteen angels," 
which German legend declares guard all sleeping children. 

At the opening of the third act, the "Dewman," a 
"dawn-fairy,!' sprinkles dew in their eyes, and they awake. 
They then (discover, and examine the witch's house, 
which has ajhuge oven on one side, and a large cage on 
the other, beth joined to the house of sweets and cakes, 
by a fence of ginger-bread figures. The hungry chil- 



dren break off pieces of the ginger-bread and are nib- 
bling them when the witch appears, and captures them. 
She places Hansel in the cage to fatten, and prepares to 
cook Gretel. While the witch is looking into the oven, 
Gretel releases Hansel, and the children push her into 
it, closing and barring the oven door. But the oven 
suddenly explodes, and a swarm of children released 
from their ginger-bread form, crowd around Hansel and 
Gretel gleefully, as two of the boys drag the Witch from 
the oven in the form of a huge ginger-bread cake. The 
parents then appear, and the opera ends joyously, with 
a chorus of thanksgiving and a general dance. 

In the musical treatment of the opera, Humperdinck 
has followed closely the Wagnerian artistic ideas, and 
and the work is ranked among the finest productions of 
the post-Wagnerian school. Despite the skillful and 
elaborate orchestration and the very original harmonic 
trea'nient, the opera is essentially melodious as are also 
all the songs of the principal characters. The duet of 
the children, the Prayer, and the music accompanying 
the appearance of the fourteen angels, known as the 
"Dream Music," are all very high musical spots and 
skilfully combine great beauty with the simplicity neces- 
sary for sucli a fairy-tale of childhood. 



Die Puppenfee 

(THE FAIRY DOLL) 
Ballet — Music by Josef Bayer 

The scene of this quaint and unique ballet panto- 
mime is laid in a toy shop in Vienna. Each member of 
the ballet appears as a mechanical doll, excepting the 
old shop-keeper, his assistants and his customers. As 
the curtain rises, the shop-keeper is busy arranging his 
dolls and his toys to make them look as attractive as 
possible. Various customers appear, are received cere- 
moniously and shown about the place. A wealthy English- 
man is very exacting in making his purchase and each 
doll in the shop is exhibited, wound up and put through 
its mechanical routine without ineeting with his approval. 
.\t last the shop-keeper shows him the finest and tnost 
wonderful doll of all, the Fairy Doll. For this doll a 
tremendous price is asked but her exhibition is so wonder- 
ful that the Englishman pays it. 

The second scene shows another view of the shop late ' 
at night after the shop-keeper and his helpers have locked 
the doors and gone home. Realizing that she has been 
sold and must say farewell to the other dolls, the Fairy 
Doll comes out of her cabinet, waves her magic wand 
and brings ail the other dolls to life in the real char- 
acters they were made to represent as dolls. They thenj 
hold a carnival of dancing in fairy-land while the rest! 
of the world sleeps. | 



« AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 

I 
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 15, 1931, AT 8 O'CLOCk 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 



LOHENGRIN 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

(In German) j 

Text anJ Music by RICHARD WAGNER ' 

KING HENRY IVAN STESCHENKO 

LOHENGRIN FORREST LAMONT 

ELSA OF BRABANT MARIANNE GQNITCH 

ORTRUD CYRENA VAN GORDON 

TELRAMUND CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

THE KING'S HERALD LEO DE HIERAPOLIS 

/SELMA AM.\NSKY 
I AGNES DAVIS 



PAGES 



j RUTH GORDON 
' HELEN JEPboN 



GOTTFRIED, ELsa's Brother 

Time: First half of the Tenth Century. 



BERNICE DOLLARTON 

PLACE: Antwerp. 



CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. Banks of the River Scheldt, near Antwerp. 
ACT II. Courtyard of the Palace. 
ACT III. Scene 1— Elsa's Bridal Chamber. 
Scene 2 — Same as Act I. 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. KAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director W^ILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Women's Costumes in Act II by Van Horn 6s? Son, Philadelphia. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLanccy Sts., Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe & Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



5< AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY [OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Lohengrin 

By Richard Wagner 

"Lohengrin" was the third opera of Wagner (in order 
of composition), which is still constantly performed, the 
earlier ones being "The Flying Dutchman" and "Tann- 
hauser." "Lohengrin" had its first production at Weimar 
on August 28, 1850, the one hundred and first anni- 
versary of the birth of Goethe and was conducted by 
Franz Liszt. The opera had been composed partly in 
Paris and partly in Switzerland during the bitter years 
of Wagner's exile from Germany in consequence of 
his participation in the Revolution of 1848 and earlier 
political agitations. The story of Lohengrin, the son of 
Parsifal, exists in many forms, the version used by 
Wagner for his libretto being a mixture of the ancient 
Celtic legend of King Arthur, his Knights and the 
Holy Grail and a German legend of a knight who arrives 
in a boat drawn by a swan. The latter tale is supposed 
to have been told by Wolfram von Eschenbach, the 
Minnesinger at one of the Wartburg contests. 

The first act is laid on the banks of the Scheldt near 
Antwerp, where King Henry I of Germany (known as 
King Henry the Fowler) has arrived for the purpose 
of raising troops to help him expel the Hungarians who 
are threatening his dominion. The King finds the 
province of Brabant in a state of great internal unrest. 
Gottfried, the young son of the late Duke of Brabant, 
has mysteriously disappeared; his sister Elsa, being next 
in succession to the dukedom, Telramund, husband 
of Ortrud, who is the daughter of the Prince of Fries- 
land, openly charges Elsa with having murdered her 
brother in order to obtain the dukedom for herself. 
Elsa is summoned by the King to appear before him 
and to submit her cause to battle between Telramund 
and any knight whom she may name. She describes a 
knight whom she has seen in a vision, but whose name 
she does not know, and beseeches him to appear in her 
behalf. The heralds sound a triple summons, and, at 
the close, a strange knight, clad in glistening silver 
armor, is seen approaching on the river in a boat drawn 
by a swan. Before the battle Elsa and Lohengrin (the 
knight) are betrothed, he specifying particularly that 
she must never ask his name nor question him as to 
the place from whence he came. She agrees and the 
ensuing duel results in the defeat and the disgrace of 
Telramund. 

The second act is laid in the square between Elsa's 
palace and the church in which she and Lohengrin are 
to be wedded. Ortrud and Telramund appear before 
daybreak and they discuss their plight and plot revenge. 
Telramund leaves as Elsa appears on her balcony and 
sings of her great happiness. Ortrud calls to her, 
accosts her with affected humility and begs her to 
have Telramund pardoned from the penalty pronounced 
against him by the King. Elsa agrees to this, and, at 
the same time,, Ortrud contrives to instil into her mind 
the first doubts as to Lohengrin and her future happi- 
ness. Ortrud passes into the Kemenate or women's 
palace with Elsa. As day dawns, the nobles assemble 
at the Minster gate and soon the long bridal pro- 
cession from the Kemenate begins. .\s Elsa is about 
to enter the church, Ortrud rushes forward, bars the 
way and claims precedence because of her rank, taunt- 
ing Elsa with ignorance of her lover's name and rank. 
At this moment the King and Lohengrin appear from 



the Pallas (palace of the knights), and the former 
orders Ortrud aside. A moment later Telramund bars 
the way, publicly accusing Lohengrin of sorcery. 
Telramund is also ordered away by the King, who 
personally conducts the bridal couple in'o the church 
where the marriage takes place. 

The third act opens in the bridal chamber with the 
famous Wedding March. Elsa has thought over the 
suspicions planted in her mind by Ortrud and, although 
knowing that it will destroy her happiness, and in open 
violation of her promise, she demands that Lohengrin 
tell her his name and from whence he came. He pleads 
with her in vain, but she grows more and more 
vehement. At this point, Telramund and four armed 
retainers break into the room, but Lohengrin raises 
the sacred sword and Telramund drops lifeless at his 
feet. Lohengrin then gives Elsa into the care of her 
ladies, bidding them take her to King Henry. 

The last act is again laid on the banks of the Scheldt, 
and before the assembled multitude, Lohengrin answers 
Elsa's questions. He is the son of Parsifal, the Lord 
of Monsalvat, Keeper of the Holy Grail. His mission 
is to succour the distressed, but his mystic power vanishes 
if the secret of its origin be known. As he speaks, 
the boat drawn by the swan once more appears and 
Lohengrin bids the heart-broken Elsa a last farewell 
and turns to enter the boat. Ortrud now rushes 
forward and proclaims that the swan is really Gottfried, 
the missing heir to the Brabant dukedom, whom she 
changed into a swan by her magic arts and who would 
have been released except for Elsa's curiosity. Lohengrin 
at once disenchants the swan and Gottfried rushes into 
his sister's arms. The white dove of the Grail wheels 
down from the heavens, takes the place of the swan 
and EJlsa sinks lifeless into her brother's arms as 
Lohengrin departs. 

The opera was written before Wagner had clearly 
formulated even to himself the theories which he was 
to develop to such gigantic proportions in "The Ring'' 
and other later operas. Nevertheless, it marks a great 
advance over his earlier works. It is filled with beauti- 
ful music from the Vorspiel to the closing choral num- 
ber of the last act, and in it all the links which 
formerly connected Wagner with the Italian school of 
opera are broken except one — the concerted finale. The 
set aria has completely disappeared in "Lohengrin" 
and the orchestra takes a far more important position 
than in "Tannhauser." The Vorspiel takes for 
its subject the descent of the Holy Grail, and the Grail 
motif is the keynote of the entire opera. Other especially 
beautiful and famous numbers are Elsa's "Dream," in 
which she relates the story of the vision of the mysteri- 
ous knight who has appeared to her; Lohengrin's fare- 
well to the swan and the prayer of the King, followed 
by the quintet and the chorus, all in the first act. 

In the second act are the love-song of Elsa from 
her balcony, the magnificent music, both orchestral and 
choral, accompanying the procession to the church; in 
the third act, opened by a famous orchestral prelude, 
is the beautiful bridal song of Elsa's ladies, and, in 
the last, the powerful music as Lohengrin reveals his 
identity and the touching farewell to Elsa. In the 
opera Wagner further develops the idea which he began 
in "Tannhauser" of associating a group of instruments 
of the orchestra with a particular character; thus Lohen- 
grin is usually accompanied by the strings and Elsa 
by the wood-wind instruments. The Leitmotif also is 
immeasurably developed over the earlier works of the 
master, paving the way for its greater use in the later 
masterpieces. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5, 1931, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 



PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

RIGOLETTO 

OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

Text by Francesco Maria Piave, adapted from the drama "Le Roi S'Amuse," by Victor Hugo 

(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

THE DUKE OF MANTUA ALEXANDRE KOURGANOFF 

RIGOLETTO, the Court Jester, a Hunchback JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

SPARAFUCILE, an Assassin IVAN STESCHENKO 

COUNT MONTERONE ABRASHA ROfeOFSKY 

BORS A ALBERT MAHLER 

MARULLO CONRAD TH(BAULT 

COUNT CEPRANO ALFRED DE LONG 

AN OFFICER ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

COUNTESS CEPRANO HENRIETTA HORLE 

A PAGE RUTH GORDON 

GIO VANNA, Companion to Gilda •. PACELI DIAMOND 

MADD ALENA, Sister of Sparaf ucile BERTA LEVINA 

GILDA, Daughter of Rigoletto JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

Time— Sixteenth Century Place — Mahtua 

Incidental Dance in Act I by Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSti 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
Act I. — Room in the Duke's Palace 
Act II. — Scene 1. House of Rigoletto 

Scene 2. Room in the Duke's Palace 
Act III.— Sparafucile's House 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI i ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANQELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE PJENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 
Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 
Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 
Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3 335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe is' Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 
The Organ used is the Estey — Estcy Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Rigoletto 

By Giuseppe J erdi 

The opera "Rigoletto," first prodiicefl in N'enict- in 
Marcli of 1851, gave Verdi, already well known in Italy 
as an operatic composer, an international repntalion 
which was enhanced when, in Jannary and March of 
1S3,?, "11 Trovatore" and "l-a Travlata" made llieir 
a|iiiearances, although the latter was, at first, a flat fail- 
ure. When, many years later, there appeared at, roughly, 
intervals of ten years, "Aida," "Otello" and "FalstalTo," 
\erdi became justly known as the greatest operatic com- 
poser Italy had ever produced and one worthy to rank 
wi h any composer of dramatic music in the world. 

The scene of ■■Rigoletto" is laid in .Manf.ia. where 
Rigoletto, the privileged jester and favorite of the licen- 
tious Duke, had long assisted his master in his nefarious 
schemes. Two of these involved the wife of Count 
Ceprano and the daughter of Count Monterone, two of ;he 
courtiers of the i »uke. Monterone appears before the 
Duke and demands satisfaction for the disgrace laid upon 
his name an.l family, but is arrested by orders of the 
Duke and is taunted so insolently by Rigoletto .hat he 
lays upon him a curse which frightens even the callous 
jester. The other courtiers of the Duke are so enraged 
at the impudence and insolence of Rigoletto tha'. they 
(Ktermine to have revenge upon him. This revenge 
takes the form of the abduction of (olda, daughter of the 
jester ami the delivery of her into du- hands of the Duke, 
(dlda has bcii s.i carefully guarded by her father that 
iHine of the lourtiers know that she is Rigoletto's daugh- 
ter, lielieving her to be his unstress. Pretending diat it 
is the wife of Count Ceprano who is to be abducted, 
the courtiers i;et Rigoletto to assist in the sealing of iiis 
own daughtei. this being accomplished by persuailing him 
to allow hiniM-lf to be blintlfolded during the abduction, 
r.ut, closely guarded as Cdlda has been, she has not es- 
capeil die ey of the Duke, wlio lias already made love 
to her in the guise of a poor student, and Cilda has 
fallen desper.itely in love with him. 

Rigoletto has already met Sparafucile. a bravo and 
assassin, who offers for a specified sum to kill anxone 
whom Rigohlto desires slain. When the jester linds 
nut tha'. it i"- bis own cherished daughter whom he has 
assisted to .i;ive over into tlie hands of the Duke, he 
hires Sparafi'i ile to kid his master and deliver the boily 
to him in a >ack. .\ce(ndiiigly the Duke is lured to the 
home of Sparafucile. where he promptly makes violent 
love '.o .Maddelena, the handsome sister of the assassin, 
who returns Ids atfection. .\laddalcna learns of the in- 
tention of Sparafucile to kill the attractive stranger and 
Xr\us to dissuade him. At first he will not lis en. but 
finally, on hi r continued appeals, he agrees that, if an- 
other jicrson shall appear at the door before midnight, at 
which time he has .agreed to delivi'r the boch in he 
sack to Rigoh-lto, he will kill that person and give the 
bodv to the jester as that of tlu- Duke. Soarafucile be- 



liL-ving that the infuriated Rigoletto would not open the 
sack after receiving it. 

In the meantime. Rigoletto has rlisguised Cdlda as a 
lioy. before taking her to Verona. Prior to setting out 
on the jcjurney, he takes her to the lujuse of Sparafucile, 
in order that she may hear for herself how perfidious and 
disloy.al the Duke is. She overhears the disjiute between 
Sparafucile and Maddalena, and for the first time learns 
of the plan to kill the Duke, who is rdready in the 
house, and of ;he only condition whereby he may he 
saved. .Still loving him with all her heart, (iilda si)rlngs 
forward and raps on the door which Sparafucile opens 
ami, as she enters, stabs her fatally. lie then i]laces 
the bod\' in a sack and gives it to Rigoletto as that of 
the Duke. Cdoa. ing over his revenge, Rigtdetto is about 
to cast the sack into the river, when he hears the voice 
of the Duke. Tearing open the sack, he sees by a flash 
of lightning that it is the body of his daughter and knows 
that the curse of Monterone has been terribly fulfilled. 

.\s in the case of his earlier o]iera. "Krnaiii," \'erdi 
had a lot of trouble before "Rigoletto" was performed. 
The composer himself selected Victor Hugo's tragedy, 
"Le roi s'amuse," as the subject of an opera and gave 
the work of preparing the libretto to Piave, who changed 
die original title to "La Maledizione." Kuri.i)e, due to 
the revolution of 1848, was then in a political turmoil 
and the authorities of Italy refused to allow a stage 
representation of a king placed in such situations as 
was Francis I of the original story. Finally, the chief 
of police, himself a lover of art, suggested to com- 
poser and librettist that the King should be changed to 
a mythical Duke of .Mantua and the ti le of the opera 
to "Rigoletto," the jester who took the place of the 
Triboulet of the Hugo tragedy. Verdi acce[)ted .liese 
suggestions and had the opera ready in forty days. 
In most cases where Verdi was obliged to make changes 
in his operas for any reason, the changes were removed 
and the original plan restored after the source of the 
objections had been removed. "Rigoletto," however, 
proved to be an exception and the opera stands today 
just as it was first performed. 

The oi)era abounds in fine musical numbers. ;-onie of 
which .ire the op^'iiing aria of the Duke, "Ouesta o 
quella"; the sonorous curse of Monterone in the short 
first ac ; the duets between Gilda and the Duke, and 
Cilda and Rigoletto, together with the famous coloratura 
aria, "Caro Nome"; the pathetic duet between Gilda and 
Rigoletto and the furious denuncia ion of the Duke by 
his jester in the sec(nid: and the great tenor aria. "La 
donna e mobile," and the famous quartet, "I'.ella figlia 
deir amore" of the thir.l act. Verdi was so fearful lest, 
the melody of "La donna e mobile" leak ou. before the 
first performance that Signor Beaucarde, wdio look, 
the role of the Duke at the premiere of the opera, 
did not see the uvjsic until after the company had as- [ 
senibled in the evening for the p_-rforiiiauce, when ihe | 
orchestral parts were dis ributeil and the tenor ler.rne'l 
the aria. The composer was right, for the next '' 
the melody was being sung throughout tin- entire len.^- 
ami breadth of Italy. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1931, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

Madam a Butterfly 

OPERA IN THREE ACTS 
Founded on the Bo(_)k of John Luther Long and the Drama (jI David Bclasco 

(In Italian) 
Music by GIACOMO PUCCINI 

CIO-CIO-SAN HITZI KOYKE ( first appearance here) 

SUZUKI BERTA LEVINA 

KATE PINKERTON HELEN JEPSON 

B. F. PINKERTON RALPH ERROLLE 

U. S. CONSUL SHARPLESS CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

GORO \LBERT MAHLER 

THE UNCLE-PRIEST IVAN STESCHENKO 

PRINCE YAMADORI BENJAMIN De LOACHE 

IMPERIAL COMMISSIONER BEN lAMIN GROBANI 

OFFICIAL REGISTRAR WALTER VASSAR 

TROUBLE (Cio-Cio'San's Child) EVELYN SMITH 

Time: The Present. Place: Nasasiiki. Japan. 

CONDUCTOR EMIL MLYNARSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES i 
ACT I — The garden of Cio-Cio-San's house. 

ACT II — A room in Cio'Cio-San's house. Night. i 

ACT III — The same. Dawn. ) 



Honorary Musical Direclur LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMET.AL, JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danscusc CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

C^ostumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New YorL 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., PhiLidelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe 6? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Organ used is the Estey — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittcnhouse St., Philadelphia. 



X AMtKlCAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Madania Butterfly 

By Giaconio Puccini 



"M.-iilama llutterlly" was 11r- sixth of the upcras cf 
(liaconio Puccini, and liail ils fust iKTfoiniaiice at 
l-a Scala on February 17, 1'>l)4. uhcn < liiisrpiif I )r Luca. 
now of the Metropolitan Company, of New \'ork, uas 
in the cast in the role of Sharpless. The opera was 
literally hissed of¥ the stage at that presentation, heing 
another of that long list of works which created a very 
unfavorable impression ;it its initial presentation, but later 
to be considered as among the tinest works of the composer. 

The original of what was much later to be the basis 
of the libretto of ".\fadaina Butterfly,"' was a short 
story by John F.uther r,ong, of Philadelphia, and deals 
with a young naval (jfrtcer who contracted a "Ja|iaiKse" 
marriage with a (ieisha girl, which he disregarded at 
his pleasure, but which she considered as binding to the 
end. Pailure was associated with the "Afadama i'.ntterfly" 
story in more than its non-success at the firs; ojieralie 
]ierformance. .\fter tlie ])ublication of the (jriginal in 
sh<n-t story form ;il)out thirty-five years ago, when it 
atlrae ed widc-spreail approval, the story came to the 
attention of I ).ivid Uelaseo. Mr. I'.elasccj liad just 
achieved a Inilli.int failure with I'danehe Hate,-, in a 
pla\ entitled 'Xaughty Anthony," and to retrii-ve this 
.ind eomiilete die theatrical season, he looked .aronnd for 
an<ither ]day for .Miss I'.ates. 

Just al)Out tliis time the story by Mr. Long eame into 
his h.ands, ar.d he at once decided to di-.imati/e it and 
use it as a vehicle for Miss liates. With die co-opcra' icjn 
of .Mr. I^ong this was done within a few weeks, and t'le 
play was given f(jr tin- first time at tin- llerald .S:|n.ire 
Theatre' in New \<,r]< ( ity on .\lareh .i, 19(10, the i.iei 
ilental nuisic id' the pla.\ being eomixised )iy Willi im 
I'urst. The Jilay w.is one of the most i-mphatie oi .\lr. 
P.elasco's many successes .and ran for the remainder ■>{ 
the season to crowded houses. 'I'he following year it 
was t.iken to f.ondon, where it jdaved at the Duk,- of 
York's The.-it- c and wher, the .Xnieriean success was 
.lu])licated. 

.\bout this time, Puecini was looking for .1 story for 
an oiiera to follow "Tosca" and "I. a Hfdieme." He was 
notified l>y the stage man.ager of t'ovent (iirden lliat 
there were dceidi-d possibilities in the id.ay tluii nnuiin.y 
,it the l)uke of N'ork's Theatre. Aeeordin.gl> . I'neiini, 
accompanied liy Ciinlio Kieordi, came from .Milan, and 
after seeing the pl.iy agreed that i: had gri-at opcrit e 
possibilities. Kieordi therefore enga.ged l.uigi Illie.i .iiid 
(iiuseppc rdacosa to make the libretto and Pueeini set 
to work at oiire on the nnisic. 

As has been rel.itiil, it was virtually hissed ipff he 
stage at the f-rst performance at I..1 Se.ila, and tl\e com 
poser, knowing that he had written into the opera some 



of his best music, set abotf revising it. The (udginal 
(jpera was in two acts, the second of which w.is extremely 
long. Puccini, therefore, rewrote much of the second 
part of the work, ilividing the long second act in two, 
m.aking three acts insteail of two, and .adding he tenor 
sol.p of the l.-ist act. This revision took only a few- 
months, and on May 2,Sth of the s.nne year (190-1) it 
w .-IS produced in the opera lionse of l!re.-cia. and scmed 
an emph.atic success. It is now regarded with ' [,a 
llobeme" and "La Tosca" to be the finest wenk of 
the composer, and, in some respects, it rs his most 
characteristic. 

The first foreign performance of "Mad;un;i llnlterfly" 
took place at Covt-nt (larden, I-omlon, the following year, 
ami the .\merican premiere was given in Washington in 
1906, in English, by the Sava.ge Opera Company, with 
the Late Walter 11. kodiwcll eondueting. The lirst |ier- 
formance in Italian in the l^idted .St.'ites was at ihe 
Metropolit;in r)per;i House in Xew ^'ork City, when th;- 
chief roles were assumed by (ieraldine I'.'irrar, I'airieo 
C.'iruso, Louise Iloiuer, .and Antonio .Scotti. .XLies ro 
Puccini was present at tins performance, havin.g been 
especially invited for the occasion. It w.-is n]ion this 
occasion that the suggestion was m;ide to him to w ri e 
an opera upoti ,in American subject, the wcnld premieri.- 
ti> take place at the Metropolitan ()]Hr:i House- of .Xew 
York. In this manner "The- (iirl of llu- C.olden Wes." 
came into existence, Pueeini litiding his sid)jeei when he 
witnesseel P.elaseei's proeluetion of th«- pla\ in Xiw- ^'(i^k. 
Thus llelasco cmitributed Iwei of Puccini's eiper.i stinies. 
The eeimposer w;is .■ilso iiresent at the- pre-nuere- id' this 
opera in December, 1910. in .Xew N'ork. 

.Some of the most inspiied nuisic th;il Pueeini e-ver 
wrote went into ".Madama I'.ulle rliy," .nul the- music 
thron.ghout is in keeping with the tragedy. The com- 
poser has made cousiilerable use of melodious re-citative, 
and there are nnisic.d nnmb.-rs of the deeiies, sailness, 
as well as oilers of great brilliancy. Puec!ni has made 
a little use of Oriental rhythms, anil there is one little 
tune, a few measures of which .'ire ident'c-il with .-i 
jihrase of similar length in .Sir .\rthur .Sullivan's "'The 
.Mikado." P.oth composers evide-nll\ found this lit le 
melody in their researches into Japanese music. 

The great love elnet of the first act is also one of the 
finest numbers Puccini Ins ever written, .inil st-inds wi h 
the duet of "La lioheme" ;is a re-niark.ible expression of 
te-nderness and passieni. .\nodier phrase of great heiuty 
is the music which .accompanies the- first ap|ie.-ir.nice em 
the stage of Madania I'.nt c-rlly .and her friends. Thi.s 
music is Oriental in character, but is not strictly Japanese, . 
either in ineloily ov in harmonization. The fin.-ile to the 
first act, the famous "Linien " ed' the heroine- in the 
seconel, the "flowe-r duet" with .'suzuki in the same act, 
and I'.utterfly's niusie- in the tragic third, ,-ire all places 
where the fires of Puccini's genius as an orieratie coni- 
peiser were biiriiin,g most bri.glv.ly. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 3« 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 5, 1931, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 



FAUST 



Lyric Drama in Four Acts 

Text hy Jules Barbier and Michel Carro 

(In French) 

Music hy CHARLES GOUNOD 

FAUST RALPH ERROLLE 

MEPHISTOPHELES . . .IVAN STESCHENKO 

VALENTIN, Marguerite's broth-r CHIEF CAUFOLICAN 

WAGNER, a student .BENJAMIN GROBANI 

SIEBEL, a youth CHARLOTTE SYMONS 

MARGUERITE CHARLOTTE BOERNER (Debut in America) 

MARTHE, Marguerite's companion PACELI DIAMOND 

Walpurgis Night Dances, Act IV. Scene 2 
CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse 
Dorothy Littlefield. Dorothy Hubbard and Corps de Ballet 
Time — XVI Century. Place — Germany. 

Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

.■\CT I — Scene 1 — The Laboratory of Dr. Faust. 
Scene 2 — The Village Fair. 

ACT II — Marguerite's Garden. 

.•\CT III— The Public Square. 

.ACT IV— Scene 1— The Church. 

Scene 2 — VV'alpurgi.- Night Revels on the Brocken. 
Se^ne .> — The Prison. 



Honorary Musical Dir,.ctor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WTLHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Masti r HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

.Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical (>ostiime (Company. New Yurk. | 

Ballet Costumes by Van Horn cr' Son, Philadelphia. 
Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 
Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3 33 5 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 
The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Reed Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhousc St., Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Faust 

By Charles Gounod 



When Charles Gounod's opera, 'Faust," had its first 
presentation at the Theatre Lyrique in Paris on March 
19, 1859, the members of the audience upon that operatic- 
ally importa.nt occasion were probably not aware that 
they were then listening to the only opera which should 
rival in popularity Verdi's "II Trovatore," written six 
years earlier and the same composer's "Aida" to be first 
produced twelve years later. Such was the case however, 
for these three operas have undoubtedly had greater 
popularity than any other three in the repertoire, not 
even excepting 'Carmen." 

The libretto is based, of course, on the Gretchen inci- 
dent in the first book of Goethe's mighty drama, "Faust." 
The French librettists, Barbier and Carre, knew stage 
"business" thoroughly, .is is shown from the manner in 
which they have constructed this libretto, taking this one 
episode and casting the remainder of the drama aside. 
The result is a thoroughly comprehensible libretto, ad- 
mirably constructed from the stage and musical angle, 
although highly different in atmosphere and suggestion 
from the German original. 

The story of "Faust," insofar as it goes in the operatic 
libretto, follows the original plot closely. Faust is first 
shown as an aged man, but still a student, satia'.ed witli 
human klowledge and weary and disappointed over the 
futility of trying to solve the problems of nature. He 
is contemplatng death by his own hand when he hears 
an Easter hymn sung in the distance by a body of vil- 
lagers. With a quick revulsion of feeling, he calls upon 
the Powers of Darkness, and Mephistopheles suddenly 
appears before him. In exchange for his soul, Mephisto- 
pheles offers hiiu youth, beauty and love and shows him a 
magically conjured picture of Marguerite sitting at her 
spinning-wheel. Faust immediately falls in love, signs the 
contract which the fiend has offered him — the transform.i- 
tion is effected — and together they set out upon their 
travels. 

At a Kermesse in the market-place of a small country 
town, Faust sees Marguerite for the first time. She is 
left by her brother, Valentine, a soldier, who has been 
ordered to the wars, in the care of his friend Siebel, who 
is much in love with Marguerite, and an elderly duenna 
Dame Marthe, who later proves herself to be a careless 
guardian. During a pause in the dances of the Kermesse, 
Faust salutes Marguerite, who is returning from church, 
but she merely bows and continues on her way. 

The next act, generally known as the "Garden Scene," 
contains the finest music of the opera. Siebel enters and 
places a bouquet of flowers for Marguerite, on a bench, 
but Faust and Mephistopheles appear; the latter tosses 
Siebel's bouquet cmiti-mptously to the ground and sub- 
stitutes for it a casket (jf jewels. As they leave, .\tarK\ir 
rite enters and, seeing the box, opens it and linds tlu' 
jewels. Faust and his evil genius again appear and the 
former woos Marguerite passionately, while Mephistopheles 
keeps Dame Marthe out of the way by pretending to 



make love to her. The act closes with Marguerite yield 
ing to the entreaties of Faust. As he rushes to the win- 
dow at which she has appeared, she throws herself eagerly 
into his arms and Mephistopheles laughs at the success 
nf his plans. 

In the following act. Marguerite is in the deepest dis- 
tress. Faust has gone his way and \alentine returns 
from the wars to find his sister and her unfortunate love 
affair the mock of the village. Mephistopheles sings a 
sardonic serenade undrr the window of Marguerite, in 
which he scoffingly asks where is her wedding ring. 
Valentine rushes from the house, strikes the guitar from 
the hand of Mephistopheles with his sword and fights a 
duel with Faust. Through the intervention of Mephisto- 
pheles, Valentine is slain in the fight and he dies, after 
cursing Marguerite with his last breath. In the last act 
occurs the so-called church scene, which is sometimes 
omitted in performance, sometimes sung before the death 
of N'alentine and sometimes after it. In this scene Margue- 
rite is kneeling in the shadowy church, trying to pray, 
but the voice of conscience stifles her half-formed words. 
In the libretto of the opera, the .self-reproaches of .Margue- 
rite are materialized in the form of Mephistopheles, who 
n-inains in the background always altliuuKh p.irtly visibU 
to the audience. 

The closing act is usually given in one scene, but the 
original score contained five, including the Walpurgisj 
Night, which is being given at this performance for only 
the second time in many years in Philadelphia. After the I 
brilliant dance scene in the Brocken, the scene shifts to 
the prison where Marguerite, whose troubles have driven! 
Iicr insane, lies condemned to death for the murder of 
her child. Mephistopheles appears, accompanied by Faust | 
and the two endeavor to persuade Marguerite to flee with 
them. Crazed and wandering as she is, she refuses and 
expires to the chant of an angelic choir, telling of her 
forgiveness as Mephistopheles claims the fulfillment of 
the contract and drags Faust down to eternal punishment. 

The opera may be said lo have iiiauiiiiratL-d a new 
era in French dramatic music, for, while Gounod at- 
tempted to break no new ground with regard to struc- 
tural form, the atmosphere, and aim of the oi)era, as well 
as many of the details of its construction are in marked 
contrast to the conventional Italian opera of its day. The 
finest music occurs in the ''Garden Scene," and it creates 
a:i atmosphere of dreamy langour by the combined beauty 
of melody, harmony and orchestration which was in 1859, 
something entirely new to opera of any country and 
played no little part in the development of the modern 
school of operatic composition. Aside from this, some of 
the musical high lights of the opera are the life and gaiety 
of the Kermesse music of the second scene of the first 
act, in which also occurs the graceful and beautiful salu- 
tation of Marguerite by Faust and also the grim drink- 
ing song of Mephistopheles, "The Calf of Gohl"; the 
'Flower Song" of Siebel at the opening of the second 
act: the ironic serenade by . Mephistopheles and Valen- 
tine's "Avant de quitter de ces lieux" in the third act, 
and the rarely heard music of the Brocken scene, in the 
last act. 



C AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 12, 1931, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Genend MatMg«r 

L'HEURE ESPAGNOLE 

Comedy in One Act 

Book by FRANC NOHAIN 
(In French) 

Music by MAURICE RAVEL 

CONCEPCION, Wife of Torquemada CHARLOTTE BOERNER 

GON2ALVE, a Young Gallant RALPH ERROLLE 

TORQUEMADA, a Clock-maker ALBERT MAHLER 

RAMIRO, a Muleteer CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

DON INIGO GOMEZ, a Banker ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

The scene is laid in a clock-maker's shop in Toledo, Spain, during the eighteenth century. 

TO BE FOLLOWED BY 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA 

Tragedy in One Act 

Book by GIOVANNI TARGIONI-TOGGETTI — Adapted from a Story by GIOVANNI VEROA 

(In Italian) 

Music by PIETRO MASCAGNI 

TURIDDU, a Young Soldier DIMITRI ONOFREI 

ALFIO, the Village Teamster GIUSEPPE MARTINO-ROSSI 

LOLA, His Wife GENIA WILKOMIRSKA 

MAMMA LUCIA, Turiddu's Mother ROSE BAMPTON 

SANTU2ZA, a Village Girl BIANCA SAROYA 

The scene is laid in a village in Sicily, on Easter Day, at the present time. 

Conductor Eugene Goossens 

Stage Director Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 

Honorary Musical Director ' LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLVNA.RSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punjel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3 3 35 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe 6? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Mirtuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



L'Heure Espagnole 

By MAURICE RAVEL 

Ravel's opera, "L'Heure Espagnole," was given in 
operatic form at the Opera Comique in Paris on May 9, 
1911. It was originally written as a one-act comedy by 
Franc-Nohain and was thus produced, without music, as 
early as 1904. The libretto offered the composer another 
opportunity to display his ability for securing local color 
in his music, and especially the color of Spain, which 
had always strongly attracted him. 

There may be room for a difference of opinion regarding 
the delicacy of the story of "L'Heure Espagnole," but 
there can be none regarding the humor of the music or 
the skill with which the composer has translated the story 
into tone. In his treatment. Ravel reverted to the idiom 
of the old opera-bouffe. The recitative follows the slight- 
est inflections of the speaking voice, while the orchestra, 
of which Ravel is perhaps the greatest master of the last 
fifty years, in his especial manner emphasizes the mean- 
ing of the words in an irresistibly comic way. 

The scene is in the shop of a Spanish clock-maker 
Torquemada. He is at work when Ramiro, a government 
muleteer enters to have his watch repaired. Concepcion, 
wife of the clock-maker, sends her husband to wind the 
municipal clocks, this being part of his work. The clock- 
maker departs, telling Ramiro to await his return, when 
he will finish repairing the watch. This annoys Concepcion, 
who had counted on her husband's absence to entertain 
her admirer, Gonzalve. To get rid of Ramiro temporarily, 
she asks him to carry a huge clock to her bedroom on the 
second floor. He does so and Gonzalve enters. Concep- 
cion greets him rapturously, but Gonzalve, a poet, is busy 
thinking up ideas for new verses. Ramiro returns, saying 
he has put the clock in place and to get rid of him again, 
Concepcion says she has indicated the wrong clock and 
asks him to bring down the first one and take up the 
other. Ramiro consents and as he leaves, she bids Gon- 
zalve get into the remaining clock and be carried up stairs 
in it. He does so, but scarcely is he concealed, when Don 
Inigo, another admirer, appears. He tries to make love 
to her, not knowing that Gonzalve is concealed in the 
clock almost beside them, but Concepcion repulses him. 
Ramiro enters with the first clock and easily carries up 
the one with Cionzalve hidden in it, Concepcion insisting 
upon accompanying them. While they are gone, Don 
Inigo thinks to play a prank upon Concepcion by hiding in 
the remaining clock. He squeezes himself into it with 
difficulty and when Concepcion returns, imitates a cuckoo, 
greatly to her anger. 

Ramiro now returns with the clock containing Gonzalve, 
but Concepcion is now disgusted with both her admirers 
and turns to Ramiro with whom she runs up the stairs 
"without the clocks" as she tells him on his asking what 
clock he shall move next. With both men inside the 
clocks, Torquemada returns and finds them. They tell 
him that they intend to buy the clocks and have been 
examining tliem inside before purchasing. Don Inigo can- 
not get out of his clock and Torquemada and Gonzalve 
are unable to release him. Ramiro and Concepcion now 
return and Ramiro pulls Don Inigo out with the greatest 
ease. The opera closes with a short epilogue in which 
each of the chaiacters addresses the audience. 



Cavalleria Rusticana 

By PIETRO MASCAGM 

The music of "Cavalleria Rusticana" was composed 
shortly before 1890 and when in that year the publishing 
house of Sonzogno offered a prize for an opera in one act, 
Mascagni submitted his work; it was not written especially 
for the competition as is generally believed. "Cavalleria" 
won easily and produced a sensation when given for the 
first time in the Costanzi Theatre in Rome on May 17, 
1890. Since that time it has been constantly in the 
repertoire of every great opera company in the world. Like 
many another operatic masterpiece, the American premiere 
was in Philadelphia, September 9, 1891. 

The imtnense enthusiasm with which the opera was re- 
ceived produced what has been called "an acute attack of 
Mascagnitis," and the general characteristics of the work, 
then an entirely new thing in operatic music, were imi- 
tated by composers in all the Latin countries. Its mvtsic 
has been severely condemned by some eminent European 
critics, although the directness and strength of the libretto 
were everywhere admitted. In few operas are the music 
and text so closely allied, in spite of all condemnation, the 
opera is still one of the most popular in the repertoire and 
bids fair to remain there indefinitely. 

The story is from a Sicilian tale by Verga and is pecu- 
liarly Italian, being a swift-moving drama of love, flirta- 
tion, jealousy and death. The plot is very simple, but 
equally powerful and the scene is laid in a Sicilian village 
on Easter Sunday morning. Turiddu, a young Sicilian 
peasant, arrived home from service, in the army, has found 
that his former sweetheart, Lola, has married Alfio, a 
carter, in his absence. He consoles himself with Santuzza, 
who returns his love with true Sicilian ardor. Turiddu, 
however, soon tires of her and begins a flirtation with 
Lola who, inspired both by natural coquetry a:id jealousy 
of Santuzza, again looks upon him with favor. Santuzza, 
seeking to retain the affection of Turiddu, is violently 
repulsed and in hot anger, tells the story of the love affair 
of Lola and Turiddu, to Alfio, Lola's husband. Alfio chal- 
lenges Turiddu to a duel and kills him. 

"Cavalleria Rusticana" is filled with melodies which 
have become world-famous in the forty years of the 
opera's existence. The opening song of Turiddu, sung 
off-stage, the whip-so:ig, "II cavallo scalpita" of Alfio, 
sung upon his entrance and the great choral hymn before 
the doors of the church, blending with the "Regina coeli" 
sung by the choir inside, are among the best numbers of 
the early part of the opera. Following these are Santuzza's 
romanza, "Voi lo sapete," the entrance song of Lola, the 
impassioned duet between Santuzza and Turiddu, the 
story told by the former to Alfio and his promise to 
avenge her. At the close of this, Santuzza and Alfio run 
off the stage and then, in strong contrast to the surge of 
passionate human feeling, which has dominated the opera 
to this point, comes the calm, almost religious intermezzo 
for orchestra alone, played with the stage empty. Few 
operatic instrumental compositions have had the vogue of 
this charming number and even fewer have retained that 
vogue for so long. At its close the turmoil is resumed. 
The people come from the church, singing a joyous song, 
which is followed by a drinking-song by Turiddu and the 
chorus. Alfio, invited to drink with them, contemptuously 
refuses and the quarrel starts, ending in the challenge am 
death of Turiddu. 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 19, 1931, AT 8.10 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

WOZ2ECK 

From the Drama by GEORG BUCHNER 

(In German) 

The Music by ALBAN BERG 

First Presentation in America with the following 

CAST 

MARIE ANNE ROSELLE 

WOZZECK IVAN IVANTZOFF 

THE CAPTAIN BRUNO KORELL 

THE DOCTOR IVAN STESCHENKO 

ANDRES SERGEI RADAMSKY 

THE DRUM-MAJOR GABRIEL LEONOFF 

FIRST ARTISAN ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

SECOND ARTISAN BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

THE IDIOT ALBERT MAHLER 

A SOLDIER LOUIS PURDEY 

MARGRET EDWINA EUSTIS 

MARIE'S CHILD DORIS WILSON 

Soldiers — Artisans — Youths — Girls — Children j] 

CONDUCTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR AND CHORUS MASTER HENRI ELKAN 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

The orchestra comprises the entire personnel of one hundred and sixteen members of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra; the stage band of twentyfive is composed 

of musicians selected from The Curtis Symphony Orchestra ! 

( 

Scenery and Costumes Designed by ;t 

ROBERT EDMOND JONES 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios 
Costumes by Van Horn &? Son 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I 
Scene 1--The Captain's Room 
Scene 2 — Open Country 
Scene 3 — Marie's Room 
Scene 4 — The Doctor's Study 
Scene 5- — A Street in Front of Marie's House 

ACT II 

Scene 1 — Marie's Room 

Scene 2 — A Street in the City 

Scene 3 — A Street in Front of Marie's House 

Scene 4 — An Inn Garden 

Scene 5 — The Guard-room of the Barracks 

ACT III 

Scene 1 — Marie's Room 

Scene 2 — A Wood-path Near a Pond 

Scene 3 — A Tavern 

Scene 4 — A Wood-path Near a Pond 

Scene 5 — A Street in Front of Marie's House 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

As there will be no pauses in the music by the orchestra during changes of scene, it 
is earnestly requested that there be no applause during the orchestral interludes. 
There will be short intermissions between the acts. 

In order to preserve intact the visual and aural impression of Wozzeck as an art- 
work, there will be no curtain calls after the performance. i 



SYNOPSIS OF THE STORY OF 

WOZZECK 



WOZZECK, by Alban Berg, is set to the drama by Georg Biichner, the manuscript of 
which ^vas lost for nearly forty years after the writer's death in 1837. The story is a curious 
mingling of fantastic imaginings, stark realism, intense tenderness and murderous brutality. 

WOZZECK takes its title from the name of one of the principal characters, a wretched 
private soldier, who is the subject of everyone's abuse: ignorant, superstitious and filled with fear 
of the supernatural. 

He is the victim of a rascally military DOCTOR, who uses him as the subject of all sorts 
of crazy medical experiments, to which WOZZECK submits for the few pennies it adds to his 
pay, all of which he gives to MARIE, his mistress, and the mother of his child. 

MARIE is unfaithful to WOZZECK. succumbing to the charms of the DRUM-MAJOR. 
v,'ho lures her from WOZZECK by his gorgeous uniforms and splendid physique. WOZZECK 
is first apprised of MARIE'S defection by the CAPTAIN and afterwards by the DRUM- 
MAJOR himself, who boasts of his conquest. 

My\RIE, stricken by remorse for her wickedness, reads from her Bible the story of the 
repentant Magdalen and tells her little one a story of an imaginary child that had lost both 
parents, in one of the most effective scenes in the opera. 

WOZZECK induces MARIE to walk with him in the woods; his words and demeanor alarm 
her and she attempts to escape. He stabs her and as MARIE dies, he staggers off. 

WOZZECK seeks momentary relief in drink. He meets MARGRET, a friend of MARIE, 
in a tavern. She sees blood on his hands and becomes terrified; a crowd gathers and WOZZECK 
flees. 

Wl_)ZZECK returns to the woods to hunt for the knife: he finds it and flings it into a 
pond. Thinking it may have fallen too close to the shore, he wades into the water and while 
searchin.j for the knife, drowns. 

MARIE'S little boy is riding his hobby-horse in front of his mother's house: children are 
playing about and shouting; one of them rushes up and tells the child the news of his mother's 
tragic end. He seems not to grasp the significance of what has happened, but still playing, as 
the children rush away in morbid curiosity toward the pond, he gazes after them for awhile and 
then follows them on his hobby horse, as the opera ends. 



A detailed synopsis of WOZZECK and a complete English translation of the original 
German '.ext, prepared by Alfred Reginald Allen, are included in a Souvenir Programme which 
is on sale in the Lobby: these Souvenir Programmes may also be procured at the office of the 
Philadelohia Grand Opera Company, 818 Harrison Building. S. W. Corner 15th and Market" 
Streets; Heppe's (George T. Haly). 1119 Chestnut Street: Elkan-Vogel Company. 1716 Sansom 
Street; Theodore Presser Company, 1712 Chestnut Street and Wanamaker's Music Department. 



6 AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 i 

1 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 26, 1931, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER General Matiager 

LES PECHEURS DE PERLES 

Opera in Three Acts 

Text by MICHEL CARRE and P. E. PIESTRE ("Cormon") 

(IN FRENCH) 

MUSIC by GEORGES BIZET 

LEILA, a young Brahman priestess JOSEPHINE LUCCHE|SE 

ZURGA, chief of the pearl fishers JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

NADIR, a Singhalese friend of Zurga RALPH ERROLLE 

NOURABAD. a Brahman high priest IVAN STESCHENKO 

Incidental Dances by Corps de Ballet 
The scene is laid in Ceylon, in barbaric times * 



Conductor Eugene Goossens 

Stage Director Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. A village on the seashore 
ACT II. The ruins of a temple 
ACT III. Scene 1 — The Camp of Zurga 
Scene 2 — A forest 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKQWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELK AN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEM AREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danscuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery designed and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, PhiLidclphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLanccy Sts., Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3J35 Walnut Street Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe &? Son, Agents, 1119 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia 



'A 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Les Fecheurs de Perles 

By Georges Bizet 

■'Les Peel ems de Perles" (The Pearl Fishers) was 
produced for the first time anywhere at the Theatre 
Lyri(iue in Paris on September 29, 18(i3. The first 
American performance was not given until nearly thir.y 
years later, Philadelphia again being tlie brst city to 
liear it on August 25, 1893. The libretto was i)reiiared 
for P)izet b\ t'arre and Piestre ("Cormon"), and it is 
unknown whether it was taken from a story or whe her 
it was originally planned as an ojiera. 

The story is laid in Ceylon in barbaric times and the 
o|K-ning scere shows a beach on the Singhalese coast. 
Zurga, a leader among the iiearl fishers, says that it is 
time for tht selection of a chief'.ain and they unani- 
mously chofse him. He accepts, provided they will 
swear absolute obedience to him, to which all agree. 
At this poin Nadir, who has long been away, and who 
was a close friend of Zurga in their boyhojd days, 
appears and, after telling the story of his adventures, 
is invi ed by Zurga and the others to join their colony. 
He accepts, and, after more dancing, the fishers with- 
draw, leavini,' the two friends alone. 

They recall a day now long past, when visiting a 
ISrahman ten pie, they saw a beautiful woman pass through 
the worshippers, leaving both men deeply in love with 
her. This Teeling was so strong that they (|uarrelled 
and parted n anger, not to be re-united in friendship 
until the present time. At this point in the opera occurs 
the famous duet "Au fond du temple." Zurga sees a 
boat approacliing and explains to Nadir that once each 
year, a veiled priestess comes to the island and prays for 
the prosperity of the pearl fishers and that none may 
approach or address her. Leila, the Priestess, leaves the 
boat, followed by Nourabad, the High Priest. Zurga, 
as Chieftain, demands if she will continue true to her 
oath to rem?in veiled and have neither friend, lover nor 
kusband, death being the penalty for the breaking of these 
vows. At that moment, the Priestess recognizes Nadir, 
and Zurga, seeing her perturbation, advises her lo re- 
nounce her service and leave the island while there is 
yet time, but she refuses. The others depart, leaving 
Nadir alone, and he is confident now that the Priestess 
and the girl he saw in the temple are one and the same. 
Leila, atlended by Nourabad, appears on the rock and 
the sacrificial fires are lighted as she sings an invocation 
for the pearl fishers. Nadir clearly recognizes her as 
she lifts her veil for a moment. 

The second act is laid in llu- ruins of a templr. at 
night. Nourabad a]ipro:iches the Priestess and tells her 
that her fast is ilone anil she may sleep. She is safe, 
he tells her, for the rock is inaccessible by sea and on 
the land side the priests guard her, weapons in hand. 
.She tells the High Priest of a time when she had rescued 
a fugitive f r nii ;i pursuing mob (it la'er proves to have 
been Zurga) an 1 he gave her a chain in memory. The 
High Priest Icax ( s and she rejoices that Nadir is near. 



.Soon his voice is heard and he joins her. A long love 
scene follows and finally the Priestess is reminded tluit 
discovery will mean death for both of them. A storm 
gathers and, as it breaks, Nourabad rushes in, discovers 
the lovers and calls the guards who seize- boh Leila and 
Nadir. The fishers demand the death of both, but Zurga 
appears and declares that their fate is in his hands, as 
Chieftain. He grants the lovers liberty, which the fishers 
sanction hut, as they are about to leave, Nourabad lifts 
the veil of the Priestess and Zurga sees before him the 
girl of the l!r;ihnian teuiple of many years before. Filled' 
with anger, lu- orders the death of both. 

In the third act, Zurga is alone in hi.s tent and re- 
proaches himself that he has condemned to death Nadir, 
the friend of his youth. Leila appears before him and 
begs mercy for Nadir, assuming all the guilt herself. 
He asks her if she loves Nadir aiul, when she will not 
reply, his wra.h revives. At this point Nourabad enters 
and says that the hour for punishment has come and 
the fishers await the death of the traitors. Leila gives 
a necklace to a young fisherman to be sent to her mother 
after her death, but Zurga, recognizing it, tears it from 
the youth's hands and rushes out. The final scene shows 
a funeral pyre ready for the condemned pair, who enter, 
surrounded by the priests. .\ red light is seen in the 
distance and Zurga runs in with a torch in his hand just 
as the Priestess is about to step on the pyre. He ex- 
plains that a fire from heaven has descended upon their 
homes and all rush away except Nourabad, who con- 
ceals himself to hear what Zurga will say to Leila and 
Nadir. Zurga tells them that he himself set the fire. He 
releases Leila from her bonds, telling her that, as she 
once saved him, he now repays the debt and urges that 
she and Nadir escape while there is still time. As they 
leave, Nourabad, who has run off to warn the fishers, re- 
turns with them and i)oints out Zurga as the traitor 
who has destroyed their homes and permitted the con- 
demned pair to escape. One of the fishers stabs Zurga 
who falls to the earth as the people pray to Brahma. 

"Les Pecheurs de Perles" was Bizet's first opera and 
naturally, there is not to be expected in it the char- 
acteristics of "Carmen" to be composed more than a 
decade later. And yet, there are in the music, some- 
remarkable forecastings of the later Bizet. He had not 
yet freed himself from the overpowering influence of the 
Italian opera of that date (186.^) and the work as a 
whole follows the traditional model in form as well as in 
the brilliant bravura in more than one number for Leila. 
On the other hand, here is much that showed that evtti 
then, ISizet was tending strongly towards loc.il color in 
his music, which he was to achieve fully in "Carmen." 
The score of "Les Pecheurs de Perles" owes somvthing 
to Felicien David's opera "Lalla Rookh" ;ind even more 
to his symphonic poem "Le Desert" and there are m:iny 
places in it which foreshadow the power and variety of 
"C"armen." It was Felicien David who first opened the 
eyes of I'-rench composers to the possibilities of Oriental 
color, and "Le Desert" was th£ virtual progenitor of 
Bizet's "Les Pecheurs de Perles" and "Djamileh" as 
well as Massenet's "Le roi de Ltdiore" ami Delibcs' 
"Lakme." 



AMtKlCAN AUAUbMY of MUiJIC X 



GRAND OPERA 



SEASON 1930-1931 



THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 9, 1931, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 



PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 



WILLIAM C. HAMMER General Manager 

CARMEN 



Opera in Four Acts 
Text by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halevy, adapted from the novel by Prosper Merimee 

(In French) 

, Music by GEORGES BIZET 

DON JOSE, a corporal of dragoons RALPH ERROLLE 

ESCAMILLO, a toreador JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

DANCAIRE / ) BENJAMIN GROBANI 

REMENDADO ] ^'""ggle'''^ ( ALBERT MAHLER 

ZUNIGA, a captain of dragoons IVAN STESCHENKO 

MORALES, a dragoon CONRAD THIBAULT 

MICAELA, a peasant girl CHARLOTTE SYMONS 

frasquita; . \ helen jepson 

MERCEDES \ ^>'P''^^' ^"^"^« °^ C^'^'"'"^" / ROSE BAMPTON 

CARMEN, a Gypsy cigarette girl INA BOURSKAYA 

(Courtesy of Metropolitan Opera Company) 
The scene is in and near Seville, Spain, in 1820 
Dance in Act II — Catherine Littlefield and Dorothy Littlefield 
Divertissements in Act IV — 1. Dorothy Littlefield and Thomas Cannon 

2. Catherine Littlefield, Douglas Coudy and William Dollar 

3. Entire Corps De Ballet 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. — P'ubhc Square in Seville 
ACT II.— The Inn of Lillas Pastia 
ACT III.— A Mountain Pass 
ACT IV— Before the Bull Ring in Seville 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKl 

^"■efor MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYN ARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELK AN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager . V.'.'.'. ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESS ANDRO ANGHLUCCI 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

L'branan CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punzel, Nevir York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Sts., Philadelphia 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 333 5 Walnut Street Philadelphia 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller— C. J. Heppe &> Son, Agents, N. W. Cor. 6th 6? Thompson 

Ihe Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette"— Estey Organ Studios. 1706 Rittenhouse St., Phila 



Sts., Phila. 
dclphia. 

i 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L, Laciar 



Carmen 

By Georges Bizet 



Georges Bizet's "Carmen," today one of the most 
popular operas in the world, dividing this distinction 
with Verdi's "II Trovatore" and "Aida" and Guonod's 
"Faust," was first produced at the Opera Comique in 
Paris on March 3, 1875. Like many another work 
later acclaimed as a great masterpiece, it proved, on 
its first performance, to be a flat failure. The unfor- 
tunate composer, familiar as he was with having his 
operas fail, took this so greatly to heart that he died 
three month;; later, to a day, without ever having heard 
his greatest work. The brilliantly successful career 
of "Carmen " began three years after the death of 
Bizet and has been steadily maintained ever since. 

The libretto of "Carmen" was adapted from the 
romance of the same name by Prosper Merimee, by the 
librettists Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halevy, the latter 
a lirother-in-law of Bizet and a son of Jacques Francois 
Halevy, composer of "La Juive." The scene of "Car- 
men" is laid in and near Seville, Spain, the time being 
1820. The frst act is in the square of Seville, where 
Micaela, the village sweetheart of Don Jose, a young 
Spanish soldier, appears, looking for him. The officer 
in command of the guard tells her that Don Jose will 
arrive soon, with the changing of the guard, but she 
will not wa;t. Almost immediately the new guard ar- 
rives with Don Jose in command, preceded by a crowd 
of street urchins imitating the soldiers, and the old 
guard leaves. 

From a lirge cigarette factory on one side of the 
square, a bell rings and the girls employed there troop 
out. Carme 1 appears alone at the last and is imme- 
diately surrounded by the young men. Don Jose raises 
his eyes, looks at her quietly and continues his work 
in a little chain, the soldiers having been dismissed. 
Carmen looks at them all and then sings the Habanera, 
one of the most famous melodies in the opera. She 
walks up to Don Jose and throws at him a flower which 
she is wearing, then running into the factory. He is 
visibly impr-ssed, but Micaela enters and a scene with 
a beautiful duet follows between her and Jose. Sounds 
of strife an heard within the factory and Don Jose, 
investigating, finds that Carmen has injured another 
sirl in a fight. He ties her arms, but singing the 
Scguidilla, she uses her charms to persuade him to loose 
the bonds, which he finally does. An officer comes 
to convey Cirmen to prison, but she pushes Don Jose 
violently aside, throwing him to the ground, and makes 
her escape across the bridge. 

The second act is laid in the tavern of Lillas-Pastia, 
on the outskirts of Seville. Frasquita, Mercedes and 
Morales are with Carmen and the scene is one of un- 
restrained gaiety. Escaxnillo, the bull-fighter of Gran- 
ada, makes his appearance, singing the "Toreador 
Song," and immediately falls in love with Carmen, 
who is greatly impressed. Finally all leave except 
Carmen and the two girls; Remendado and Dancaire, 
two smugglers, enter and the quintet, the finest en- 
semble number tif the opera follows. Don Jose's voice 



is now hear<l in the distance. He has l)een inqirisoned 
for a mcjnth for allowing Carmen to escape, l)Ut 
now free, has fol lowed her. The smugglers and the 
girls withdraw and a fine scene between Carmen and 
Jose follows. She sings and dances for him, but as 
she does so, a trumpet call is heard and Don Jose 
declares he must return to duty. She is angry that he 
should place duty above his love for her and a violent 
scene ensues. Jose sings to her the "Flower Song"' 
(La fleur que tu m'avais j'etee"), which she accepts 
as a mark of his repentance. They are about to leave 
together when Zuniga, Don Jose's superior officer, enters 
and orders him to return to the barracks. Jose refuses 
and both draw their swords, when Carmen, rushing 
between them, calls the smugglers, who disarm Zuniga, 
making him their prisoner. Carmen and Jose then 
leave with the smugglers, joining their band. 

Act III is in a rocky mountain pass, the camp of the 
smugglers. Frasquita and Mercedes are playing cards, 
wlien Caruien takes a pack of cards and tells her own 
fortune, finally laying down one card which foretells 
lier early and violent death. The smugglers all leave 
with Carmen and Jose and a moiuitaineer appears, guid- 
ing Micaela to Don Jose. She sings the beautiful 
cavatina, "Je dis que rien ne m'epouvante" and, not 
linding Jose, leaves to seek him. A shot is heard and" 
Escamillo and Jose appear. They draw their knives. 
to fight, but are stopped by Carmen and the smugglers. 
who have returned. Escamillo invites them all to the 
l)ull-fight at Seville and then leaves. Micaela reappears, 
telling Jose that his mother is dying and wishes to see 
liim once again. He hesitates because of Carmen and 
Escamillo, but finally goes with her; the smugglers 
take up their bales of goods and the curtain falls. 

The last act is in Seville, just outside the bull-ring 
on the day of the fight. After the ballet, the people 
retire into the arena and Frasquita and Mercedes warn 
Carmen that Jose, poor, hunted for his desertion front 
the army, and desperate, is seeking to kill her. She 
declares that she fears no man and urges her friends to 
enter the arena. At that niumeiU i^ou Josj appears 
and begs her to return to him. She scorns him, saying 
she loves Escamillo and will die for him if necessary. 
As shouts are heard from the Arena, Jose rushes al 
her and stabs her to death as the crowds emerge. 

"Carmen" is a remarkable opera in many respects, 
liut in none more than that, while the music is as 
Spanish in character as can be imagined, yet there is 
not a single authenticated national Spanish melody in 
it from beginning to end, although Bizet has made 
free use of certain Spanish rhythms. There has always 
been rtiuch difference of opinion as to the interpretation 
of the leading character and, as Bizet never heard his 
own opera and never gave any hint of what he had 
in mind, this has thus been necessarily left to indi- 
vidual Carmens. The creator of the role, Mme. Galli- 
Marie, made the part sensual and emphasized the 
animalism of the character, and this was followed by 
Paviline Lucca, and Mile. Belincioni. These character- 
istics were modified greatly by Marie Roze, Minnie 
Hauck, Adelina Patti, Zelie de Lussan and others 
The greatest of all Carmens, Emma Calve, adopted a 
half-way course, but tending rather toward the original 
interpretation of Galli-Marie. 



AMtRIUAN ACAUEMT of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1930-1931 



THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 16, 1931, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER General Manager 

TANNHAUSER 

OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

(In German) 

Text and Music by RICHARD WAGNER 

HERMANN, Landgrave of Thuringia IVAN STESCHENKO 

TANNHAUSER 

WOLFRAM VON ESCHENBACH 

WALTHER VON der VOGELWEIDE. 

BITEROLF 

HEINRICH DER SCHREIBER 

REINMAR VON ZWETER 



. . .Minstrel Knights 



FOUR NOBLE PAGES 



BRUNO KORELL 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
ALBERT MAHLER 
ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 
CONRAD THIBAULT 
^LEO DE HIERAPOLIS 

ELIZABETH, Niece of the Landgrave MARIANNE GONITCH 

VENUS, Goddess of Love CYRENA VAN GORDON 

A YOUNG SHEPHERD FLORENCE IRONS 

HELEN JEPSON 
SELMA AMANSKY 
AGNES DAVIS 
RUTH GORDON 
The scene is laid in Thuringia and the Wartburg, early in the 13th Century ( 
Bacchanale in Act I, by Catherine Littlefield, Premiere Danseuse: Dorothy Littlefield, 
Douglas Coudy, William Dollar, Thomas Cannon, Dorothy Hubbard, Irene Sussell, 
Lorna Rothney and Corps de Ballet. 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. The Interior ot the Horselberg: then a Valley bctore the Wartburg. 

ACT II. The Wartburg. 

ACT III. A Valley before the Wartburg. i 



Honorary Musical Director LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor EMIL MLYNARSKI 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director .- WILHELM von WYMETAL. JR. 

Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master HENRI ELKAN 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANG:2LUCC1 

Assistant Chorus Master JEANNE RSNARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Director CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. ' 

Costumes by Consolidated Theatrical Costume Company, New York. 

Wigs by William Punjel, New York. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLanccy Sts., Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3335 Walnut Street Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Henry F. Miller — C. J. Heppe 6? Son, Agents, N. W. Cor. 6th V Thompson Sta Phi 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Association 



MRS. JOSEPH LEIDY 
Vice-President 



WILLIAM C. HAMMER 
Secretary and Treasurer 



JOHN GRIBBEL 
C. HARTMAN KUHN 
DR. JOSEPH LEIDY 
HARLEY T. McDERMOTT 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

SAMUEL H. BARKER 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

JACOB SINGER 

MRS. WILLIAM B. WHELEN. Secretary 

GROUP COMMITTEES 

MRS. MARGARET WYNNE PARIS, Chairman 

BOX COMMITTEE 

MRS. MARGARET WYNNE P.\RIS, Chairman 



MRS. T. BERTRAM LIPPINCOTT 
MRS. DANIEL L. HUTCHINSON, Jr. 
MRS. STANLEY G. FLAGG, Jr. 
JOHN C. BELL 
MRS. GEORGE DALLAS DIXON 



MRS. R. TAIT McKENZIE 

FRANCIS RAWLE, Jr. 

MRS. ISAAC W. JEANES 

MRS. EDWARD DIGBY BALTZELL 

MRS. GEORGE WILLING 



RECEPTION COMMITTEE 

MRS. EDWARD M. BIDDLE, Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY, Jr.. Treasurer MRS. W. PAUL O'NEILL, Secretary 

CHESTNUT HILL COMMITTEE MAIN LINE COMMITTEE 

MRS. RANDAL MORGAN, Chairman ^[RS. CHARLES E. GOODMAN. Chairman 

JUNIOR MAIN LINE COMMITTEE 

MISS HELENE ROERICKE, Chairman 



Dr. Tbomas G. Ashton 

Mrs. Thomas G. Ashton 

W. W. Attehbury 

Samuel H. Barker 

John C. Bell 

Mrs. Hemry A. Berwind 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Biddle 

Morris R. Bockius 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

John F. Braun 

Mrs. John Cadwalader, Jr. 

J. Hasixtine Carstairs 

Mrs. Oswald Chew 

Clareni:e M. Clark 

Herbert L. Clark 

Mrs. Alexander Brown Coxk 

Mrs. Charles E. Coxk 

Mrs. Hemry Brinton Coxi 

Mrs. Theodore W. Cramp 

Cyrus H. K. Curtis 

Mrs. Cyrus H. K. Curtis 

Mrs. George Dallas Dixon 

Dr. John T. Dorrance 

russeli. duane 

Mrs. Stanley G. Flagg, Jr. 

Miss Helen Fleisher 

Mrs. Francis I. Gowen 

Albert M. Greenfield 

John Gribbel 

Walter Hallahan 



FOUNDERS 

William C. Hammer 

Mrs. William C. Hammer 

William E. Helme 

Mrs. Charles Wolcott Henry 

Walter E. Hering 

George Howe 

Mrs. Henry S. Jeanes 

C. Clothier Jones 

C. Hartman Kuhn 

Mrs. Charles M. Lea 

Mrs. Thomas Leaming 

Dr. Joseph Leidy 

Mrs. Joseph Leidy 

Philip Ludwell Leidy 

John Frederick Lewis 

Mrs. Stacy B. Lloyd 

John Luther Long 

Mrs. George Horace Lorimer 

Charles Townsend Ludington 

J. Rutherford McAllister 

Harley T. McDermott 

Mrs. Henry Pratt McKean 

Thomas McKean 

Hon. J. Willis Martin 

Mrs. J. Willis Martin 

John C. Martin 

Jules E. Mastbaum 

Arthur E. Newbold, Jr. 

A. Edward Newton 

George W. N orris 



George R. Packard 
E. Pusey Passmore 
Mrs. Eli Kirk Price 
Wilson Pritchett 
John Hall Rankin 
Miss Anne M. Reed 
G. Brinton Roberts 
Benjamin Rush 
Arthur W. Sewall 
Jacob Singer 

Miss Caroline S. Sinkler 
Mrs. C. Shillard Smith 
Dr. Alfred Stengel 
Mrs. Leopold Stokowski 
Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 
Dr. George C. Stout 
Mrs. John B. Thayer 
Miss Anne Thomson 
Leopold A. von Seldeneck 
Clarence A. Warden 
Harvey M. Watts 
Samuel P. Wetherill, Jr. 
Andrew Wheeler 
William B. Wiielen 
Mrs. William B. Whelen 
William White 
Miss Frances A. Wistir 
Mrs. Charles R. Wood 
Mrs. Harold E. Yarnall 



Presenting the 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 



MRS. JOSEPH LEIDY 
President 
WILLIAM C. HAMMER 
General Manager 



MRS. MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

Chairman 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Director 

PHILIP LUDWELL LEIDY 

Couniel 

OFFICES 



818-819 Harrison Building, Fifteenth and Market Streets 



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